259 results for 1970, Masters

  • Accounting for thinking with reference to the deaf

    Long, D. S. (1975)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Faced with an apparent conflict between two approaches to the teaching of deaf children : (i) that we should teach deaf children a language so that they can think, and (ii) that we should teach deaf children to think so that they can then acquire a language - I have examined the assumptions about thinking assumed by these two schools of thought. Reductionists hold that thinking is nothing but such things as inner speech (they identify thinking with its expression). Duplicationists argue that this is an inadequate explication of the concept of thinking (that it is only half the story) and they argue that thinking is something else as well as its expression. If successful Duplicationism becomes an objection to Reductionism. Unfortunately it results in an infinite regress. A third alternative account of thinking (Ryle's Adverbial account) regards thinking as an adverbial characterization: thinking is the way or circumstances in which we perform certain diverse and neutral (vis-a-vis thinking) activities. By such an account the elements of thinking which Duplicationists accuse Reductionist of ignoring become conditional dispositions. I argue that they should be regarded as categorical dispositional ascriptions. Additionally Ryle assumes a "process" account of thinking when in point of fact an "episodic" account is required. The thesis concludes by arguing that we need an ontology sufficiently large to take in all the aspects of thinking and that in turn this will generate not one precept but a matrix of precepts for the education of the deaf.

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  • Workers' perceptions of industry, and their commitment to their union

    Coup, Owen (1974)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In the field of industrial sociology, little research has been done which views industry and the organisations associated with it, from the worker's perspective. There is agreement among those associated with the field in this country, that very little is known about the attitudes, perceptions and expectations that the New Zealand industrial worker has of industry, employer and job. It is important that research be done on the worker's views, since this would establish a better basis for our industrial relations policy. The present research was designed as an exploratory study, to examine workers' perceptions of their industry, their relationship with their employer, and their union. Essentially, there were two specific points considered. The first was an examination of the adequacy of Marxian theory as an explanation for the relationship that exists between employer and worker in the New Zealand industrial setting. The second was a preliminary analysis of the validity of a model, which attempts to predict the commitment of workers to their union, on the basis of certain preconditions which are outlined as a series of five stages. The research consisted of interviews with workers sampled from two unions in the Christchurch area. The analysis of the data did not use any sophisticated statistical techniques, since these were not appropriate for a preliminary study, or the size of the sample involved. The conclusions reached on the first point were, that although these workers do display certain characteristics that would be expected on the basis of a Marxian perspective, they also have other characteristics (notably an awareness of the interdependence of worker and employer), which Marxian theory cannot explain adequately. With regard to the model, the trends that it predicts definitely occur in this data, but the model does not account for all factors affecting the commitment of union members. It needs refinement and further, more rigorous, testing, before any final conclusion can be reached regarding its validity. As is appropriate for an exploratory study, a considerable number of suggestions for further research have been generated.

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  • The poetic novels of Thomas Hardy and George Meredith

    Pyke, Allen Francis (1973)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Criticism of the novels of Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) and George Meredith (1828-1909) has often concerned itself with the philosophy of, and biographical elements behind, the works. Because of this, Hardy's novels have often been considered largely as examples or inconsistently rendered theses on fatalism set in a rural framework, whilst those of Meredith as pretentious, obscure drawing-room comedies of love. Yet few critics refrain from acknowledging a qualified, largely undefined, greatness in these novels. Very little close textual analysis of these novels has yet been undertaken, and in this thesis four novels by each of these writers is to be subjected to a close textual analysis. The aim of this examination is to demonstrate that the use of language in these works is closer to that of poetry than that of conventional novels. Not only is meaning conveyed by a poetic use of language but the novels are structured poetically and a poetic vision informs them, so that the ultimate aim of this thesis is to prove that the novels of Thomas Hardy and George Meredith are essentially poetic. Whilst the "poetic" twentieth century novel seems to earn immediate critical acceptance, a general reluctance to acknowledge earlier examples of this form of novel seems to be common. Concentrating on one particular novel by each of these authors I hope to illustrate first its poetic qualities, then show how these are apparent in their other works, and finally I shall very briefly indicate the importance of their contribution to the development of “the poetic novel.”

