257 results for 1970, Masters

  • Accounting for thinking with reference to the deaf

    Long, D. S. (1975)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Faced with an apparent conflict between two approaches to the teaching of deaf children : (i) that we should teach deaf children a language so that they can think, and (ii) that we should teach deaf children to think so that they can then acquire a language - I have examined the assumptions about thinking assumed by these two schools of thought. Reductionists hold that thinking is nothing but such things as inner speech (they identify thinking with its expression). Duplicationists argue that this is an inadequate explication of the concept of thinking (that it is only half the story) and they argue that thinking is something else as well as its expression. If successful Duplicationism becomes an objection to Reductionism. Unfortunately it results in an infinite regress. A third alternative account of thinking (Ryle's Adverbial account) regards thinking as an adverbial characterization: thinking is the way or circumstances in which we perform certain diverse and neutral (vis-a-vis thinking) activities. By such an account the elements of thinking which Duplicationists accuse Reductionist of ignoring become conditional dispositions. I argue that they should be regarded as categorical dispositional ascriptions. Additionally Ryle assumes a "process" account of thinking when in point of fact an "episodic" account is required. The thesis concludes by arguing that we need an ontology sufficiently large to take in all the aspects of thinking and that in turn this will generate not one precept but a matrix of precepts for the education of the deaf.

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  • Aspects of uncertainty in private and public law

    Grant, Malcolm J. (1972)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xvi, 260, 6, 18, 10, 4, 21 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Aetiology of denture sore mouth : yeasts and oral hygiene.

    Burton, John FitzGerald (1971)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 224 leaves :col. ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references, discography and videography. Typescript.

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  • The Pounamu ultramafics : a study of metasomatism.

    Koons, Peter O. (1978)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    181 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • The Cromwell quartz reef area 1865-85 : a geographical analysis of rise and decline.

    Crombie, Gary O. (1974)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    199 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Food and feeding behaviour of the Black-fronted tern, Chlidonias hybrida albostriatus.

    Lalas, Chris (1977)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 108 leaves :col. ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Spine title: Feeding of Black-fronted terns. University of Otago department: Zoology.

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  • Land adjacent to water : public and private rights and restrictions.

    Gordon, Roderick Ian (1978)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vi, 73 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Workers' perceptions of industry, and their commitment to their union

    Coup, Owen (1974)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In the field of industrial sociology, little research has been done which views industry and the organisations associated with it, from the worker's perspective. There is agreement among those associated with the field in this country, that very little is known about the attitudes, perceptions and expectations that the New Zealand industrial worker has of industry, employer and job. It is important that research be done on the worker's views, since this would establish a better basis for our industrial relations policy. The present research was designed as an exploratory study, to examine workers' perceptions of their industry, their relationship with their employer, and their union. Essentially, there were two specific points considered. The first was an examination of the adequacy of Marxian theory as an explanation for the relationship that exists between employer and worker in the New Zealand industrial setting. The second was a preliminary analysis of the validity of a model, which attempts to predict the commitment of workers to their union, on the basis of certain preconditions which are outlined as a series of five stages. The research consisted of interviews with workers sampled from two unions in the Christchurch area. The analysis of the data did not use any sophisticated statistical techniques, since these were not appropriate for a preliminary study, or the size of the sample involved. The conclusions reached on the first point were, that although these workers do display certain characteristics that would be expected on the basis of a Marxian perspective, they also have other characteristics (notably an awareness of the interdependence of worker and employer), which Marxian theory cannot explain adequately. With regard to the model, the trends that it predicts definitely occur in this data, but the model does not account for all factors affecting the commitment of union members. It needs refinement and further, more rigorous, testing, before any final conclusion can be reached regarding its validity. As is appropriate for an exploratory study, a considerable number of suggestions for further research have been generated.

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  • The poetic novels of Thomas Hardy and George Meredith

    Pyke, Allen Francis (1973)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Criticism of the novels of Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) and George Meredith (1828-1909) has often concerned itself with the philosophy of, and biographical elements behind, the works. Because of this, Hardy's novels have often been considered largely as examples or inconsistently rendered theses on fatalism set in a rural framework, whilst those of Meredith as pretentious, obscure drawing-room comedies of love. Yet few critics refrain from acknowledging a qualified, largely undefined, greatness in these novels. Very little close textual analysis of these novels has yet been undertaken, and in this thesis four novels by each of these writers is to be subjected to a close textual analysis. The aim of this examination is to demonstrate that the use of language in these works is closer to that of poetry than that of conventional novels. Not only is meaning conveyed by a poetic use of language but the novels are structured poetically and a poetic vision informs them, so that the ultimate aim of this thesis is to prove that the novels of Thomas Hardy and George Meredith are essentially poetic. Whilst the "poetic" twentieth century novel seems to earn immediate critical acceptance, a general reluctance to acknowledge earlier examples of this form of novel seems to be common. Concentrating on one particular novel by each of these authors I hope to illustrate first its poetic qualities, then show how these are apparent in their other works, and finally I shall very briefly indicate the importance of their contribution to the development of “the poetic novel.”

