174 results for 1960, Masters

  • The development of Otago's main road network

    Baker, Neill Reginald (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 112 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • W. E. Gudgeon : his contribution to the annexation of the Cook Islands.

    Currie, Ernest Rowland (1963)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaf iv-v.

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  • Mach's principle in general relativity, and other gravitational theories

    Johnson, David Louthwood (1968)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 292 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 281-289. Typescript. University of Otago department: Mathematics.

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  • Poverty in London, 1885-95.

    Cullen, Michael John (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Poverty is a relative term. Therefore the first task in this study was to establish working definitions of "poverty" and the "poor" together with an estimate of the extent of poverty in London in our period. This task had already been done for us by Charles Booth in his great survey of the Life and Labour of the People in London. The problem was thus reduced to one of testing Booth's conclusions; this question is dealt with in Chapter I. The rest of this work is concerned with describing the structure of poverty in London in our period. The end of that period is marked by the completion of the investigations carried cut for the Industry Series of the Booth Survey, the beginning by the finish of the Royal Commission on the Housing of the Working Classes of 1884-5. The Booth Survey is the major source for our study, but the decade 1885-95 also saw a number of Royal Commissions and Select Committees on topics related to the structure of poverty. Indeed, the Parliamentary Papers of the period contain a wealth of material on our subject. It was not possible to utilize this material quite as fully as had been hoped because the microcards of the Parliamentary Papers did not arrive at Canterbury as expected. Consequently, the Papers had to be used during a somewhat extended visit to Wellington. However, it must be emphasized that this is not a thesis about the Booth Survey but a thesis about poverty in London in the decade 1885-95.

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  • The politics of planning : a case study : the Christchurch Master Transportation Plan.

    Eng, Andreas (1968)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The process of amalgamation of the suburban local bodies of the Christchurch metropolitan area with the City ended with the incorporation of Sumner into the City in 1945. A brief account of the circumstances in which amalgamation took place up to 1945 offers an instructive commentary on the problem of local government reorganisation. The boroughs of Sydenham, St. Albans and Linwood amalgamated with the City in 1903 because the advantages of doing so were obvious and immediate. There were simply too many functions of common concern which could not successfully be dealt with except by an amalgamated local body. A high pressure water supply and a comprehensive method of sewage disposal were two such functions almost immediately undertaken by the new City Council. A poll of electors in each of the three relatively under-developed boroughs favoured amalgamation by a margin of better than two to one. Between 1903 and 1945 twelve more suburbs joined the City but the bulk of 'essential' reorganisation was completed with the accession of the suburbs of Bromley and Papanui in 1923.

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  • Industrial conflict in New Zealand, 1951-61

    Lukey, Lyall Gordon (1966)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis represents an Attempt to examine, in a particular historical context, the relationship between the system designed to regulate industrial conflict in New Zealand and the kind of conflict which ensues as a result of the existence of that system. The central event is the waterfront stoppage of 1951 which, over a period of five months, resulted in the loss of more than a million working days to New Zealand industry. A period of strife of the magnitude of the 1951 crisis could have served to perpetuate traditional patterns of conflict. In the event this does not seem to have happened. By over-reaching itself in 1951 the militant section of the industrial labour movement in New Zealand confirmed the attitude of the moderates: that direct action was a dangerous method for redressing grievances and securing concessions. In the decade after 1951 the incidence of stoppages and strikes was much lower than hitherto. The theme of this study is not that a period of conflict was followed by a decade of industrial harmony, but that the nature of industrial conflict itself underwent a significant change. After 1951 conflict between workers and their employers was riot suspended, but it took place largely at a political level, in a way which obscured most of the visible signs of discord. Mr. J. F. Fardell, General Manager of the Christchurch transport Board and Mr. K. McL. Baxter, National Secretary of the New Zealand Federation of Labour assisted this study by kindly providing material not readily accessible. Others, too numerous to mention, helped in various capacities and my thanks is also due to them.

