2,898 results for Unitec Research Bank

  • Sport development and physical activity promotion: An integrated model to enhance collaboration and understanding

    Rowe, Katie; Shilbury, David; Ferkins, Dr Lesley; Hinckson, Erica (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    As inactivity and obesity levels continue to rise, calls are being made for sport development action to be further directed towards capitalising on the value of community participation for health and social benefits. This paper seeks to highlight a current disconnect between physical activity and sport management research, and identify opportunities for collaboration. To date, the sport management literature has predominantly focused on sport as a form of entertainment with spectatorship outcomes, where professional codes are a commonly used setting of research inquiry. There has been less focus on organisational issues related to participation in sport and recreation. This is identified as a gap, given the current push towards increasing focus on sport and recreation promotion for community wellbeing. The present paper sought to examine physical activity and sport management research, to identify commonalities and potential for integration and co-operation. The outcome of this review is a conceptual framework, integrating socio-ecological models, taken from physical activity research, and sport development concepts derived from sport management theory. The proposed conceptual framework seeks to provide sport management researchers with direction in their efforts to promote participation in sport, recreation and physically active leisure domains, particularly for community wellbeing purposes. Furthermore, such direction may also enhance the capacity of researchers to capitalise on opportunities for collaboration and integration across domains of inquiry.

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  • Sport governance encounters: Insights from lived experiences

    Shilbury, David; Ferkins, Dr Lesley; Smythe, Liz (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This study explored sport governance practice from the lived experience of one informant spanning a 30-year period in the governance of two sport organisations (basketball and cricket). Hermeneutic phenomenology, the methodological framework used for this study, seeks to grasp the everyday world, and draw insight and meaning from it. The method involves a series of in-depth interviews with one research participant, supplemented by document analysis. Interviews were analysed using an interpretative process which blended the world views of both the participant and researchers. The participant lived through an era of increasing professionalisation within sport. His narrative, which tapped into his governance expertise at state, national and international levels, provides insights into the transition from an amateur to a commercial culture, referred to in this paper as ‘two worlds colliding’. From this narrative, three related themes were identified and labelled, ‘volunteer and cultural encounters’; ‘structural encounters’; and ‘adversarial encounters’. In drawing on hermeneutic philosophy, and highlighting that which has been hidden from view, direction for future research and practice within the sport governance domain is offered. These directions invite scholars to think about future sport governance research as it relates to federated structures and how collaborative governance theory can sharpen the focus in this domain.

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  • Systems dynamics modelling of pathways to a hydrogen economy in New Zealand : final report

    Leaver, Jonathan; Gillingham, Kenneth; Baglino, A. (2012-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This report represents a compilation of work prepared under Objective 6: Carbon to Hydrogen Energy – Proof of Concept of FRST contract C08X0204.

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  • Climate change and Generation Zero : analysing the 50/50 campaign : a communication for social change approach

    Noronha, Sandra (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Climate change does not respect national boundaries or distinguish between big and small polluters. It is one of the truly global problems humanity faces today. In spite of this, there is reluctance to believe in the existence of climate change even though the scientific consensus is that human influence bears much of the responsibility

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  • Akoaga : efficacy, agency, achievement and success in the tertiary sector : focus on students and parents from Pasifika communities

    Marat, Deepa; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Latu, Savae; Aumua, Linda; Talakai, Malia; Sun, Kang (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The term akoaga has a pan-Polynesian origin and meaning. In the Samoan language, the term can be broken into two root words, ako and aga. Ako or ato means basket and aga means measurements associated with weaving.

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  • A comparative approach to determining the growth of productivity of the New Zealand construction industry

    Abbott, Malcolm; Carson, Chris (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in the productivity and efficiency of the construction industry in New Zealand. In part this interest has manifested itself in the increased use of numerous statistical techniques to determine the productivity and efficiency of the industry. These efforts have, however, some degree of controversy. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, threefold. First it summarises the key structural findings that have been determined from past research into the construction industry in New Zealand. Secondly it makes some comparisons between the construction industry’s productivity in New Zealand with that of the six states of Australia. Finally it also considers potential areas for potential future research.

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  • Learning about and through teaching : Course work and practicum during initial teacher education

    Grudnoff, Lexie; Ward, Lorrae; Ritchie, Jenny; Brooker, Barry; Simpson, Mary (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper reports on findings from the final pilot of a survey (N=811) to be used by multiple New Zealand initial teacher education providers to measure graduating teacher perceptions of how well their programmes prepared them to start teaching. The survey, commissioned by the Teacher Education Forum of Aotearoa New Zealand (TEFANZ), is their proactive response to the political accountability demands that are a feature of teacher education internationally, and to the need for higher education to take a lead in the accountability ‘narrative’ (Shulman, 2007). This paper focuses on the perceptions of graduating student teachers regarding the learning opportunities provided to them during their ITE programmes. It compares opportunities during course work and practicum and suggests that more attention should be given to both components to ensure that student teacher learning is maximised in teacher preparation programmes.