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  • The veil removed : reality, ideality and dream in the later works of Robin Hyde

    Sharplin, Janscie Elizabeth (1971)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Short term economic load allocation : a report

    Turner, Michael Duncan (1971)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The method of equal incremental cost of received power is well established as a means or determining the most economic distribution of active power, while satisfying the power system load demand, subject to generation and water constraints. This report considers the concepts and implications of the method, in applying it to part, or all, of the New Zealand Power System. A digital computer program, developed as part of this report, is described which implements the method on a model of the South Island subsystem of the New Zealand Power System and provided the necessary computational experience to evaluate some of the important aspects of economic scheduling with this method.

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  • Comparability of language samples elicited in different situations from the same group of children

    Hanlon, Noel Norman (1973)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Language samples were elicited in six different situations from 20 five-year-old children (10 boys, 10 girls) in their first six months at Primary School. The samples of language were analyzed using a number of quantitative and qualitative measures. The qualitative measures used were the noun phrase index (NPI), verb phrase index (VPI), and length complexity index (LCI) developed by Shriner (1967). The data was also analyzed according to number of noun phrases, number of verb phrases, and total utterances. In the statistical treatment of the analyzed data, correlation coefficients were obtained between all possible pairs of situations and conditions on each of the quantitative and qualitative measures. A series of t tests was also computed between pairs of situations on each of these measures. The analysis of the results of the quantitative and qualitative measures indicated that the samples of language elicited in the six different situations were not comparable. Discussion of these results considered a range of factors that may have contributed to the differences noted. Factors related to the nature of the situations, the setting within which the language was elicited, and person factors, such as the effect of the experimenter and the effect of the mother, were considered. It was concluded that such factors as those mentioned above were integral aspects of the language situation worthy of equal consideration with the language elicited.

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  • The Solution to the problem of the individuation of actions

    Jones, Donald Robert (1973)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    How many possible answers are there to the problem of the individuation of actions? In this dissertation I shall confine myself to but two answers. I will not state categorically that there are no other lines of approach to the problem. I am, however, reasonably confident that no other line is at all feasible and that no one has formulated one. There is the possibility of blending the two answers with which I shall deal, but such a blending would at best be mere temporising. It should become obvious that the two answers are mutually antagonistic and that no such blending could be convincingly defended.

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  • The Spatial association of a doctor and his patients in Hamilton city

    Judd, Edward Walter Bruce (1971)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Information which has been diffused through a population about an idea has been accepted, and the idea adopted, by some members of the population under some circumstances (Hagerstrand, 1967.) The spatial relationship between a doctor and his patients in Hamilton City were examined to see if information about this particular doctor, when diffused through the urban residential area, had been the basis for a significant number of his patients attending his surgery rather than the surgery of the doctor nearest to them.

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  • Political ideas in the North Briton, 1762-1763: A 'Whig-country' view of the English Constitution

    Knight, Anthony Wallace (1972)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This dissertation examines the constitutional ideas and attitudes which emerge from the North Briton's view of the state of English politics in 1762-3. The object of the study has been to determine the nature of these ideas and attitudes, and their place in the stream of political and constitutional ideas that grew into what historians have described as eighteenth century ‘radicalism’. An examination of later seventeenth and eighteenth century political thought reveals that the constitutional concerns of the North Briton were entirely unoriginal. Its view of the constitution has been labelled ‘Whig country' because it is from both Whiggish ideas and attitudes, and from the long tradition of country' ideas and opposition to government, that the North Briton draws its own constitutional outlook. Like almost all politically aware Englishmen in the eighteenth century, the authors of the North Briton held that the constitution was balanced, and the liberty of the subject thereby guaranteed, by the equipoise of the constitution's three components - king, lords and commons. However, this idea was capable of different interpretations depending upon the political ends for which it was utilized. Almost all agreed the constitutional balance was in danger of upset, but men in opposition invariably disagreed with those in power as to the source of the danger. The North Briton, in opposition to the ministry of Lord Bute, clearly echoes the obsessive ‘country' fear of the corrupting influence of power in its charges that the administration is working in its own interests rather than in those of the people, and is thereby upsetting the balance of the constitution. The people are regarded as legitimate critics and even supervisors of government by the North Briton; their role being to restore the constitutional balance by ensuring that parliament properly represents the people. The North Briton's political solution to present problems is to get men they believe can be trusted to look after the people's interests back into power. Such men, it argues, are the Whigs (specifically Lord Temple) and William Pitt, whose ability and public esteem had previously been so amply demonstrated. The authors of the North Briton have no intention of upsetting the balance of the constitution in favour of the democratic element. Nevertheless, their emphasis on the role of the people has within it a potential for the development of later 'radical' ideas that came to view the people as an entity separate from the traditional parts of the constitution. Although the North Briton is on the verge of interpreting 'the people' as a separate entity, its retention of the Whig solution counters the 'radical' potential of its 'country• views. Thus in 1762-3 the North Briton continues to voice non-'radical' 'Whig-country' attitudes. By 1768 the Whigs and Pitt had demonstrated that they were incapable of providing a viable solution to contemporary problems. "The Continuation" of the North Briton, no longer inhibited by trust in a Whiggish solution, discards its conservative Whiggism, becomes wholly 'country' oriented, and by 1771 appears to be well and truly 'radical' in its demands for proportional representation and in its hints at support for a democratic franchise.

