12 results for 1970, Undergraduate

  • Jurassic sediments at Chaslands mistake.

    Geary, Geoffrey Clive (1976)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 34 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology

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  • A city in transition : diversification in the social life of Dunedin, 1860-1864.

    McCarthy, M. P. (1977)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 133 leaves :ill., facsim. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 128-133.

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  • Bryce v. Rusden : the vindication of a colony.

    Clendon, W. Ross (1973)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    PREFACE John Bryce was Minister of Native Affairs in New Zealand during the early 1880’s. Perhaps the first note-worthy point about him is his comparative obscurity, but when his name is recognised it is usually in connection with the leading role he played in the invasion of the Maori village of Parihaka in 1881. Later generations have come to regard that episode as cause for regret and even shame on the part of the Pakeha, and as evidence of the harshness and injustice which seems to have characterised so much of the colonists’ treatment of the Maoris. Some of Bryce’s contemporaries, especially those in England, also saw the Parihaka affair in this light, none more so than George William Rusden. His History of New Zealand, published in 1883, was a savage and lengthy indictment of the colony’s native policies over forty years, in particular of those policies pursued by John Bryce. Some of the aspersions made by Rusden against “the bully of Parihaka” were to result in the libel action of Bryce v. Rusden which was fought in London in 1886. When John Bryce sailed for England to vindicate his good name before a British judge and jury, he had behind him the moral support of his fellow colonists in New Zealand. They saw Bryce as being on a mission to defend not only his honour but also the honour of the colony as a whole; his cause was theirs also. This essay attempts to demonstrate the extent to which Bryce was regarded as a spokesman for all the colonists in New Zealand, and an effort has been made to determine just how successful he was in removing a stigma from the colony. It is also hoped that in the course of the essay some better understanding may be reached of John Bryce as a man and as a colonist and not merely as the plaintiff in the action. For, as both his detractors and his admirers would concede, John Bryce was a man who probably came closer than any of his political colleagues to typifying the ordinary colonist of his day. He was, in fact, the settler personified.

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  • Swaggers and society : a New Zealand experience

    Steven, Graeme D. (1979)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    The aims of this study are two-fold. First, to reach an understanding of the swagger, his lifestyle, and his outlook on life. And second, to investigate the relationships between the swagger and various groups in New Zealand society, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The North Otago region was chosen as a base for the study because it has traditionally been regarded as one of the main swagger areas in New Zealand. The main town of Oamaru had a population of 4000 to 6000 in the 1890's, and was neither wholly urban or rural. As the service centre for the North Otago hinterland and a road, rail and sea centre, Oamaru had large numbers of itinerants, passing through the town. In the rural hinterland mixed cropping predominated, and this required large numbers of seasonal workers, which were drawn from outside the region. In Chapter One it is argued that rural itinerant workers were integrated into a rural structure that was both labour intensive and seasonal. Chapter Two discusses the characteristics which separate the swagger from other rural itinerants, which I have called, the "swag-carriers". In Chapter Three the conflict between the swagger and a developing bureaucracy, and middle class ideology in the late nineteenth century, is analysed. In Chapters Four and Five, the attitudes of rural and towns people towards the swagger are investigated. A model based on the value system of "reputation" and "respectability is used in Chapter Six to explain the ambivalence of attitudes towards the swagger, and to investigate an important aspect of the swagger psychology - his self esteem and his individuality.

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  • The Public Safety Conservation Act.

    Logan, Alastair John (1976)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    70 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Long essay.

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  • Milton, the rural depression experience

    Panjabi, Jayashree (1979)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: iv, 65 leaves : photo (fold.) ; 30 cm. Notes: Tapes of the interviews accompany this thesis. Not to be quoted without the author's permission. Bibliography: leaves 61-65.