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  • Studies on the biology and functional morphology of Triplectides obsoleta

    Rowley Smith, Diana Margaret (1962)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Triplectides obsolete overwinters in the larval state, and larval stages may therefore be found at all times of the year. The first part of this section entails a description of the external features of the larval form. It appeared that the larvae changed little in form throughout their larval life, for no obvious features could be found which differed greatly from one instar to the next, the main change being a gradual increase in size due to normal growth processes. The primary aim of this section was to determine the number, and if possible the duration of the larval instars; secondly that the instars may be distinguished from each other so that by sampling the population over the autumn, winter and spring months the changes in proportion of the instars represented in the population during this time could be shown. Simultaneously and indication of the larval growth and habitat distribution has been obtained. The larval case and the case building habit is dealt with in a later section. The egg mass of T. obsolete was not found in the field, but two masses were laid by one female in the laboratory. A description of these and the contained eggs is given at the end of 1/3. The 1st instar larva partly on account of the difficulty in obtaining egg stages has not been found. Consequently its description has had to be omitted from this work.

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  • The evolution of the rural settlement pattern of lowland South Taranaki, 1860-1920

    Rawson, Gerald Ian (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The settlement pattern forms the basis of any cultural landscape and it is the aim of this study in historical geography to trace its evolution in lowland South Taranaki in order to explain that landscape's final appearance. This pattern has evolved from the time of first European settlement and its study from a historical and geographical viewpoint allows the contribution of each stage in its evolution to be illustrated. To this end not only is where the people were important, but also why they were there and the intensity of their occupance. South Taranaki 's settlement pattern has formed around Agriculture, and as a result there is little need to distinguish between urban and rural uses of the land in the case of concentrations of settlement. The townships such as Ohangi, Oeo, and Matapu for example are an integral part of the rural scene as they exist only to serve their local farmers. The larger centres such as Hawera and Eltham serve a wider community than that provided by the districts' farmers but insofar as they have grown from and contributed to the rural districts they will be included as part of the rural settlement pattern. The area studied is bounded in the north by a line from Opunake through Ngaere to the edge of the hill country of inland Taranaki. This hill country and the Patea river to its mouth at Patea forms the eastern boundary (see figure 5). The coastline from Patea to Opunake forms the south western boundary. These boundaries are set not so much to argue that this area is distinct geographically as because by concentrating on a relatively small area the many factors which make up a settlement pattern can be illustrated. In addition available source material also favours this delimitation as it was the circulation area for The Hawera and Normanby Star and the Egmont Star the two major primary sources. This area includes all of the Hawera and Waimate West counties together with parts of the Patea, Eltham and Egmont counties (see figure 4). A boundary based more on county lines was considered but discarded as these had undergone many changes. The emerging of stable administrative boundaries is in itself one theme in the settlement patterns evolution. The settlement pattern in its final form was a European creation. The time period covered therefore is from 1860 when large numbers of Europeans began to settle to 1920 by which time the pattern had emerged in its final form. Most of the development took place between 1880 and 1900, while after 1920 the emphasis is on greater efficiency in farming interrupted by the depression of the 1930's.

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  • The imagery of Thomas De Quincey's 'impassioned prose'

    Dwyer, Denis Noel (1965)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • A reappraisal of the 1890 maritime strike in New Zealand

    Merrett, Ian Arthur (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Besides being a detailed study of the causes, course and consequences of the 1890 Maritime Strike in New Zealand, this thesis is also an overall account of the trials and tribulations, and the successes and failures of the labour movement in New Zealand between the passage of Stout's Trade Union Bill in 1878, and the enactment in 1894 of the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act sponsored by Reeves. As such it has attempted to place that strike in its perspective as one of the really important events in labour history. From it I hope it can be seen that the 1890 Maritime Strike has to a certain extent, influenced the structure of the labour movement from the time that Reeves's bill was passed.

