608 results for 1990, Masters

  • He kupu tuku iho mo tenei reanga : Te ahua o te tuku korero

    Higgins, Rawinia Ruth (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    170 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies. "March 1999."

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  • Telling our professional stories

    Alterio, Maxine (1998)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    [6], 138 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Supervision and the culture of general practice

    Wilson, Hamish John (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Supervision is a well-known and well-theorised activity in some professions where experienced practitioners contract to facilitate, guide or educate the novice. Supervision is uncommon in medicine, which has traditionally employed more didactic teaching processes. In the general practice community in New Zealand, practitioners use a variety of methods of professional maintenance, with educative mentoring or supervision being a recent innovation. In this form of supervision, general practitioners (GPs) discuss their work with an experienced supervisor, with one focus being to learn counselling or psychotherapy skills. This study examined the experiences of GPs who use supervision, with particular reference to how supervision impacts on their practice of medicine. The context for this inquiry included the background philosophical assumptions of the biomedical paradigm, current problems in clinical practice and the culture of general practice in New Zealand. The research used a qualitative methodology, with seven GP respondents being interviewed at length about their use of supervision. A focus group with four of the participants followed initial analysis of the individual interviews. Interviews and group discussion were analysed within a social constructivist paradigm. The respondents' stories of learning about supervision led to the construction of a collective story. This could be outlined under the four broad themes of dissonance and exploration, self-awareness and professional development, the supervised practice, and defining supervision in general practice. However, before these GPs could make effective use of supervision, they needed to work through a number of personal and cultural barriers. The findings of the research suggest that supervision is a powerful method of learning, being an embodied experience through the supervisor-doctor relationship. Some of these GPs used their supervisor to learn how to do psychotherapy in general practice. The supervisor also acted as sounding board for all the respondents to discuss other work issues, such as practice management and peer relationships. One outcome of regular supervision was validation about their work, contributing to a heightened sense of self in the work environment. Supervision facilitated a model of reflective learning that is relatively uncommon in medicine. This was achieved through rigorous attention to self-awareness, resulting in facilitated career development. In a supervised practice, the GP incorporates an increasing acuity for patients' psychological problems. There is an emphasis on the doctor-patient relationship, with awareness of the roles and boundaries around the GP’s work. Supervision was seen to be different to work in peer-groups or in personal psychotherapy, but there were similarities. The role of the supervisor was defined to include sub-roles of teacher, facilitator, analyst and evaluator. In this study there was invariably no form of summative evaluation. The results led to a definition of supervision in general practice. Studying these successful supervisor-doctor relationships gave unique insights into the barriers that prevent further utilisation of supervision or other forms of mentoring in general practice. These barriers include broad issues of the traditional epistemological assumptions of modern medicine. Having supervision appeared to have a major impact on the style of medical practice that is exhibited by these GPs. There are implications of these findings for both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. This research was grounded in a social constructivist paradigm that linked theory, research and clinical practice. From the evidence presented here, these practitioners have incorporated biomedicine into a wider medical model that offers a resolution to the current paradigmatic crisis of modern medicine.

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  • The failure of corporate failure models to classify and predict : aspects and refinements

    Alexander, P. B. (1991)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Much has been written about the use of multiple discriminant analysis in corporate distress classification and forecasting. Classification and prediction models are notoriously difficult to establish in such a way that they will stand the ultimate test of time. Many articles severely criticise the use of the technique yet there are aspects which may improve our ability to develop satisfactory models. We are probably yet a long way off from being able to do so with any great degree of satisfaction, yet it behoves us to try to develop models that do justice to the assumptions and the theory. This thesis explores several important aspects of the model-building process and concludes that some of the more conventional criticisms of the models developed so far are less important than claimed. It suggests that more critical than the failure to meet the conditions of multivariate normality, the equality of the variance-covariance matrices, and the use of a priori probabilities are the need for: a satisfactory model specification that can be theoretically justified, the strict use of random sampling, the efficient use of sample data, the search for stable mean vectors which are significantly different from each other, and ex ante validation. If these requirements are met then the MDA technique is robust enough to cope with breaches of the assumptions.

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  • Grave doubts : an anatomy of funeral rituals in a New Zealand context

    Lawrence, Victoria (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 81 leaves :col. ill., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 73-81) University of Otago department: Anthropology. "April 1995."

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  • Petrology and geochemistry of alkaline and granitoid intrusions, Pipecleaner Glacier region, Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Hall, Charlotte Elizabeth (1991)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    122 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • Exploring educational efficiency in New Zealand primary and post-primary schooling, 1900-1945

    Frost, Anna Kathleen (1998)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 83 leaves :col. ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Education. "March 31, 1998."