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  • The veil removed : reality, ideality and dream in the later works of Robin Hyde

    Sharplin, Janscie Elizabeth (1971)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Short term economic load allocation : a report

    Turner, Michael Duncan (1971)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The method of equal incremental cost of received power is well established as a means or determining the most economic distribution of active power, while satisfying the power system load demand, subject to generation and water constraints. This report considers the concepts and implications of the method, in applying it to part, or all, of the New Zealand Power System. A digital computer program, developed as part of this report, is described which implements the method on a model of the South Island subsystem of the New Zealand Power System and provided the necessary computational experience to evaluate some of the important aspects of economic scheduling with this method.

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  • The labour movement in Canterbury, 1880-1893.

    Coates, Halina Maria Ogonowska (1979)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The. development of industry and the associated .. problems of sweated labour within the newly developed industries are examined. The emerging awareness of the working class of the necessity for trade union organisation in order to safeguard their right~ to a reasonable standard of living and the organisation of these trade unions is discussed. The rise of confidence among trade unionists and their involvement in the Maritime Strike of 1890 emerges as a critical influence. The defeat of the unions in the strike and the subsequent move towards political representation by working men emerges during the late 1880 1s. The alliance between Liberal and Labour influences in parliament is discussed.

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  • New Zealand and the oil crisis : an examination of foreign policy reactions.

    McKay, Matthew Harold (1975)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    There already exists a body of literature that relates to the reactions of small states as compared with the reactions of larger states. The small-state theories maintain that, when subjected to pressure, small states change their policies more quickly than larger states. One of the basic aims of this study is to test the validity of the existing small-state theories against the actual reactions during a specific situation. The major part of the study involves a detailed examination of New Zealand's foreign policy reactions towards the Middle East since the outbreak of the 4th Arab-Israeli War. Research indicates that New Zealand altered its Middle Eastern policy as a result of the oil crisis. New Zealand has shifted from its traditional pro-Israeli position to a more neutral attitude towards the Middle East conflict. It appears, then, that New Zealand reacted in very much the manner one would expect from the small-state theories. To be valid, however, the small-state theories should also be able to account for the reactions of other countries to the same set of variables. A comparison of the 'before and after' positions of twenty-five other countries indicated that, contrary to the small~state theories, there was no stron~ correlation between the size of a country and its vulnerability td the Arab oil-pressure. However, there may well have been a significant, positive correlation between~ high oil share.of primary energy requirements and vulnerability to oil-pressure. My research also suggests that there was an even more significant, positive correlation between a high level of imported Arab oil and vulnerability to Arab oil-pressure. As a result of these findings, I have formulated . an alternative model to account for.reactions to the Arab oil-crisis. I believe one must consider the oil crisis in terms of a bargaining game. The alternative model is based on two· closely related hypotheses. The first suggests that with an increasing dependence upon Arab oil . ' there is a greater possibility of a larger shift in policy when subjected to pressure from the ·Arab oil-producers. This is a result of the ~trong bargaining position from which the Arab bloc can negotiate. The allied hypothesis maintains that the lower the dependence on Arab oil, the less likelihood there is of a large shift in policy. ·The country under pressure in this situation has a greater freedom of choice as a result of the weaker Arab bargaining position.

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  • Verbal and visual structures in the novels of Thackeray.

    Rawlence, Grant William (1973)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Poems for Spain : the response of British poets to the Spanish Civil War

    Dillon, Christopher John (1975)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis examines three main facets of the 1930s poetic movement in Britain. Firstly the nature of the "thirties tradition" in English literature is establlshed, then aesthetic formulations of that period are considered. Both of these areas of enquiry relate principally to the poetic response to the Spanish civil War. Thirdly the poetry written in response to the Spanish Civil War is surveyed. It is intended that this study should suggest the chief ambitions of the thirties writers examined, namely the formulation of a socially responsible form of literature suiting the demands of their time, and evaluate their efforts to fulfil that ambition.

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  • Biology of age 0+ sand flounder Rhombosolea plebeia in the Avon-Heathcote estuary

