108 results for 2000, Undergraduate

  • Investigation of Potentially Expansive Soils, 'The Birches' Subdivision, Rangiora, New Zealand

    Clendon, Nicholas (2001)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    'The Birches' is a recently developed subdivision in the township of Rangiora. Early in 1997 a Benkelman Beam test on Lowes Place, one of the two major access roads into 'The Birches', produced deflection results as high as 12.76 mm. In addition to this was the raising of a section of footpath 10-20 mm up from the curb. Early 1998 saw longitudinal shrinkage cracks appear in a house access driveway, while later in 1998 two house experienced cracking and movement of the interior wall linings, subsequently requiring redecoration. These types of damage are typical of the damage caused by expansive soils, and an investigation was put in place to evaluate these potentially expansive soils. There are no previous cases of swelling soil problems in Rangiora or on the Canterbury Plains, so a field investigation program using crack monitoring, shallow moisture pits and trenches was implemented. A range of samples were gathered from three trenches, including bulk, long and short tube, and block samples. The laboratory methods for analysing these samples included a scanning electron microscope for the identification of microscopic layering, the plotting of grading curves to establish grain distribution, the establishment of dry density, and laterally confined vertical swell levels. The aim of this was to establish both a cause, and the controlling factors of the observed soil volume expansion. The trenches revealed massive, homogenous, silty clay units, with numerous rootlets throughout. The SEM study showed no layering or bedding to be present, but showed evidence of possible bioturbation or leaching. XRD analysis discerned the clay mineralogy was, on average, 20% kaolinite and 80% muscovite. Both of these are very stable minerals, and showed no swelling properties when glycolated. This indicates the causes of volume expansion in these soils are structural. Remoulded samples were also tested, and proved to be more susceptible to volume expansion when moisture content was increased. This is because the process of remoulding destroys the stablility of the lattice structure of the soil, which has formed through repetition of the shrink/swell process. The presence of leaching and bioturbation, and the presence of kaolinite, indicates acidic leaching. The historical data, combined with the evidence of previously high levels of vegetation in the area, as indicated by the presence of rootlets in the silty clay unit, suggests the depositional environment was that of a swamp margin.

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  • Comparison of ground invertebrate assemblages across two types of natve forest fragment edge.

    Seldon, David (2002-06)

    Undergraduate thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Molecular phylogenetics of Antarctic Sea spiders (Pycnogonida)

    Nielsen, Johanna Fønss (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Whole document restricted, but available by request, use the feedback form to request access. Sea spiders, or pycnogonids, are a unique group of exclusively marine invertebrates that are found worldwide. A scarcity of pycnogonid research is reflected in the unclear position of this group with regards to the phylum Arthropoda and lack of certainty in their family-level phylogeny. Traditionally, the pycnogonid phylogeny has relied on the external morphological characters of temperate, shallow water species. The Antarctic sea spider fauna displays a high degree of endemism and a number of species have the potential to address several long-standing questions regarding the pycnogonid evolution. This research uses new sequence data from Antarctic species to provide the most complete molecular phylogenetic reconstructions of the Pycnogonida, and is the first study to formally test a number of alternative hypotheses on the interfamilial relationships of this group of organisms. The BioRoss 2004 pycnogonid collection was classified into 18 different OTUs (5 families & 10 genera) and used, in combination with publicly accessible sequences, to provide samples for this study. Partial regions of the nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA, mitochondrial 12S and 16S rDNA and protein coding COI loci were sequenced for each dataset, and the concatenated data tested for incongruence using the Partition of Homogeneity test. The distance based Neighbour Joining and character based Maximum Likelihood tree-building algorithms were used to reconstruct the pycnogonid phylogeny for each locus independently and as a concatenated dataset. A series of alternative evolutionary hypotheses based on previous studies were examined via the Shimodaira-Hasegawa test. The primary hypothesis examined was the cephalic appendage reductive trend, which implies that ancestral sea spider taxa possess the greatest complexity of anterior appendages. On all the individual locus trees the family Nymphonidae were the earliest diverged lineage of pycnogonids, although low resolution at the roots of the trees implies that the data are not strong enough to reject an alternative hypothesis of a basal Ammotheidae group. Pycnogonidae is not the most recently derived sea spider family and the cephalic appendage loss hypothesis is thus rejected. None of the phylogenies supported a close relationship between the Colossendeidae and Nymphonidae families and doubt is raised over the true identification of several GenBank sequences. Polymerous species do not form a combined, ancestral group but are instead more likely to represent recent divergences from three separate families. Strong evidence supports the placement of the transient Austropallene genus (Callipallenidae) at the base of the Nymphonidae family. This study, and ongoing work, has generated large amounts of new sequence data. This can be used in future pycnogonid phylogenetic research and/or in investigations on the highly contentious position of the Pycnogonida with regards to the phylum Arthropoda. A DNA Surveillance website has been created to assist in the molecular identification of pycnogonids from future benthic bio-discovery expeditions (http://www.dna-surveillance.auckland.ac.nz).

