120 results for 1950

  • Calendar 1952

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1952)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1950

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1950)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1953

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1953)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1959

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1959)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1958 no. 2

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1958)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1954

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1954)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1957

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1957)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1955

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1955)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1951

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1951)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1956

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1956)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • The improvement of light land under irrigation on the Canterbury Plains

    Moore, John Leslie Neville (1957)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Calendar 1958

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1958)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • The election of 1935 in New Zealand.

    Rollo, Carol Gertrude (1950)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Of all the elections in New Zealand's political history, only two qualify for the adjective momentous. In 1890 and in 1935, Governments came to power whose vigour and liberalism were not only to alter the lives of their. contemporaries, but also to make changes that had continual repercussions in this country and echoes in other nations' handling of social problems.

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  • The ultra-violet absorption spectra of certain ketimines and their related ketones

    Kaplan, Isaac R. (1952)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    1. A review has been made of the preparation and properties of ketimines. At present no similar review exists in the chemical literature. 2. A discussion of the process of absorption, with particular reference to the carbonyl group has been offered. This discussion includes certain effects taking place, hyperconjugation being the most relevant to the thesis. 3. A series of diaryl ketones and ketimines have been prepared and studied by ultra violet spectroscopy; four of these compounds ( p-ethyl-, p-iso-propyl-, and p-tert.butyl-benzophenoneimine hydrochlorides, and p-tert.-butyl-benzophenone) have not been prepared before. The preparation and ultra violet absorption study of fenchone and fenchone-imine, have been described. 4. The Hilger Uvispek Spectrophotometer has been described and its limitations, with respect to accuracy, discussed.

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  • The heats of solution of rare gases in water

    Alexander, D. M. (1954)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The intercorrelation of data obtained from the measurement of quantities connected with the solution of gases in liquids has led to a number of empirical laws (e.g. Henry’s Law, Just’s Law) which in turn have led to attempts at theoretical justification. Attention has of course been devoted to the theoretical justification for deviation from these laws. The measurable quantities have been: (a) Solubility under various conditions (b) Molal volumes of gases in liquids These appear to have been the only quantities used. The limited scope of the data has the effect of placing great strain on the accuracy. Much of the data is discordant. Reviews of interrelationships of these quantities and the relation of the quantities to the properties of the pure components of the mixture have been published.

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  • The alkaline hydrolysis of some ethyl bromo-1-naphthoates

    Ogilvie, G. S. (1957)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    3 Bromo-1-naphthoic acid, 4-bromo-1-naphthoic acid, 5-bromo-1-naphthoic acid, and their ethyl esters have been prepared. The kinetics of alkaline hydrolysis is ethanol-water (85:15 W/W) of these esters, together with the unsubstituted ester, have been studied, using stainless steel reaction vessels, over the temperature range 25-65°C. Arrhenius frequency factors and energies of activation have been determined. The frequency factors have been shown to be constant within a small experimental error. Relative free energies, heats, and entropies of activation for these hydrolyses have been evaluated and their significance discussed. Hammett substituent constants for the bromo-substituent in the 3, 4, and 5 positions of naphthalene have been calculated and discussed.

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  • An investigation of the effects of multiple spark ignition on performance of a high speed petrol spark ignition engine

    Walters, D. L. (1954)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    At the present time ignition by high tension electric spark is almost universal on high speed reciprocating internal combustion engines other than the compression ignition type. The growing demands for greater efficiency, higher specific power output and increasing speed range with the associated high compression pressures has made greater demands on the ignition system. The modern magneto and coil, having progressed from the early hot wire and hot tube ignition, have been developed to a high stage of efficiency, although other systems have been suggested. Improvements in performance have been noted with dual ignition and this system is standard on aircraft engines, although in this case improved performance is only a secondary consideration to safety. With dual ignition, one set of plugs is connected to the first magneto and the other set to the second magneto, the sparks occurring simultaneously at the two plugs. As a result explosion is propagated from two points in the cylinder. The sparking plugs are usually placed as apart as possible and it was Swaine who suggested that better results might be obtained with sparking plugs placed very close together. As far as the author is aware, no experimental work has been carried out along these lines.

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  • New England whalers in New Zealand waters, 1800-1850

    Canham, P. G. (1959)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    New Zealanders are constantly reminded of their whaling heritage. The numerous gates and arches formed by wholes' jaw-bones, the trypot prominently displayed in Timaru's Caroline Bay, the lingering fame of Dicky Barret in New Plymouth, the legends of the Bay of Islands, and the relics held by every museum, are some of the many remnants which emphasise the role of whaling in New Zealand’s history. Present-day events play their part, too; the continued success of the Tory Channel station, and the visits by Russian and Japanese fleets from the Antarctic, maintain the tradition of New Zealand as a centre of whaling. Possibly it is because of these present day examples that the tradition has become more legendary than factual in nature, for the Tory Channel party, with their fast chasers, and the Russian fleet, with its radar, sonar and helicopters, seem almost divorced from the old methods. Consequently, there has been a tendency to glamourise the men who rowed out after whales, risking death with every stroke, and, if successful, towing the carcass tedious miles back to the trying-works. While bravery and fortitude are always commendable, only the passage of a century could make heroes out of the old-time whalers. In a similar way, legend has distorted the size and significance of the old whaling industry. To take just one example, the editor of the Marsden papers goes out of his way to add to add this comment: "An old settler informed me in the 1880’s", writes Mr. S. Percy Smith, "that he had seen over sixty whale ships at one time anchored in the Kawakawa River opposite Opua".

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  • The development of an experimental method of obtaining an influence diagram for stress in structural frames

    Robinson, J. V. (1952)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The function of an engineering structure is to receive external and gravitational forces which must be transmitted and distributed to some external medium, and the structural efficiency is a measure of the utilization of the force resisting capacity of' the structure. Structural efficiency is, however, no overall criterion of structural suitability, for aesthetic, economic and constructional qualifications must also be considered. Originally the structural efficiency was limited severely by these latter three considerations. With the development of high grade materials and manufacturing processes with closely controlled quality and precisely predictable strength, and strength deformation characteristics, it has become economically and constructionally desirable to use them efficiently. The advent or arc welding and reinforced concrete has enabled these basically more efficient structures to be economically constructed. This increased structural efficiency introduces greater degrees of indeterminancy in the structure and requires more precision in the design which in their turn have resulted in a necessary examination of load prediction, factors of safety and design method. The external forces to be transmitted by a structure will generally be continuously variable and not precisely predictable, although in some instances the load may be quite specifically defined for the whole of the life of the structure. The life of a structure is rarely known for those exposed to natural forces such as flood, earthquake or wind loads, the design loads specified in the governing code of practice are based upon the phenomenon of certain severities being definitely cyclic, the longer the cycle the greater the severity. If these loadings are then accepted a probable life period is also accepted. Similarly, the live loading values for various type structures laid down in these codes are values which have been found by experience to be satisfactory or safe for the normal life period of buildings in the area concerned, and which may or may not be proved by involuntary full scale tests.

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  • The paradoxes of strict implication

    Bennett, J.F. (1952)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The problem in logic with which the present work is concerned has its roots in the Principia Mathematica of Whitehead and Russell. The authors of that work define 'p implies q' as 'It is not the case that p is true and q is false’, whence arises the conclusion that a true proposition is implied by any proposition and a false proposition implies any proposition. These paradoxical results have met with protest, and C. L. Lewis of Harvard has attempted to supply a definition of 'p implies q' which is adequate to 'implies' as generally understood.

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