107 results for 2000, Undergraduate

  • Ngati Apa: Legally sound but bravely apolitical

    Dunlop, Jane (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    University of Otago department: Law.

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  • A world of (linguistic) possibility : the rights-consistent interpretive directives of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and the United Kingdom Human Rights Act 1998

    Fenton, Bridget (2007)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 89 leaves :col. ill., maps (some folded) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-89) University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Climate change and the water yield of snow tussock grasslands in the Upper Taieri Catchment

    Cameron, Janine (2004)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 66 leaves :ill., facsim., maps, ports. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 63-66). University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Falling branches, dying roots? : bank branch closure in small towns

    McKirdy, Callum Blair (2000)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 140 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 134-140. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Dawn and Te Ao Hou : popular perspectives on assimilation and integration, 1950s-1960s

    Chan, Michael Adam (2008)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 90 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-90). University of Otago departments: History and Political Studies.

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  • The political lessons of Tomorrow's schools : what can be learnt from the outcomes and implications of Tomorrow's schools

    Connew, Scott Joseph (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 64 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies. "October 2003."

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  • Management and allocation of fresh water in New Zealand:

    Bartrum, Lisa Cherie (2004)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    93 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 69-80). University of Otago department: Law.

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  • The hill of health : aspects of community at Waipiata Sanatorium 1923-1961

    Haugh, Susan Margaret (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    102 leaves, [21] p. of plates :ill., facsim., map, ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 101-102.

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  • The University of Otago's Home Science Extension Service, 1929-1954

    Clarke, Katherine Mary (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    The Home Science Extension Service (HSES) of the Otago University was established in 1929. The Service intended to remedy a lack in the educational facilities available for rural women. The HSES developed from the example of the rural educational work in the United States. The founders hoped that home science instruction could reduce many of the hardships and problems of rural domestic life. They wanted to improve health standards through dietary advice and educating women about cleanliness. They believed instruction about efficient homemaking techniques could reduce the toil of rural women. They also wanted to provide a source of enjoyment, by offering leisure activities and mental stimulation. The extension of home science teaching into the community needs to be seen in the wider context of two international movements, adult education and home science. New Zealand adult education largely developed from the British adult education system, while the American model of home economics inspired New Zealand's tradition of home science. The HSES fused these international themes in a New Zealand experiment into the possibilities for rural adult education. […] This investigation covers the founding of the HSES and its first twenty-five years of operation, from 1929 to 1954. The period ends in 1954 partly because this confines the study to the time before feminist movements began to openly challenge the belief that a woman's proper role was to be a homemaker. It is appropriate to study an organisation which helped women with homemaking during a period when many believed that this was to be their destiny. The twenty-five year period also encompasses three phases in the HSES's development: the 'Carnegie period'; the 'war years'; and the 'adult education era'. The changes within the HSES during these years provide insights into wider developments in New Zealand society. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Desperate measures : murder, marriage and the media, 1900-1939

    McNair, Alexandra (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    91 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy). "1 October, 2003."

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  • The other class of women : maternity services available for destitute women in Dunedin, c.1886-1897

    McKay, Willow Reay (2002)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    98 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Domestic disquiet? : New Zealand responses to conflict in Malaya/Malaysia 1954-1966

    Sargison, Georgina (2006)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 89 leaves, [9] leaves of plates :ill., facisms., ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 84-89. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • The Queenstown-Lakes District rural residential development debate : an analysis on the current debate about protecting outstanding natural landscapes and controlling rural residential development in the Wakatipu Basin

    Baudet, François Eugene Nicholas (2001)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    80 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Surveying.