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  • Visual arts education: Provoking learning conversations

    Wrightson, Helen; Plows, J. (2013-04-20)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Visual arts praxis dilemmas can invoke uncertainty, calling for courage to engage in learning conversations that promote innovative ideas. These may challenge teachers but by engaging in dialogue can invite reflection and possible changes to practice. This workshop explores visual arts education and differing ideas teachers hold about children’s drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture. Visual arts are a valuable mode for children to make meaning and express emotions so let’s talk and explore possibilities

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  • Culturally responsive practice as quality early childhood care and education provision.

    Ritchie, Jenny (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Over the last two decades New Zealand has become one of a small number of culturally and linguistically superdiverse countries. Superdiversity indicates a level of cultural complexity surpassing anything previously experienced. Aotearoa NZ is now home to 160 languages, forecasted to deepen even further. “Learning to interpret across cultures demands reflecting on our own experiences, analyzing our own culture, examining and comparing varying perspectives. We must consciously and voluntarily make our cultural lenses apparent. Engaging in the hard work of seeing the world as others see it must be a fundamental goal for any move to reform the education of teachers and their assessment”--Lisa Delpit Culturally responsive practice - Management and practitioners to demonstrate their awareness of historical, social, cultural and political contexts, and the impacts of past and current social, educational and economic policies in relation to contemporary inequities.

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  • Whaia te iti kahurangi: Relationships of Promise

    Ritchie, Jenny (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This talk will draw upon my recent writing, and on work from our Teaching and Learning Research Initiative project Titiro Whakamuri, Hoki Whakamua: We are the future, the present and the past: caring for self, others and the environment in early years’ teaching and learning. Pedagogies of care and affect, which resonate te ao Māori conceptualisations of inter-connectedness will be proposed as a source of optimism in response to the challenges that we face. One conceptual tool in response to these matters of concern is an ethic of care (Noddings 1995), applied in our recent study as the notion of ‘caring for ourselves, others and the environment’. A second conceptual tool is re-visibilisation and revalidation of Indigenous onto-epistemologies, which position humans as part of and reliant upon, rather than superior to and detached from our local and global world(s).

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  • Field Study for Evaluating Winter Thermal Performance of Auckland School Buildings

    Su, Bin (2015-02)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Auckland has a temperate climate with comfortable warm, dry summers and mild, wet winters. An Auckland school normally does not need air conditioning for cooling during the summer and only needs heating during the winter. The Auckland school building thermal design should more focus on winter thermal performance and indoor thermal comfort for energy efficiency. This field study of testing indoor and outdoor air temperatures, relative humidity and indoor surface temperatures of three classrooms with different envelopes were carried out in the Avondale College during the winter months in 2013. According to the field study data, this study is to compare and evaluate winter thermal performance and indoor thermal conditions of school buildings with different envelopes.

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  • Exploring the engagement of New Zealand diagnostic radiographers with research

    Haven, Jennifer (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Research question: To what extent are New Zealand diagnostic radiographers engaged with research and why?

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  • Keep it or kill it? How the behaviour of domestic cats (Felis catus) impacts upon perceptions of their value and management methods

    Farnworth, Mark (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The domestic cat is the most commonly owned companion animal both in New Zealand and globally. Recent dialogues around the impact and value of cats have once again brought them into the spotlight and this presentation seeks to discuss these New Zealand based dialogues using a behavioural framework. Generally cats are thought to live in three broad categories: ‘Feral’, ‘Stray’ and ‘Companion’ and how a cat is attributed to these categories will depend upon its behaviour in and around human habitation. Other behavioural qualities such as predatory behaviours, which are not considered human-centred, are shared across all cats and have the potential to substantially impact upon cat treatment and welfare. Behavioural temperaments are constructed over the lifetime of an animal and, consequently, how a cat behaves and how it is labelled will be directly related to the degree of care historically provided to it. Cats in New Zealand have no enforceable ownership requirements that function to reduce their likelihood of becoming lost or abandoned. As a result they are far more likely to be abandoned that dogs. In part this may be because they are seen as being behaviourally independent and as having a need to roam. As a result of historic loss or abandonment ‘feral’ cats become behaviourally and reproductively autonomous. They are, therefore, freely and necessarily controlled through lethal means. ‘Stray’ cats are also euthanized frequently in order to manage the population, especially if they are behaviourally unable to be adopted. This presentation seeks to draw together prior research and prospective research ideas to generate a discussion around public perceptions of what a ‘cat’ is, both as a construct of their behaviour and as constructs of the New Zealand society in which they reside. A better understanding of cat behaviour could lead to improved management, reduced abandonment and therefore a decline in our need to kill cats.

