458 results for 1960

  • The development of Otago's main road network

    Baker, Neill Reginald (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 112 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • W. E. Gudgeon : his contribution to the annexation of the Cook Islands.

    Currie, Ernest Rowland (1963)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaf iv-v.

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  • Aspects of the biology of some New Zealand echinoderms : feeding, growth and reproduction in the asteroids, Patiriella regularis (Verrill, 1867) and Coscinasterias calamaria (Gray, 1840).

    Crump, Robin (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    192 leaves :illus. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: p.138-147. The author's "The flight response in Struthiolaria papulosa giges Sowerby", reprinted from the New Zealand journal of marine and freshwater research, v.2, no.3, Sept., 1968, in pocket. University of Otago department: Zoology

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  • Mach's principle in general relativity, and other gravitational theories

    Johnson, David Louthwood (1968)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 292 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 281-289. Typescript. University of Otago department: Mathematics.

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  • The natural history of autoimmune disorders in mice and its modification by therapy

    Casey, Thomas Patrick (1964)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    3 volumes; illustrations; diagrams. Thesis (M.D.) - University of Otago.

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  • Trichosurus vulpecula and rattus norvegious in the epidemiology of two arboviruses.

    Dempster, Alexander George (1964)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 70 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Poverty in London, 1885-95.

    Cullen, Michael John (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Poverty is a relative term. Therefore the first task in this study was to establish working definitions of "poverty" and the "poor" together with an estimate of the extent of poverty in London in our period. This task had already been done for us by Charles Booth in his great survey of the Life and Labour of the People in London. The problem was thus reduced to one of testing Booth's conclusions; this question is dealt with in Chapter I. The rest of this work is concerned with describing the structure of poverty in London in our period. The end of that period is marked by the completion of the investigations carried cut for the Industry Series of the Booth Survey, the beginning by the finish of the Royal Commission on the Housing of the Working Classes of 1884-5. The Booth Survey is the major source for our study, but the decade 1885-95 also saw a number of Royal Commissions and Select Committees on topics related to the structure of poverty. Indeed, the Parliamentary Papers of the period contain a wealth of material on our subject. It was not possible to utilize this material quite as fully as had been hoped because the microcards of the Parliamentary Papers did not arrive at Canterbury as expected. Consequently, the Papers had to be used during a somewhat extended visit to Wellington. However, it must be emphasized that this is not a thesis about the Booth Survey but a thesis about poverty in London in the decade 1885-95.

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  • The politics of planning : a case study : the Christchurch Master Transportation Plan.

    Eng, Andreas (1968)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The process of amalgamation of the suburban local bodies of the Christchurch metropolitan area with the City ended with the incorporation of Sumner into the City in 1945. A brief account of the circumstances in which amalgamation took place up to 1945 offers an instructive commentary on the problem of local government reorganisation. The boroughs of Sydenham, St. Albans and Linwood amalgamated with the City in 1903 because the advantages of doing so were obvious and immediate. There were simply too many functions of common concern which could not successfully be dealt with except by an amalgamated local body. A high pressure water supply and a comprehensive method of sewage disposal were two such functions almost immediately undertaken by the new City Council. A poll of electors in each of the three relatively under-developed boroughs favoured amalgamation by a margin of better than two to one. Between 1903 and 1945 twelve more suburbs joined the City but the bulk of 'essential' reorganisation was completed with the accession of the suburbs of Bromley and Papanui in 1923.

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  • The Wellington urban motorway : the parts played by the planning authorities and the Bolton Street Preservation Society

    Miller, Richard Ogilvy (1969)

    Bachelor of Arts thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The inadequacy of our present planning system to accomodate at the critical stage participation of interested citizens in the control of their environment. A case history showing how the negotiations between the various authorities and the Bolton Street Cemetery Preservation Society, the route of the motorway, concerning demonstrates the truth or otherwise of the hypothesis.

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  • Calendar 1961

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1961)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1960

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1960)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Industrial conflict in New Zealand, 1951-61

    Lukey, Lyall Gordon (1966)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis represents an Attempt to examine, in a particular historical context, the relationship between the system designed to regulate industrial conflict in New Zealand and the kind of conflict which ensues as a result of the existence of that system. The central event is the waterfront stoppage of 1951 which, over a period of five months, resulted in the loss of more than a million working days to New Zealand industry. A period of strife of the magnitude of the 1951 crisis could have served to perpetuate traditional patterns of conflict. In the event this does not seem to have happened. By over-reaching itself in 1951 the militant section of the industrial labour movement in New Zealand confirmed the attitude of the moderates: that direct action was a dangerous method for redressing grievances and securing concessions. In the decade after 1951 the incidence of stoppages and strikes was much lower than hitherto. The theme of this study is not that a period of conflict was followed by a decade of industrial harmony, but that the nature of industrial conflict itself underwent a significant change. After 1951 conflict between workers and their employers was riot suspended, but it took place largely at a political level, in a way which obscured most of the visible signs of discord. Mr. J. F. Fardell, General Manager of the Christchurch transport Board and Mr. K. McL. Baxter, National Secretary of the New Zealand Federation of Labour assisted this study by kindly providing material not readily accessible. Others, too numerous to mention, helped in various capacities and my thanks is also due to them.