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  • Loving our national parks to death

    Mann, Amber (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 91 leaves :col. ill., plan ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Alpine fault pseudotachylytes

    Ritchie, Samuel David (2009)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xvii, 171 leaves :col. ill., maps30 cm Includes bibliographical references. "October 2009". University of Otago department: Geology

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  • The geology of the Round Hill area, upper Hakataramea Valley

    Falconer, Mark Lloyd (2000)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 79 [7] leaves ; 26 cm. Bibliography: l. [84-86] University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • Mai i ngā Ao e Rua – From Two Worlds : An investigation into the attitudes towards half castes in New Zealand

    Boyes, Suzanne (2006-10)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    This dissertation investigates the attitudes of others’ experienced by ‘half-caste’ or bi-ethnic people of New Zealand, that is, people who have both Māori and Pākehā heritage. The dissertation combines the personal narratives of four half-caste people, my own story, and historical/theoretical literature to illuminate this subject. The dissertation introduces the topic by firstly, discussing the current identity politics in New Zealand, which has tended to dominate the political landscape as of late, and left half-caste people between the crossfire. Secondly, I introduce part of my own story as a half-caste person in New Zealand. In Chapter one, the pre-colonial origins of attitudes towards race, intermarriage and miscegenation are examined through an analysis of religious and scientific discourses. Chapter Two provides a basic understanding of Māori and Pākehā identity as separate entities, with the aim of demonstrating the binary opposites that have informed attitudes towards half-castes in New Zealand. The third chapter outlines a number of themes regarding attitudes towards the half caste people I interviewed as part of this research. The final chapter brings together literature and interview material through the lens of a Bill of Rights for Racially Mixed People to provide an approach for looking towards the future of half-caste identity politics.

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  • Kia tū ko taikākā: Let the heartwood of Māori identity stand - An investigation into the appropriateness of the legal definition of ‘Māori’ for Māori

    Coates, Natalie (2008)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the degree of Bachelor of Arts (Honours), in Māori Studies at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

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  • Kā Uri ā Papatūānuku: An investigation of pre-contact resource management in Te Wāi Pounamu

    Mules, Rangimarie (2007-10)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Is the common perception that all indigenous peoples are innately harmonious a true depiction of reality? This research project aims to diffuse this theory. Its prime focus is to explore this notion of conservation in relation to southern Māori, and how, or if, such norms did indeed evolve within pre-contact southern Māori society. Upon arrival into the less biddable environment of Te Wāi Pounamu life proved to be very difficult for these Polynesian voyagers. Te Wāi Pounamu, a land beyond the reaches of tropical Polynesia, gave a whole new meaning to adaptation. Initial settlement was by no means an easy task, however with persistence, cultural divergence transpired. What once were Polynesian voyagers, at home on the ocean, became a uniquely shaped people in accordance to the environmental circumstance of Te Wāi Pounamu. Cultural concepts derived from Polynesia were adapted to give explanation to the new phenomena of Te Wāi Pounamu. Through implementation of such belief systems into everyday life, southern Māori developed a balance between human and their environment. The central aim of this dissertation is to explore the past in order to give meaning to the future. It examines how southern Māori may have adapted their physical, spiritual and cognitive development to suit the environment in which they dwelt, consequently suggesting that the land influenced humans more than humans may have influenced the land.

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  • Māori Perspectives on the Foreshore and Seabed Debate: A Dunedin Case Study

    Suszko, Abby (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    On 19 June 2003, the Court of Appeal ruled that the Māori Land Court had the power to decide foreshore and seabed claims lodged by Māori and to determine ownership. The decision also ruled that the Crown’s assumption of sovereignty was radical and thus it did not extinguish Māori title to land, including the foreshore and seabed. Although not a revolutionary decision, the Court’s ruling launched the nation into a fierce debate, bringing up the issues of beach access and ownership, public interest, customary usage, rights and title, aboriginal, or native, title, Indigenous rights, ‘the public domain’, Crown authority and the Treaty of Waitangi. All these arguments became entwined with political considerations. The mainstream media widely broadcast claims that Māori would restrict access, alienate the foreshore and seabed and veto development, resulting in fear from many Pākehā that they had lost their right to go to the beach. The Government reacted severely, choosing to change the law so to place the foreshore and seabed in Crown hands. Although the mainstream media acknowledged that the majority of Māori were against the proposed legislation, the reasons for this were never explained. Through this dissertation I will show that there is a plethora of reasons for Māori dissension. I also argue that for Māori, the key issues in the debate are not those portrayed in the mainstream media.

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