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  • Morality and the women in the plays of Thomas Middleton

    Dawson, Susan Christene (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    My aim in this study is twofold. Firstly I wish to bring to light the work of a dramatist who, at least in the past, has been admired for The Changeling (although even then with reservations), but for very little else. The Changeling may be Middleton's ultimate statement about the nature of evil in the human personality, but it is by no means his only one. Part of the interest in a study of this nature must therefore be in the tracing of the development which culminates in this play, Secondly, I believe that while Middleton's women characters show a development representative of a general interest in psychology, abnormal included, which is exhibited. by many of the dramatists in the late Elizabethan and early Jacobean periods, this development is also rendered highly individual by his moral point of view.

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  • The old poetic : a reappraisal of Old English lyrical and heroic verse

    Glover, Rupert Granville (1968)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • A reappraisal of the 1890 maritime strike in New Zealand

    Merrett, Ian Arthur (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Besides being a detailed study of the causes, course and consequences of the 1890 Maritime Strike in New Zealand, this thesis is also an overall account of the trials and tribulations, and the successes and failures of the labour movement in New Zealand between the passage of Stout's Trade Union Bill in 1878, and the enactment in 1894 of the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act sponsored by Reeves. As such it has attempted to place that strike in its perspective as one of the really important events in labour history. From it I hope it can be seen that the 1890 Maritime Strike ha~to a certain extent, influenced the structure of the labour movement from the time that Reeves's bill was passed. If I have been vague in places or left out details that some might consider to be necessary or interesting, that is largely because the information was lacking. There are apparently no official union records of the period in existence today, with the exception of the correspondence book of the Cooks' and Stewards' Union in Dunedin. Unfortunately they just were not kept, or were lost at some later date. The Lyttelton Waterside Workers' Union records prior to 1951 simply disappeared after the strike that year.

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  • The musical phase of modern painting

    Mané-Wheoki, Jonathan (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Music and painting are, materially speaking, very different arts. In the former a temporally presented mode of expression addresses itself to the ear, in the latter a spatially presented mode addresses itself to the eye, and they would not appear to admit of any comparison. Modern painting interfuses the dimensions of time and space, challenging the traditional distinctions between temporal and spatial arts. A kind of multi-dimensional art results. Gauguin and van Gogh believed that painting promised to become more like music. It has. Modern painting has entered a "musical" phase-- for the painter has turned composer and performer, and his works owe an obvious debt to the sister art. Music, in turn, has drawn from the painter's domain such material as bas considerably enriched the language of sound. In no previous age were they so interdependent, and this assertion is confirmed in the astonishing parallels between them before the First World War, when the notion of a relationship between painting and music was at its zenith. "Musicality" in modern painting is associated with a tendency towards abstraction. The nearer painting approaches a pictorial art which makes no specific reference to nature, the more nearly must it align itself with an autonomous and independent system such as music. Painting and music have come to share fundamental principles of organization. What makes a painting "musical"? A musical painter? So it would seem. A number of musicians and composers have abandoned promising musical careers in order to take up painting-- among them Ciurlionis, Klee, Feininger, Russolo, and Larry Poons. Other painters have deemed it necessary to acquire musical skills. Such painters as these were "musically" committed in their works: music instructed their visual sense and informed their expression. But not all modern painting could be described as "musical". “There are musical pictures, just as there are unmusical ones, pictures that are positively hostile to the whole notion of music.” (By the same token, there is also music "positively hostile to the whole notion of music, and consequently, to the whole notion of modern painting.) Some paintings which invite musical association are ambiguous and confusing. They may remind us of music, they may not. One cannot hear a painting or see music save in the experience of abnormal sensory agitation. However much synaesthetes would persuade us to the contrary, painting is not music. The relationship between painting and music is best explained in terms of their parallel developments, and in order to do this I have looked for corresponding gestures in the two arts. Painting arrived at abstraction by analogy with music (a useful ally, since music is fundamentally non-representational.) Before the First World War (and for a short while after) painters and composers were attuned to each other in a way that had few precedents in history: a strong bond was cemented between them, and there were a great many areas in which they met. All subsequent developments in painting and music refer, in some way, to the innovations and inventions of the musical phase of modern painting.

