62 results for 1960, ResearchCommons@Waikato

  • The Effects of psychiatric status, sex, and concepts rated on semantic differential response style

    Priest, Peter Neville (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The psychological literature contains evidence that the Semantic Differential (SD) (Osgood, Suci and Tannenbaum, 1957) is capable of differentiating psychiatric groups from normal controls on the basis of checking style. There were three specific aims of this present study. The first was to gain further confirmation of the ability of the SD to distinguish psychiatric patients from normal subjects. The second was to see whether the sex of the subject affected his checking style and thirdly, the writer wished to see whether the actual concepts used with the SD affected response tendency. However, before these three hypotheses are discussed in detail an introduction to the SD and a review of the important literature on the instrument are in order.

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  • A Pilot investigation into the assessment of changes in the psycholinguistic abilities of new-entrant Māori school children using the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities

    St George, William Vivian Ross (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The role of language as the principal medium of instruction within the New Zealand (N .Z.) educational system has recently received increasing attention both from researchers and those responsible for the formulation of our national educational policy. In particular, much attention has been directed toward the Maori pupil and the use of the English language as the medium for his instruction. The range of literature on this question includes controlled research studies on English usage by Maori children, educational policy statements concerning the - medium of instruction to be employed in New Zealand schools and writings of a more speculative, and potentially political nature, questioning educational policy and the role of language in "Maori education".

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  • The Conservation Movement in New Zealand

    Allen, Peter D.H. (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Over the past 150 years of European settlement of New Zealand, the basis of economic growth has been the exploitation of her natural resources. The object of this study is to examine the character, motives, and exploitation of the natural resources, and the growth of attitudes to conservation. Because of the scope that such a study could cover, it is necessary to restrict it to the more outstanding characteristics of the movement for conservation in New Zealand. In the first chapter the conservation movement, particularly that of the United States, will be discussed. This will be followed in Chapter II by an examination of the resource elements of New Zealand in terms of their nature and degree of exhaustibility. In Chapter III, conservation policies and attitudes towards various resources will be identified, from the early years of European settlement to the end of World War II. The changing attitudes to the utilisation of resources, will be examined to determine their relative importance in deciding how various resources will be utilised. Contemporary attitudes to the utilisation of utilisation of resources, and to the conservation of those resources will be examined in Chapter IV. In the final chapter an attempt will be made to - 6 - identify a "conservation movement" in New Zealand in terms of the development of attitudes to resource use over the 150 years of European settlement. This study is made with the aim of highlighting developments in conservation thought at a time when the implications of' "conservation" are assuming increasing importance for New Zealand.

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  • Balance, cognitive tuning, status and positivity bias in communication of impressions

    Armstrong, Warwick David (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Experiment 1 (n=120) was a 3x2x2 analysis of variance design, investigating the interaction of the effect of cognitive tuning, balance and sex on polarization of personality impressions. While balance variables influenced polarization it did not mask the different polarization effects of the cognitive tuning sets, transmission and reception. The checking of positive traits outstriped the checking of negative traits by a factor of 2. 25. Males polarized more than females. Experiment 2 (n=40) investigated the interaction of tuning, sex and status. Status and sex effects on polarization were significantly different on transmission tuning only.

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  • Sir Henry Atkinson: A political biography, 1872-1892

    Bassett, Judith (1966)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This thesis attempts to examine in some detail the political career of Sir Harry Atkinson who held Cabinet rank for twelve of the twenty years it covers, and who dominated the Treasury for more than a decade, yet upon whom historians have so for been reluctant to expend very much thought or research. In the earliest histories of nineteenth century New Zealand Atkinson appears briefly as a sinister, equivocal figure, and in the later histories he assumes a bluff, honest aspect. Neither school presents a three-dimensional figure.

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  • Technical education in New Zealand: A Survey of developments and trends from 1940 to 1966

    Collett, Graeme Richard (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    We live in a time of change. All around us are a variety of goods; transistor radios, television sets, pre-packed frozen foods, plastic goods, synthetic materials, electrical appliances and a host of others, which were unheard of twenty-five years ago. In fact, we in New Zealand are experiencing the effect of a world wide technological revolution, which is having far reaching effects of the way of life of people throughout the world. To the fore of this revolution are the scientists and technologists who generate new ideas and learning, but equally important have become the group of skilled people who apply these ideas in practice. This group in New Zealand, receive its training mainly through our system of technical education, which has undergone vast changes as technology has advanced and needs have changed.