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  • Reproduction and population genetics of the New Zealand brooding brittle star Ophiomyxa brevirima

    Garrett, Frank Kim (1994)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 133 leaves :ill. (some col.) :30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "December 1994." University of Otago department: Marine Science

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  • Re-colonisation of a relocated boulder reef in Tauranga Harbour, New Zealand

    Graeme, Lindsay Megan (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    109, xi leaves :music ; 27 cm. Bibliography: p. x-xi. University of Otago department: Marine Science. "March 1995."

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  • Biology of the sea pen Pteroeides sp. in Fiordland, New Zealand

    Duncan, Joanne Claire (1998)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    281 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography. "August 1998". University of Otago department: Marine Science.

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  • On the edge : a history of adventure sports and adventure tourism in Queenstown

    Brown, Michael Neal Rowatt (1997)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xvi, 219 leaves :col. ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Lighthouses of New Zealand: a bright tourism opportunity

    Berryman, Rebecca (1998)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 133 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Tourism. Cover title. "August 1998" -- Cover.

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  • A stylish revolution : the fourth Labour government and information management

    Burke, Fay Ann (1992)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 190 leaves Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies.

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  • The Crown Minerals Act 1991 and the Resource Management Act 1991 : comprehensive and integrated management of mineral resources?

    Crang, Nicholas (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xvi, 158 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Law.

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  • The state and income redistribution: a study of the social wage and taxation in New Zealand 1949-1975

    Reveley, J. W. C. (1990)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis examines the role of the state in redistributing income between social classes in New Zealand during the years 1949-1975. It applies an innovative methodology, developed by E. Ahmet Tonak, to a set of data drawn from New Zealand's national accounts and estimates a quantity labelled 'net-tax', defined as the taxes that the working class cede to the state less the expenditure that the working class receives from the state in the form of a social wage. A detailed theoretical discussion precedes the empirical analysis. Insofar as Tonak's method requires that the social wage (the portion of state expenditure consumed by the working class) be identified as an empirical quantity, the argument that all taxes, and hence all state expenditures, originate from surplus value is confronted. The views of the main representatives of this contemporary school of thought are subjected to detailed scrutiny. They are rejected in favour of the views of a school which considers the portion of taxes funding the state expenditure that constitutes the social wage to originate in 'wages'. A model which theoretically 'grounds' the comparison of taxes paid to state expenditure received, effected in the remaining chapters of this study, is then formulated. In the empirical analysis, the empirical referent of the 'net-tax' concept is calculated for the years 1949-1975. The net-tax data set is then used to construct a transference ratio, which indicates the degree and direction of income redistribution effected by the state. The main finding to emerge is that, in all but one of the twenty-seven years surveyed in this study, the working class has surrendered more wealth in taxes to the state than it has received back from the state as a social wage. In light of these results, it can be concluded that the welfare state has not materially benefitted the working class in New Zealand. Moreover, insofar as income has consistently been redistributed from the working class to 'non-labour' (the capitalist class and the state itself), the state can be considered to owe the working class a debt in the amount of 3671.26 million (constant 1975) dollars.

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  • The impact of the Internet on small firms

    Martin, Ross A. (1998)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Several researchers have designed frameworks to model and analyse impacts of the Internet on firms. This research takes one such framework aimed at small firms (Lymer et al., 1997b) and attempts to validate its usefulness by comparing it to similar and conflicting models, and by applying it to impacts collected from both the literature and from four case studies of small firms. The findings suggest that several changes to Lymer et al.'s (1997b) framework are necessary to make the model more effective and more practical for researchers and practitioners. A revised Internet impacts model is proposed that incorporates these changes. Preliminary evaluation has been performed on the revised model, resulting in the conclusion that the study makes a valuable contribution to the area of Internet research by significantly enhancing the usability and analytical usefulness of Lymer et al.'s (1997b) Internet impacts model.

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  • Ideological choice in the gravestones of Dunedin's Southern Cemetery

    Edgar, Philip Gerard (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xxv, 136 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Anthropology. "December 1995."

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  • The nutrient and photosynthetic eco-physiology of Undaria pinnatifida, with applications to aquaculture

    Dean, Paul Robert (1998)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiii, 173 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Marine Science.

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  • A voice of her own : Ethel Smyth and early feminist musicology

    Emerson, Helen Katrine (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 180 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Music.

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  • Conceptions of motherhood and how they affect the way surrogacy is viewed and regulated

    Ericsson, Deborah Nancy (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 99 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "25 March 1999"

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