    Kilner, Allan R. (1974)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The sand flounder Rhombosolea plebeia (Richardson) (Pleuronectidae) inhabits shallow coastal marine and brackish water regions throughout New Zealand, Auckland Islands and possibly Australia. Relatively little research has been carried out on this important commercial species. The principal investigation up to the present time is an unpublished Ph.D. thesis by Mundy (1968), who carried out a population study involving tagging of adult fish off the Canterbury coast. Some data were provided as part of a study on the fish population of the Avon-Heathcote Estuary by Webb (1966, 1972, 1973a, 1973b). A Ph.D. study on osmoregulation of sand flounder from Otago Harbour has been completed by Raj (1973), and a study of flounder spawning in the Hauraki Gulf has also been recently published by Colman (1973). The shallow water inlets and estuaries around the Canterbury coast act as a nursery for young stages of sand flounder. While some population and feeding studies have been carried out on the older age classes, little is known of its early development, natural history and physiology. The Avon-Heathcote Estuary (latitude 43°32'S., longitude 172°43'E.), the study area in the present investigation (Fig. 1), is one of these nursery areas for the young stages. It is probably the principal area for producing fish to restock the offshore grounds which provide the commercial catches on the east coast of the South Island (Mundy, 1968). Sand flounder is an important commercial species, both in terms of public demand and in the volume of landings. The annual landings of' flounder of all species in New Zealand from 1944-1970 was about 907,730 kg, and of this total sand flounder formed about 50 percent (New Zealand Marine Department, Reports on Fisheries, 1944-1970). Hence the study of its biology in a major nursery area and of the effects of man-made environmental changes and pollution is important. The Christchurch Drainage Board proposes to control flooding in the City of Christchurch and have had several flood control schemes tested by the Hydraulics Research Station, Wallingford, England. They have also commissioned an intensive biological research programme on the Avon-Heathcote Estuary headed by Professor G.A. Knox, Department of Zoology, University of Canterbury to assess the effects of' these flood control schemes. The present study forms part of this biological research programme. The flood control schemes include proposals to erect a barrier near the Estuary mouth. If spring tides coincide with heavy rainfall, surface flooding in parts of Christchurch becomes a problem. When flooding is imminent it is proposed that the barrier gates will be closed at low water to prevent tidal penetration so that flood water can drain into the Estuary without being retarded by the incoming tide. Any such scheme affecting the biology of the Estuary must be carefully considered as undesirable effects may result. The first general study of the biology of the Estuary was made by Thompson (1930), whose work forms a useful basis with which to compare changes that have occurred since then. More specific studies have been made on polychaetes (Estcourt, 1962), fish populations (Webb, 1966), sand flounder (Mundy, 1968) and benthic macrofauna (Voller, 1973), and a number of surveys directed at the effect of pollution in the Estuary have been carried out by Bruce (1953), Williams (1959), Rosenburg (1963), Webb (1965) and Cameron (1969). Pollution studies of the Avon and Heathcote Rivers have been published by Hogan and Wilkinson (1959) and Cameron (1970). Other studies including Estuary populations as part of more extensive research have also been carried out (for a complete bibliography see Knox and Kilner, 1973). Research currently in progress, in addition to the O+ sand flounder study, include studies on the algal communities, a water chemical analysis programme and an investigation of the biology of the Christchurch Drainage Board’s Sewage Oxidation Ponds. A report on the general ecology of the Estuary has been prepared recently (Knox and Kilner, 1973), and this summarizes much of the above material and includes other relevant information.

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  • Reactions of 1,2-epoxyoctane

    Lim, C. E. (1975)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The synthesis of 1,2-epoxyoctane (6) and the stereo-specifically labelled mono and dideuterated derivatives (7) and (8) are described. The BF3 : etherate catalysed rearrangement of 1,2-epoxyoctanes(6), (7) and (8) in ether gave products identified as 1-ethoxy-octan-2-ol (9a), (1S, 2S)1R, 2R-1-d-1-ethoxy-octan-2-ol (10a) and (1R, 2S)1S, 2R-1,2-dideutero-1-ethoxy-octan-2-ol (11a) respectively. The BF3 : etherate catalysed rearrangement of 1,2-epoxyoctane (6) gave aldehyde (14) by selective migration (ca. 1.41 : 1) of the hydrogen atom (Hb) trans to the long chain aliphatic group.

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  • Religion and humanism in Sir Thomas More's Utopia

    Fox, Alistair (1970)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • T.S. Eliot's "Four quartets" : the function of the titles in the pattern of the poem

    Mackay, Ross Alistair (1975)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Odds : reflections and directions; a thematic study of four plays by Samuel Beckett