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  • Access to irrigation water : private property rights applied to water

    Milmine, Craig A. (2000)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    58 leaves, [3] leaves of plates :ill., maps ; 27 cm. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • The hill of health : aspects of community at Waipiata Sanatorium 1923-1961

    Haugh, Susan Margaret (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    102 leaves, [21] p. of plates :ill., facsim., map, ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 101-102.

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  • Loving our national parks to death

    Mann, Amber (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 91 leaves :col. ill., plan ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Alpine fault pseudotachylytes

    Ritchie, Samuel David (2009)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xvii, 171 leaves :col. ill., maps30 cm Includes bibliographical references. "October 2009". University of Otago department: Geology

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  • "As easy as 1-2-3" : the introduction of TV3 to the New Zealand television industry

    McCauley, Craig (2000)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    vi, 67 leaves :ill., maps, port. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 64-67). Typescript (photocopy).

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  • The political lessons of Tomorrow's schools : what can be learnt from the outcomes and implications of Tomorrow's schools

    Connew, Scott Joseph (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 64 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies. "October 2003."

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  • 'Je pense, donc je suis les traces' : a literary and historical analysis of the enlightenment, modernity and detective fiction in French

    Caswell, Erin Hubbard (2006)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    ii, 25 leaves ; 29 cm. Bibliography: leaves 19-20. University of Otago department: French. "October 2006."

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  • A world of (linguistic) possibility : the rights-consistent interpretive directives of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and the United Kingdom Human Rights Act 1998

    Fenton, Bridget (2007)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 89 leaves :col. ill., maps (some folded) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-89) University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Ngati Apa: Legally sound but bravely apolitical

    Dunlop, Jane (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Climate change and the water yield of snow tussock grasslands in the Upper Taieri Catchment

    Cameron, Janine (2004)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 66 leaves :ill., facsim., maps, ports. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 63-66). University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Dawn and Te Ao Hou : popular perspectives on assimilation and integration, 1950s-1960s

    Chan, Michael Adam (2008)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 90 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-90). University of Otago departments: History and Political Studies.

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  • The other class of women : maternity services available for destitute women in Dunedin, c.1886-1897

    McKay, Willow Reay (2002)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    98 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Falling branches, dying roots? : bank branch closure in small towns

    McKirdy, Callum Blair (2000)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 140 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 134-140. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Well-intentioned but ill-fated : the New Zealand Government's repatriation scheme for World War One returned soldiers, 1915-1930

    Neal, Sarah (2001)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    19 p., [2] leaves of plates :ill. ; 27 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy). "October 2001."

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  • Domestic disquiet? : New Zealand responses to conflict in Malaya/Malaysia 1954-1966

    Sargison, Georgina (2006)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 89 leaves, [9] leaves of plates :ill., facisms., ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 84-89. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • The Queenstown-Lakes District rural residential development debate : an analysis on the current debate about protecting outstanding natural landscapes and controlling rural residential development in the Wakatipu Basin

    Baudet, François Eugene Nicholas (2001)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    80 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Surveying.

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  • Parents, siblings and pacifism : the Baxter family and others (World War One and World War Two)

    Cumming, Belinda C. (2007)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Before she died, Millicent Baxter, wife of notorious New Zealand conscientious objector Archibald Baxter, wrote a letter confessing one of her final wishes: “I hope to live long enough to see the production of the documentary of my husband's book, We Will Not Cease ... I think it has a message for the young. The future of the world is in their hands …” Clearly pacifism was a shared commitment in her family, not just the passion of one individual member. This essay will seek to explore the importance of family in a pacifist stance. I will examine influences of, and effects on, various members of the family unit, and investigate the importance of familial support in aiding a conscientious objector to take the pacifist stance and cope with the consequent hardships confronted. My dissertation examines both the first and second World Wars. This focus on the family distinguishes my research from scholarship which precedes it.(…)While available scholarship provides a significant wealth of detail on conscientious objection in New Zealand, this narrow focus on administration has led to neglect of the families of the pacifists, the people who actually felt the affects of the policies formulated by politicians in Parliament and who witnessed the persecution and punishment of their loved ones. Attention has not been paid to the role of the family and I endeavour to remedy this neglect. I wish to explore how the family members in both wars were affected by the pacifist stance adopted by men in their families, and how they responded. (…) The stand of a conscientious objector is 'a protest against war and leads inevitably to conflict with the State.' 3 When a man elected to object to war and go against prevailing opinion at the time, he was putting himself forward to be ostracised, harassed and abused by the community, and be punished officially by the Government. This radical and life-changing decision to be a conscientious objector would likely have been a gradual process of thought and debate during the objector's life, not a spontaneous snap decision. I wish to explore the role that upbringing played in this decision-making process, and to investigate the influence that parents consciously or sub-consciously had over their children's views regarding peace and war. (…) By focusing on the family in research regarding conscientious objection in New Zealand over both Wars, this dissertation sheds light on hitherto neglected areas of investigation, and gives a voice to mothers, fathers, siblings and children who have until now often remained unheard. [extract from Introduction]

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