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  • The Significance of subsurface water as a geomorphic agent in an area of the Greywacke Ranges near Whitehall

    Oliver, Timothy Ian (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The area chosen for study is situated in the Whitehall district approximately 7 ½ miles ENE of Cambridge at GR N66/106378 (Figure 1). Recent mass movement features on part of the south and southeast-facing slopes of a valley that is tributary to the Karapiro Stream, and thence the Waikato River, were studied in some detail, but reference is also made to specific features in the area draining to the east. The southwest-facing slopes, with a relative relief of nearly 500 feet, rise to about 1,200 feet a.s.1., where a plateau-like surface dissected by broad mass movement gullies, slopes gradually to the east.

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  • Military Settlement in the Middle Waikato Basin

    Allen, Peter D. H. (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    Military settlement formed a brief but distinctive phase in the European occupation of the Middle Waikato Basin. Prior to the 1863 - 1864 Waikato War, few Europeans, other than a small number of missionaries and traders, were settled in the region. The setting of the Middle Waikato Basin was largely unmodified by Man, except along the major rivers where a dense Maori population was settled. During the 1850's, the encroachment of European settlers upon Maori tribal lands in many North Island regions, including the Waikato, led to an increase in tension between the two populations and open conflict. This conflict slowed down the progress of colonization in the North Island. To enable colonization to continue in those regions disturbed by Maori unrest, a scheme of military settlement was devised. The aim of this scheme was the formation of compact, self-sufficient defensive settlements to act as a deterrent to Maori unrest. These settlements would also provide an assurance to settlers of security for their life and property. Military settlement in the Middle Waikato Basin consisted of two phases. In the first phase, the nodal points of the military settlements, the townships, were established and occupied by the military settlers. In the second phase, farm districts were surveyed around the nodal points and the military settlers moved out from the townships to occupy and develop the land they were allocated. A number of factors, relating to deficiencies in the scheme of military settlement and to the particular problems of settlement in the region, contributed to the failure of the military settlers to successfully establish farms on the land they were allocated. The scheme of military settlement largely failed as a method of colonization in the Middle Waikato Basin. However, the pattern of human occupation, established in the initial phase of military settlement, remained when the need for defensive settlements had gone, and forms the basis of the present pattern of settlement.

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  • Coverpage and Contents

    Waikato Geological Society (1968)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Coverpage and Contents from Volume 2, Number 1, 1968 of Earth Science Journal.

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  • Chronology of fans and terraces in the Galatea Basin

    Pain, C.F.; Pullar, W.A. (1968)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Air-borne volcanic ash beds are used to date fans and terraces in the Galatea Basin and to outline the depositional history of this part of the Rangitaiki Valley. The basin is interpreted as a fault-angle depression formed by a downwarped sheet of ignimbrite and an upthrusted block of greywacke which forms the Ikawhenua Range. It is from this range that much of the detritus has been derived to fill the basin, deposited mainly in the form of fans and terraces. The larger fans cover a wide area and their surfaces are older than the Rotoma eruption of c. 8000 years B.P. The widespread occurrence of these fans indicates a major erosion interval between c. 11,000 and c. 8,000 years ago. The younger fans are distributed in a particular order with fans of the Pre-Taupo surface north of the Horomanga Stream and those of the Pre- and Post-Kaharoa surfaces south of the same stream. This ordered distribution of the younger fans suggests a climatic control of fan building. Aggradation and degradation phases in the Rangitaiki and Whirinaki Rivers have formed a pronounced meander trough containing terraces of the Pre-Taupo, Pre-Kaharoa, and Post-Kaharoa surfaces. The terrace of the Pre-Kaharoa surface, largely of Taupo Pumice alluvium, is the most common. Degradation, however, is controlled by a local base level at the ignimbrite rapids on the Rangitaiki River just north of the Galatea Basin.

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  • Aspects of the geomorphology of the Greywacke Ranges bordering the Lower and Middle Waikato Basins

    Selby, Michael J. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The fault-bounded blocks which make up the Greywacke Ranges bordering the Lower and Middle Waikato Basins have a deep red-weathered regolith and are covered by mantles of volcanic ash which can be used for dating ground surfaces. The drainage texture is exceedingly fine compared with that of Dartmoor (U.K.) and Unaka Mountains (U.S.A.) This is attributable to rainfall type, regolith, vegetation cover and soil physical properties. The major types of mass movement are deep fossil slumps on upper slopes where the regolith is deep; debris slides on mid- and lower slopes where the regolith is thin; and seepage heads controlled by ground water conditions. The valley floors show both stream incision, and aggradation resulting from infill with mass movement debris. Deforestation has increased the frequency of mass movement during high intensity rainstorms and the slopes are at present becoming adjusted to changed equilibrium conditions.