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  • Structure, stratigraphy and metamorphism in the upper Hakataramea valley area, South Canterbury, New Zealand

    Fagan, Robert Keith (1971)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    vi, 73 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • Geology of the Lake Roe area, Southern Fiordland New Zealand

    Bowman, R. G. (1974)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 54 leaves :col. ill., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • An exercise in perception

    Clairmont, Philip A (1970)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Subject chosen for this thesis is the interior of a room and its myriad aspects. When experienced subjectively it can appear as an outer protection or barrier for inner turmoil, providing security, shelter and privacy, or the direct opposite, four walls unnaturally imprisoning that which should be free. Objectively it provides a startling array of forms shapes and textures, both functional and nonfunctional, rigid and organic. The visual tensions influence and condition the actions and thoughts of the human figure within this environment. A room contains within its four walls residue of human thoughts, actions and emotions, a visual catalyst of memories and associations ; past and present. A room is in a constant state of evolution expressing itself in movements from light and dark - a place where time and space can be measurable. I have tried using a variety of means: signs and symbols, dots, dashes, line and tone to capture at once the stationary together with the transitory nature of observed appearances. I have dwelt on and emphasised those ambiguities which have arisen out of the process of creating an image and may reveal something of another reality.... of those submerged realities behind appearances and beyond normal consciousness. The language of an artist is able to cast a glimmer of light on those essential truths.....truths which normally elude civilised man. This thesis provides for sensory and visual appreciation rather than intellectual gratification (thus the emphasis on visual rather than written work). It comprises of a series of drawings, covering some aspects of one particular interior .... in this instance, my livingroom - an immediate environment. The drawings are essentially a visual record of sensory thinking, emotional and free-form imaginative interpretation of commonplace objects. The drawings follow a sequence, both chronologically and in thought development towards painting in which the experience gained of the room, crystallises in paint, size and colour adding dimension. The drawings should perform a dual role, one of providing a direct link with unconscious creative processes, and one of showing a developing awareness of the vital forces and movements that motivate a painting and validate the act of creating it. A variety of techniques have been used, each in its turn revealing some significant facet of the interior. Mixed media drawings predominate, for this media with its own unique properties, is capable of providing a bridge ..... an interlocking of concept and technique where image and media are inseparable.

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  • A century of land tenure on the Benmore Sheep Station.

    Mains, N. J. (1976)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    19 p., [2] leaves of plates :ill. ; 27 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The geology of the Homestead stream area, Lower Hakataramea Valley, South Canterbury

    Morton, Malcolm Russell (1971)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 93 leaves :maps ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 88-91. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • The geology and eruptive history of the Table Mountain region, Coromandel Peninsula

    Hayward, Bruce W. (Bruce William) (1971)

    Undergraduate thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Table Mountain region covers an area of 2,200 hectares, 17 kilometres north-east of Thames, and straddles the main Coromandel Peninsula Divide between the headwaters of the Kauaeranga and Waiwawa Rivers. It is a region of steeply dissected, bush clad slopes and rugged bluffs composed of andesite, rhyolite and sediments. These rocks belong to three Groups. The oldest group of rocks consists of andesite lavas, breccias and sediments that form the upper part of the Beesons Island Volcanics sequence and were erupted during the upper Miocene and lowermost Pliocene. Unconformably overlying these is the mid Pliocene Whitianga Group containing rhyolitic lavas and sediments. In the Table Mt. Region this Group has been divided into the Minden Rhyolites and two informal sedimentary formations. The Wainora Formation contains basal volcanic breccias and freshwater, carbonaceous, epiclastic sediments that were deposited in two lakes on the dissected surface of the older andesites. This formation contains impressions of fresh-water mussels and numerous leaves, as well as considerable amounts of silicified wood. Conformably overlying the Wainora Formation are the thicker and more extensive water and aerially deposited pyroclastic sediments and rarer ignimbrites of the Waiwawa Formation. Many of the water laid deposits are inferred to have been formed by hot pyroclastic flows entering a lake. Minden Rhyolite domes were produced, by endogenous and exogenous growth, towards the end of this phreatic eruptive period. Hydrothermal alteration is inferred to be closely associated with the four Minden Rhyolite domes of this region. During the upper Pliocene to lower Pleistocene, the Omahia Andesite Group was intruded. The narrow Waiwawa Intrusive came up along an old intrusive contact between a Minden Rhyolite dome and the Waiwawa Formation sediments. The large Table Mt. andesite mass is believed to have formed by a combination of upwelling of lava along a fissure and actual intrusion. Both the Waiwawa and Table Mt. Intrusives spilled small amounts of lava out over the surface as lava flows. In the two million years since the cessation of volcanic activity in this region, erosion has greatly altered the landscape and emphasized the harder rock masses.

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