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  • Studies on the biology and functional morphology of Triplectides obsoleta

    Rowley Smith, Diana Margaret (1962)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Triplectides obsolete overwinters in the larval state, and larval stages may therefore be found at all times of the year. The first part of this section entails a description of the external features of the larval form. It appeared that the larvae changed little in form throughout their larval life, for no obvious features could be found which differed greatly from one instar to the next, the main change being a gradual increase in size due to normal growth processes. The primary aim of this section was to determine the number, and if possible the duration of the larval instars; secondly that the instars may be distinguished from each other so that by sampling the population over the autumn, winter and spring months the changes in proportion of the instars represented in the population during this time could be shown. Simultaneously and indication of the larval growth and habitat distribution has been obtained. The larval case and the case building habit is dealt with in a later section. The egg mass of T. obsolete was not found in the field, but two masses were laid by one female in the laboratory. A description of these and the contained eggs is given at the end of 1/3. The 1st instar larva partly on account of the difficulty in obtaining egg stages has not been found. Consequently its description has had to be omitted from this work.

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  • Some aspects of molybdenum halide chemistry

    Gainsford, G.J. (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Chemical and X-ray crystallographic studies of molybdenum(II) halides, which are based on the well-known (Mo₆Cl₈)⁴⁺ cluster, have been carried out. Contrary to previous reports, the reactions of 2,2'-bipyridyl with the halides (Mo₆Cl₈)Cl₄ and (Mo₆Cl₈)I₄ yield, even under mild conditions, bipyridylium salts of chloromolybdic(II) and iodomolybdic(II) acids respectively: (BipyH)₂((Mo₆Cl₈)X₆) where X = Cl, I and Bipy = 2,2'-bipyridyl. The reactions are complicated by the formation of mixtures of products, which are mainly various crystalline forms of the bipyridylium salts. An amorphous product may be a true mono-bipyridyl complex. An unusual oxidation occurs during the reactions of triphenylphosphine (Ph₃P) and triphenylarsine (Ph₃As) with (Mo₆Cl₈)Cl₄ and (Mo₆Cl₈)I₄. Infra-red spectral and X-ray powder photographic studies show that the oxidized ligand complexes, (Mo₆Cl₈)X₄(Ph₃Z0)₂ (X = Cl, I; Z = As,P), are formed except under conditions in which both molecular and chemically-bound oxygen is rigorously excluded. The conditions required to coordinate more than two neutral unidentate ligands to the (Mo₆Cl₈)⁴⁺ cluster have been examined. It proved possible to obtain new ionic complexes under a range of conditions. The six-fold coordination of the (Mo₆Cl₈)⁴⁺ cluster is maintained in these compounds (e.g. ((Mo₆Cl₈)I₃(triphenylphosphine oxide)₂(pyridine))⁺I⁻) by the ionization of one or more of the terminal halogen atoms in the molybdenum(II) halide starting material (e.g.(Mo₆Cl₈)I₄). The X-ray single crystal structures of two isomorphous salts, (BipyH)₂(( (Mo₆Cl₈)X₆) (X = Cl,I), have been solved using the difference Patterson method. To solve another crystalline modification of the chloro-salt, the (Mo₆Cl₈) cluster was constrained to its established geometry with its centroid fixed at the origin of the unit cell. This rigid group of atoms was then rotated by the least-squares refinement of the three orientation-defining angles. The three structures contain discrete ((Mo₆Cl₈)X₆)²⁻(X = Cl,I) and (C₁₀H₉N₂)⁺ (bipyridylium) ions. The anions consist of highly-symmetric (Mo₆Cl₈) clusters (Mo-Mo = 2.606, Mo-Cl = 2.48 Ao), with six terminal halogen atoms (X) bound by single covalent bonds to the molybdenum atoms (Mo-Cl = 2.423, Mo-I = 2.737 Ao). The bipyridylium cations are twisted from perfect cis conformations in all three structures. The average dihedral angle between the two rings is 13 degrees. Further details of the geometries of the anion and cation are discussed. The ionic packing in the three crystals is dominated by the bulky anions. These are arranged in expanded "hexagonal close-packed" layers with the cations centred on approximately trigonal holes in this array. The two crystalline modifications of the chloro-salt differ in the orientation of the bipyridylium cations in these layers.