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  • Uses of volcanic ash beds in geomorphology

    Pullar, W.A. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In geomorphology air-fall volcanic ashes possess high value as marker beds. These have proved particularly useful in studies associated with infilling of flood plains, fan building, terrace correlation and chronology, erosion, shoreline and sea level changes, recent tectonics, archaeology and ground surfaces. Ash beds and the community are also discussed.

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  • Editorial

    Waikato Geological Society (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The production of yet another new journal requires some explanation although there need be no apology. The Earth Science Journal is intended to answer the need, caused by increasing specialisation by other journals, for a place in which to publish articles and research reports which are of wide interest to earth scientists, and which cross the boundaries of the traditional disciplines. To this end contributions of reports on research, essays, notes and letters will be welcomed from geologists, geomorphologists, pedologists, climatologists, oceanographers, ecologists and physical geographers.

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  • Book notices and Book reviews

    Waikato Geological Society (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Book notices and Book reviews from Volume 1, Number 2, 1967 of Earth Science Journal.

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  • Aeolian activity in a Urewera catchment

    Cochrane, G. Ross (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Analyses of sedimentary deposits on the Otapora flat and adjacent flood plain areas of Whakatane River demonstrate that aeolian activity is important even in a humid (BB'r) forested Catchment. The importance of relief and wind conditions are shown. A tentative assessment of potential feral pest damage and increased sheetwash from a forested Urewera catchment is advanced.

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  • Coverpage and Contents

    Waikato Geological Society (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Coverpage and Contents of Volume 1, Number 1, 1967 Earth Science Journal.

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  • Note on the occurrence of Taupo pumice in the Hamilton basin

    Tonkin, Philip J. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The presence of a thin layer of pumice lapilli and ash close to the surface of the Rukuhia and Moanatuatua peat bogs was recorded by Grange and Taylor (1939). Since this time a similar band of pumice has been noted in many of the other peat areas in the Hamilton basin. In the undeveloped fibrous peats of the Woodlands bog a layer of pumice lapilli 2 to 3 inches thick occurs at a depth of 18 to 20 inches from the surface. This is similar to the observations of Grange and Taylor. In the more loamy peats the pumice layer is predominantly fine ash and any lapilli present are extremely weathered and crush easily. In the fibrous peats it is thought that the fine ash that fell on the bog surface soon dispersed in the loose network of dead material, whereas the lapilli were of sufficient size to be trapped. In the loamy peats more active weathering took place in an acid environment as the organic matter was breaking down. This made the lapilli very fragile, so with drainage and compaction of the peat the lapilli were very soon crushed to fine ash size.

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  • The climate of the Waikato Basin

    de Lisle, J.F. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The topography of the Waikato Valley and its position in relation to the large-scale weather system give it warm humid summers, mild winters and a moderate rainfall with a winter maximum. Some typical meteorological situations affecting the valley are described and the individual climatic elements are considered in detail.

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  • Volcanic ash beds in the Waikato district

    Pullar, W.A. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This report lies somewhere between the "pathfinder" variety and the completed account for the reason that the results of detailed mapping and identification are still being prepared for publication. For the younger beds less than 36,000 years we now know both the source and the distribution, but for the older ashes commonly referred to as the Hamilton ash, sources are unknown and a knowledge of distribution restricted to the Waikato district. The principal source is the Okataina volcanic centre with Taupo as a subsidiary (Healy, 1964; Thompson, 1964 :44), and on this information, current mapping into the Waikato district proceeds from the east. Under the circumstances of partly completed work it seems prudent to discuss relevant ash beds already known (Vucetich and Pullar, 1963:65-6; 1964:45-6) to introduce briefly current work by the same authors and by W. T. Ward, and then to relate all of this to previous work portrayed in a soil-forming ash shower map by Taylor (1953).

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  • Annotated bibliography of central North Island volcanic ash stratigraphy

    Tonkin, Philip J.; Pullar, W.A. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Prior to 1929 many observations had been published giving brief accounts of the volcanic ash deposits in various parts of the North Island but no detailed investigations were undertaken. With the incidence of Bush Sickness in the Central North Island mapping of the "ash soils" was undertaken as part of the investigations into the cause of this disease. The work done at this time was the beginning of our present understanding of ash stratigraphy. In this bibliography only papers relevant to the Central North Island ash-showers have been mentioned.

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