    O'Connor, Elizabeth Joan (1979)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The thesis makes a thematic study of by Samuel Beckett consisting of Theatre I (1956), Theatre II (1958), Radio I (1961) and Radio II (1962). All were unpublished until 1973 or later. Concentrating on the plays written between 1948 and 1963, Chapter One briefly presents the major themes of Beckett's drama. Chapter Two places Theatre I and II within the thematic progression revealed by the first chapter. After more detailed treatment of Beckett's use of the radio medium, Chapter Three examines Radio I and II. It locates their chronological and thematic position among the radio plays, and uses them to reinforce claims made concerning the particular thematic developments that have taken place during the growth of Beckett's radio drama. The thesis concludes with a short discussion of the highly derivative nature of some among the four plays, and suggests reasons for their not having been published until recently. The thesis shows how the transition from the prose writings of the 1940’s to the stage plays of the 1950's led to works whose major concern was the general human condition, presented in a more obviously external frame of reference, within the plays. The stage plays Theatre I and II are examined in close conjunction with two of the major works of the decade - Endgame and Krapp’s Last Tape. Discussion of all the radio plays, including Radio I and II and Chapter Three shows how through the radio medium Beckett returned to the internalized universe and artistic concerns of the prose written prior to 1950, but in an effectively dramatized form. Overall, the examination of these little-known plays, in the context of general thematic development in Beckett's drama, provides particular insight into the different thematic possibilities of differing genres and media in Beckett's work.

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  • Student religion

    Barber, L. I. (1973)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this study, certain aspects of the religious attitudes of students were examined in order to ascertain the nature and importance of student religiosity at this University. Changes in religious beliefs and practices were also looked at, as were relationships between the various dimensions of religion and selected background variables. A survey of this nature, as far as is known, has not previously been carried out in a New Zealand University, and only a few such studies have been conducted in Australia and Britain. Most such surveys are North American in origin. The comparability of data gathered in different cultural contexts is limited, because different atmospheres prevail at the Universities and because different concepts are used to measure religiosity. These concepts may also have different meanings in different countries. For this reason only an analysis of religion at a New Zealand University can fully portray, in an authentic manner, the extent and nature of religious feeling amongst New Zealand students. Only a properly conducted research study can establish the validity of speculative claims, such as that atheism, and at the least, lack of any religious belief, is widespread within the Universities. Religion is an important area of analysis in that it may be a means of transmitting values which give meaning to a persons life, and which can affect areas of belief and behaviour other than the purely religious. The most profound questions of a persons life may be conceived in terms of religious symbols, and the values which are formed have been found to persist long after students leave University. Nelson, (1956) for example, found that attitudes held in college persisted for at least fourteen years. The area which religion covers is diverse, and it is often difficult to draw the line between religion and other belief systems which are only marginally religious. Because of this diversity many “hidden religions” (Yinger 1970) are overlooked, and too often only the more traditional religions are examined. Yinger goes as far as thinking of nearly everyone as being religious in that nearly everyone has some ultimate concern in life. The following section, (Part I), looks in more detail at the various definitions and dimensions of religion.

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  • The evolution of the coal mining community of Denniston

    Smallholme-Fraser, Elizabeth A. (1978)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study concerns the birth of the coal industry and a new community in the Buller where the entrepeneurs and emigrants were faced with an untouched and rigorous environment. The location for Denniston was remote and hazardous. The coalfield was perched on a wind-swept plateau, 1,800 feet above sea-level, and connected with the outside world by an inclined railway. The development of unionism within that community is also examined for Denniston spawned a labour leader who organized the 'Coast and became an inaugaral member of the Maritime Council. The advent of the Seamens' Union has been researched, and there was clearly a need for a study of the origins of unionism among the coalminers in the Buller. Similarly, while much is known of J. A. Millar, John Lomas' important role in New Zealand labour history has yet received scant attention. The Denniston coalfield seemed to afford an excellent opportunity to examine the relative influence of British example and New Zealand experience in the development of New Zealand unionism. Related to the growth of unionism on Denniston is the nature of the overall effect of the coal industry on the Buller region. Coal was to provide a new staple for a local economy which was still living in the afterglow of the gold rushes. It could be expected however, that the established community of Westport would be ambivalent in its reaction to the arrival of the coalminers. Merchants and businessmen welcomed the additional revenue the coal industry promised but were fearful of the class tensions which would accompany the changes.