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  • Uranium luminescence

    Nicholas, J.V. (1966)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Lower ionospheric irregularities

    Vincent, R.A. (1967)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis is a study of the structure of that part of the ionosphere lying between 60 and 120 km. In the usual terminology the ionized parts of the atmosphere in this altitude range are called the ionospheric D and E regions, the boundary between them occurring at a height of 90 km. Above this height the E region extends upwards to 140 km, the base of the F region. Since the ionization below 50 km is not enough to effect the propagation or radio waves this height effectively marks the bottom of the D region. There is also another system of nomenclature based on the neutral gas temperatures of the atmosphere. The mesosphere lies in the altitude range 50 to 85 km, which is a region of decreasing temperature with height. Because they refer to the same height range the terms mesosphere and D region are often used synonymously in the following work. Above 90 km the temperature increases, rapidly at first and then more slowly, in the thermosphere.

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  • The evolution of the rural settlement pattern of lowland South Taranaki, 1860-1920

    Rawson, Gerald Ian (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The settlement pattern forms the basis of any cultural landscape and it is the aim of this study in historical geography to trace its evolution in lowland South Taranaki in order to explain that landscape's final appearance. This pattern has evolved from the time of first European settlement and its study from a historical and geographical viewpoint allows the contribution of each stage in its evolution to be illustrated. To this end not only is where the people were important, but also why they were there and the intensity of their occupance. South Taranaki 's settlement pattern has formed around Agriculture, and as a result there is little need to distinguish between urban and rural uses of the land in the case of concentrations of settlement. The townships such as Ohangi, Oeo, and Matapu for example are an integral part of the rural scene as they exist only to serve their local farmers. The larger centres such as Hawera and Eltham serve a wider community than that provided by the districts' farmers but insofar as they have grown from and contributed to the rural districts they will be included as part of the rural settlement pattern. The area studied is bounded in the north by a line from Opunake through Ngaere to the edge of the hill country of inland Taranaki. This hill country and the Patea river to its mouth at Patea forms the eastern boundary (see figure 5). The coastline from Patea to Opunake forms the south western boundary. These boundaries are set not so much to argue that this area is distinct geographically as because by concentrating on a relatively small area the many factors which make up a settlement pattern can be illustrated. In addition available source material also favours this delimitation as it was the circulation area for The Hawera and Normanby Star and the Egmont Star the two major primary sources. This area includes all of the Hawera and Waimate West counties together with parts of the Patea, Eltham and Egmont counties (see figure 4). A boundary based more on county lines was considered but discarded as these had undergone many changes. The emerging of stable administrative boundaries is in itself one theme in the settlement patterns evolution. The settlement pattern in its final form was a European creation. The time period covered therefore is from 1860 when large numbers of Europeans began to settle to 1920 by which time the pattern had emerged in its final form. Most of the development took place between 1880 and 1900, while after 1920 the emphasis is on greater efficiency in farming interrupted by the depression of the 1930's.

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  • The imagery of Thomas De Quincey's 'impassioned prose'

    Dwyer, Denis Noel (1965)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • A reappraisal of the 1890 maritime strike in New Zealand

    Merrett, Ian Arthur (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Besides being a detailed study of the causes, course and consequences of the 1890 Maritime Strike in New Zealand, this thesis is also an overall account of the trials and tribulations, and the successes and failures of the labour movement in New Zealand between the passage of Stout's Trade Union Bill in 1878, and the enactment in 1894 of the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act sponsored by Reeves. As such it has attempted to place that strike in its perspective as one of the really important events in labour history. From it I hope it can be seen that the 1890 Maritime Strike has to a certain extent, influenced the structure of the labour movement from the time that Reeves's bill was passed.

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  • Morality and the women in the plays of Thomas Middleton

    Dawson, Susan Christene (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    My aim in this study is twofold. Firstly I wish to bring to light the work of a dramatist who, at least in the past, has been admired for The Changeling (although even then with reservations), but for very little else. The Changeling may be Middleton's ultimate statement about the nature of evil in the human personality, but it is by no means his only one. Part of the interest in a study of this nature must therefore be in the tracing of the development which culminates in this play, Secondly, I believe that while Middleton's women characters show a development representative of a general interest in psychology, abnormal included, which is exhibited. by many of the dramatists in the late Elizabethan and early Jacobean periods, this development is also rendered highly individual by his moral point of view.

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