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  • Majesty in misery. Two pictorial sources of Andreas Gryphius's martyr play Carolus Stuardus

    Laaper, Hein (1977)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    In the annotations to his drama, Ermordete Majest ät Oder CAROLUS STUARDUS K önig von Gross Britanien, the Baroque dramatist Andreas Gryphius left no doubt about the fact that he consulted for his work both the Eikon Basilike Vel Imago Regis Caroli, which was first published in England in 1649, and the Vollst ändiges Englisches Memorial, which appeared in Holland early in the same year. When comparing these two historical sources with Carolus Stuardus one notices immediately the similarity of the content and form of the Englisches Memorial with Gryphius's drama. Less noticeable is the connection of the play with the King's book, Eikon Basilike, but Gryphius makes extensive reference to the text in the annotations of his play. The Eikon Basilike and the Englisches Memorial each contain an engraving whose significance for the martyr play has been underestimated until recently. The engravings in question are the depiction of the royal martyr, Charles I, in the Eikon Basilike as well as the pictorial representation of the last moments of the monarch ' s life and his execution from the Englisches Memorial.

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  • Aggregate investment behaviour in New Zealand: An examination of the theory of investment behaviour and its econometric representation

    Lichtwark, Philip Laurence (1973)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    In this study an attempt is made to construct a model explaining quarterly investment in plant and machinery in the New Zealand economy, with a view to providing a basis for forecasting investment expenditures. A survey of theory and econometric models reveals that in the more successful overseas models the principle determinants of investment expenditures are changes in demand as reflected output changes, the capital stock, which gives an indication of existing capacity and determines replacement requirements, and also factors affecting the cost of capital equipment. These factors form the basis of the theory of investment behaviour. However it is found that the pure theoretical framework, although useful, does not provide a complete explanation of investment in New Zealand, and that such factors as import controls and other exogenous influences affect investment in this country. The final model purports to explain ninety three per cent of the variation in investment expenditures and is statistically sound. This was considered a good result in view of the data problems encountered. Although the model is not entirely satisfactory the equation performed reasonably well in ex-poste forecasts which suggests that with some improvements, particularly of some of the data series, it could provide a useful indication of the effects of policy measures on investment.

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  • Morality and the criminal law: an examination of some recent attempts to define theoretical limits to the proper scope of the criminal law

    Macdonald, Douglas Alan (1972)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The aim of this essay is to show that any attempt to define theoretical limits to the proper scope of the criminal law must fail. In Chapter 1 an attempt is made to refute the Wolfenden Committee's contention that society must recognise 'a realm of private morality and immorality which is … not the law's business.' In so far as his arguments also pursue this aim Lord Devlin' s thesis is defended but no attempt is made to defend all that he said. Briefly, the argument advanced asserts that, if it is accepted that any society has the right to take whatever steps it considers necessary to ensure its continued survival then no jurisdictional barrier, such as that proposed by the Wolfenden Committee can be erected, owing to the public nature of all conduct. In other words, if by ' private morality and immorality ' is meant ' private behaviour in matters of morals' then there is no sphere of morality which can be distinguished on the ground that it has no public effect. The argument that there can be no theoretical limits placed on the proper scope of the law does not commit one to holding that all immoral conduct ought to be prohibited by law but rather that any immoral conduct may justifiably be prohibited.

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  • The Origin of overland flow in Otutaru Catchment

    Pittams, Richard John (1971)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Data collected from 14 runoff plots and Otutaru catchment indicate that there is a very close relationship between runoff measured at the plots, and rates and volumes recorded at the outlet from Otutaru catchment. This ' relationship is dependent principally on rainfall intensity and is influenced by soil moisture conditions before and during a storm. The influence of aspect, storm direction and wind speed are analysed and it is deduced that they are minor influences on runoff. It is concluded that overland flow is generated throughout Otutaru catchment when rain of sufficient intensity occurs. Initially the bulk of this flow is lost by infiltration in the valley bottom but after rain of a certain volume or sufficient intensity has fallen the whole catchment appears to contribute to Otutaru runoff. The slopes produce relatively greater flow, but all areas contribute significantly to catchment runoff.

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  • A Pilot survey of the attitudes towards industrial psychology of managers, personal officers and management consultants in New Zealand

    Place, Helen Ivy (1971)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The application of psychological principles and techniques to the work situation has been well documented (Dunnette & Kirchner (1965), Tiffin & McCormack (1966), Blum & Naylor (1968), Kolasa (1969), Korman (1971). There are however few studies which provide some understanding of attitudes towards industrial psychology and these are limited to the United States. (Feinperg & Lefkowitz (1962), Thornton (1969). In spite of the increasing number of management consultant firms in this country there is little information about the application of psychological principles to the New Zealand industrial scene. In order to gain some understanding of the current status and scope of industrial psychology, it was decided to investigate the attitudes of personnel officers, managers and management consultants.

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