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  • Geriatrics. A study in role conflict

    Coulter, Iaon Douglass (1970)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    'It is true that a scientific study may prove its usefulness if it is productive of practical results, provided however, that in the pursuit of the study no other goals are kept in mind than those of science'. (P. V. Young). Throughout its development sociology has been involved in the debate of the relationship between social theory and social practice, between values and social science. Social practice has necessarily meant a commitment to some values or ethical position. Positions taken in this debate have ranged variously from Weber's myth of a value-free sociology to Berger's and Remmling’s conception of sociology as a modern form of consciousness. Though the idea of a value-free sociology is not seriously entertained by most sociologists now (certainly not by the so called New Sociologists as illustrated in Horowitz's attack on project Camelot) the heritage of the debate has been a delineation between social theory and social practice. The social theorists see the proper pursuit of sociologists as the continued expansion and development of sociology as a scientific discipline. While this may result in results which can be used by social practitioners, such results are a latent function of the scientific contribution. This is expressed in the quotation above from Young. For those sociologists concerned with social practice it has meant a concentration on social problems as an end in itself. Where these sociologists have tried to incorporate theory it has usually been in the form of ad hoc explanations for the problem being studied. Alienation and anomie are two concepts which have been used extensively by such workers. Few social practitioners have used the problem situations for testing the major assumptions of the theories existing in sociology, or for formulating more general theories for social structure and social processes. Even such noted writers as Mills see applied social science as antithetical to true scientific endeavours, when it results in the abdication of the choice of specific problems to others.

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  • FIDO : a system that can be taught to respond with suitable output messages

    Collister, C. V. (1979)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    An investigation has been made into improving messages output by a computer system by using a program called FIDO (From Input Derive Output), which can be taught to give appropriate output messages in varying situations. A number of possible applications for such a program are discussed and the idea is particularly applied to syntax error messages for LR(1) parsers. Many of the ideas used in pattern recognition are applicable to FIDO. Important features of the system developed are - It can be used in a number of applications. - It is simple. - It makes reasonable demands on computer resources. - It is easy to use. Examples of FIDO in use are given.

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  • YACAS : a batch computer animation system

    Britton, Thomas J. (1978)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis describes the design and implementation of a computer animation system called YACAS. YACAS is a batch animation system consisting of two parts. One part is a set of subroutines written in Burroughs Extended ALGOL that provide a number of functions for use by an animator in preparing a program to make an animated film. The second part is a program which the animator can use to interactively display and record his film. Pictures produced by the system are 2 dimensional "wire-frame" images in black and white. In YACAS the data structure recognizes a distinction between the shape of a picture (referred to as a “cel”) and other picture attributes (position, size, etc). Pictures may be "simple" or may be joined and manipulated as a hierarchical group called an "articulated" picture. A small number of commands have been provided to allow motions of pictures and the display window to be described. A mechanism is provided to allow the user number of motions to add new motion commands. An arbitrary number of motions may be flexibly combined to produce concurrent asynchronous motions. A compact form of film file is produced by the user's animation program which can be displayed with the interactive playback program. The main body of the thesis describes YACAS as it has been designed and implemented. The last chapter of the thesis describes a number of enhancements that would make YACAS more versatile. Appendix A is a complete User Guide for the system, while Appendix B gives an example of the programming and use of the YACAS subroutines.

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  • Spectroscopic studies of sulphide, selenide and telluride complexes of palladium (II), rhodium (III) and mercury (II)

    Loh, K. S. (1972)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The work described in this thesis is concerned with the preparation of dialkyl sulphide (selenide and telluride) and the alkyl phenyl sulphide (selenide) complexes of palladium(II), rhodium(III) and mercury(II) and a study of their spectroscopic properties. Trans-square-planar complexes PdX₂L₂ (where X=halogen, nitrite and nitrate; L=R₂S, Et₂Se, Et₂Te, Ph.S.R, Ph.S.Et) have been prepared and studied using n.m.r., low frequency infra-red and electronic spectroscopic techniques. The influence of the ligand X, cis to the sulphide (selenide and telluride) ligands, on the protons of the α and β carbon atoms of L has been investigated by means of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results can be interpreted in terms of a significant dπ -dπ bonding between the ligand X and palladium. Metal-halogen, metal-nitrogen, metal-sulphide (selenide and telluride) stretching frequencies have been assigned in the low frequency infra-red region. Both ligand field and ligand to metal charge transfer transitions have been observed in the visible and ultra-violet region of the spectra and assignments have been made. Octahedral complexes mer-RhX₃L₃ (where X=halogen, L=Ph.S.R) and dimeric complexes (Hgx₂.L)₂ containing mercury in a tetrahedral environment (X=halogen, L=R₂S, Et₂Se and Et₂Te) have also been prepared and investigated in a similar manner. Some exploratory work on reactions of dialkyl sulphide complexes of palladium(II) and preparation of new complexes of rhodium(I) was carried out.

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