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  • Log periodic dipole array analysis and design for free-space and above-ground applications

    Foo, Norman Yeow Khean (1966)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Preliminary to a solution of the problem of horizontally polarized log periodic aerial arrays above ground, various types of log periodic aerials are analysed. Numerical design data for the former problem are displayed in charts which should reduce trial-and-error beam scanning designs to a minimum. The single mast sloping dipole log periodic aerial is given particular attention. Computer programmes and approximate formulae are developed for both free-space and above-ground designs. The far field of these aerials is shown to be predictable from near field data. Experimental investigations, although limited in scope, confirm most of the developed theory at least qualitatively. Suggestions for further investigations are included.

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  • The Effects of psychiatric status, sex, and concepts rated on semantic differential response style

    Priest, Peter Neville (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The psychological literature contains evidence that the Semantic Differential (SD) (Osgood, Suci and Tannenbaum, 1957) is capable of differentiating psychiatric groups from normal controls on the basis of checking style. There were three specific aims of this present study. The first was to gain further confirmation of the ability of the SD to distinguish psychiatric patients from normal subjects. The second was to see whether the sex of the subject affected his checking style and thirdly, the writer wished to see whether the actual concepts used with the SD affected response tendency. However, before these three hypotheses are discussed in detail an introduction to the SD and a review of the important literature on the instrument are in order.

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  • A Pilot investigation into the assessment of changes in the psycholinguistic abilities of new-entrant Māori school children using the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities

    St George, William Vivian Ross (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The role of language as the principal medium of instruction within the New Zealand (N .Z.) educational system has recently received increasing attention both from researchers and those responsible for the formulation of our national educational policy. In particular, much attention has been directed toward the Maori pupil and the use of the English language as the medium for his instruction. The range of literature on this question includes controlled research studies on English usage by Maori children, educational policy statements concerning the - medium of instruction to be employed in New Zealand schools and writings of a more speculative, and potentially political nature, questioning educational policy and the role of language in "Maori education".

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  • Language and imagery in the plays of John Webster : a study of three plays - The white devil, The Duchess of Malfi, and The devil's law-case- and the elegy, A monumental column.

    Gunby, David Charles (1962)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The Conservation Movement in New Zealand

    Allen, Peter D.H. (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Over the past 150 years of European settlement of New Zealand, the basis of economic growth has been the exploitation of her natural resources. The object of this study is to examine the character, motives, and exploitation of the natural resources, and the growth of attitudes to conservation. Because of the scope that such a study could cover, it is necessary to restrict it to the more outstanding characteristics of the movement for conservation in New Zealand. In the first chapter the conservation movement, particularly that of the United States, will be discussed. This will be followed in Chapter II by an examination of the resource elements of New Zealand in terms of their nature and degree of exhaustibility. In Chapter III, conservation policies and attitudes towards various resources will be identified, from the early years of European settlement to the end of World War II. The changing attitudes to the utilisation of resources, will be examined to determine their relative importance in deciding how various resources will be utilised. Contemporary attitudes to the utilisation of utilisation of resources, and to the conservation of those resources will be examined in Chapter IV. In the final chapter an attempt will be made to - 6 - identify a "conservation movement" in New Zealand in terms of the development of attitudes to resource use over the 150 years of European settlement. This study is made with the aim of highlighting developments in conservation thought at a time when the implications of' "conservation" are assuming increasing importance for New Zealand.

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  • Balance, cognitive tuning, status and positivity bias in communication of impressions

    Armstrong, Warwick David (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Experiment 1 (n=120) was a 3x2x2 analysis of variance design, investigating the interaction of the effect of cognitive tuning, balance and sex on polarization of personality impressions. While balance variables influenced polarization it did not mask the different polarization effects of the cognitive tuning sets, transmission and reception. The checking of positive traits outstriped the checking of negative traits by a factor of 2. 25. Males polarized more than females. Experiment 2 (n=40) investigated the interaction of tuning, sex and status. Status and sex effects on polarization were significantly different on transmission tuning only.

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