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  • To close your eyes will not ease another’s pain - Investigating behavioural indicators of pain in cats

    Waran, Nat; Farnworth, Mark (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Animals being non-verbal, express their experience of painful conditions and procedures through their behaviour. In humans, pain is what the patient says it is, and we know that the subjective experience varies from individual to individual, and doesn’t necessarily relate to the size or seriousness of the wound or illness. In animals, pain is what we say it is and it is recognized that traditionally pain management for cats has been described as seriously under-provisioned, with a number of studies demonstrating that cats appear to be under treated for pain as compared with how dogs are managed for similar procedures. Overall it is postulated that under-provision of analgesia arose because of the difficulties in detecting pain behaviour in cats, from perceptions about the unique physiology of the cat and an associated lack of approved analgesics such as NSAID for use in cats as well as a general caution amongst veterinary practitioners when using certain drug types (such as opioids). Because good pain management relies on good recognition of pain, it is essential that research to identify reliable indicators of a painful experience be carried out and the results properly disseminated and used in practice. There is an old Chinese proverb that says ‘to close your eyes will not ease another’s pain’, something that we must be conscious of when dealing with animals, such as cats who can only express their pain in less overt and subtle ways.

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  • A stroke of luck: The win-win of a clinical research partnership

    Roy, Dianne (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Stroke in New Zealand ; The stroke of luck (Research for Health Professionals) ; The Stroke Family Whanau Project ; The win-wins.

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  • Does activity theory help our understanding of teamwork, leadership and interprofessional collaboration?

    McKimm, J.; Barrow, M.; Gasquoine, Susan; Rowe, D. (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Background and purpose The literature identifies the lack of a conceptual underpinning to interprofessional education and collaborative practice, linking this to the failure of many initiatives to improve such practice. Many reported educational initiatives, typically in uni-professional contexts, relate to teaching non-technical skills (teamwork, leadership and communication) where the inability of professionals to work together is manifested in practice. We report on an ongoing research study in New Zealand which aims to enhance our understanding of the complexities of professional, collaborative practice by identifying the perceptions and experiences of doctors and numes at different stages of their professional career about teamworking, collaborative practice, working interprofessionally, leadership and followership. Methodology In stage one of the study, we interviewed and carried out a questionnaire survey of newly graduated doctors and nurses working in secondary care, exploring their perceptions and understandings of leadership and teamworking. In stage two, 40 face-to-face, individual, semi- structured interviews were carried out in 2011-12 with senior doctors and nurses working in two clinical settings in a large urban hospital. Data generated were analysed with a framework developed using activity theory enhance understanding of interprofessional teamworking. Results Health professionals work in multiple teams with competing needs and conflicting values. Loyalty to the professional team often overrides other considerations leading to dysfunction and sabotage. Patient advocacy is used to challenge other professionals and enable collaborative practice. Contemporary teaching of 'teamwork' or 'communication’ in uni-professional training may enhance understanding but is unlikely to improve interprofessional 'collaboration’ in practice', as it fails to address how health professionals actually work in contemporary health services. An activity theory based framework is used to consider how the context of care might affect clinicians' conceptualisation of collaboration with other professionals, members of their own profession (intra-professional working) and members of other professions (inter- professional working). The nature and interviewees' perceptions of 'collaboration' in different specialties is also explored. To achieve improved patient care, we discuss how different pre- qualifying education and ongoing professional development is needed to help health professionals achieve greater understanding of the complexity of interprofessional teamworking and the loci of power, control, and authority. Such development requires changing ways of thinking about identity formation, how different professionals perceive healthcare, the influence of the specialty and the location of professionals' healthcare work.

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  • Nurturing Collaboration:Conservation Outcomes for Kea

    Roberts, Lorne; Orr-Walker, Tamsin; Adams, Nigel; Kemp, Joshua R. (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Abstract: In 2009, the first in-situ kea population survey trials began under the coordination of the Kea Conservation Trust in partnership with Department of Conservation (DOC). Early census results from Nelson Lakes showed that kea density had declined significantly since a previous census a decade earlier. To ensure that mountain-top counts were coinciding with fledging times (the optimal life stage for survey work), a parallel project, Nest Monitoring, was developed. Motion sensor cameras and radio trackers were thus purchased and deployed during the next breeding season. The radio tags and cameras provided critical information on pest visitation to kea nests, confirmation of the breeding status of individual adults, fledging times, and nest survival. Three further years of nest data collection ensued on the back of this success. But how did this get off the ground? For a ‘fledgling’ conservation trust to finance and coordinate such a project, suitable collaborators had to be found and engaged. Private business backing was used as seed funding to secure larger Lotteries Grants. Additional corporate sponsorship supported successful grant applications to zoos, zoo organizations and other interested agencies. In-kind support by DOC and a huge number of volunteer man-hours have further contributed to this extremely successful collaborative project which is now in its fifth year. This paper looks at who came on board and why, and how this collaborative effort has resulted in positive conservation outcomes for one of New Zealand’s iconic species.

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  • Embedding indigenous knowledge in the crowded space of a tertiary institution

    Keelan, Josie (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In keeping with the tradition of my people I acknowledge the indigenous people of Australia, and their ancestors all of whom have maintained the spirit of the land through the generations and will continue to do so going forward. I acknowledge other indigenous people who have travelled to the conference from the four winds. And I acknowledge there will be those at the conference who would challenge the notion of who indigenous people are. So for my purposes in the presentation, I will be referring to those who had the first communion with the land; who made the first lores and laws; who spoke the first language of the land; who designed the first cultures; who built the first abodes; who first interacted with the native flora and fauna; whose blood was first spilt on the land; who created the first learning systems; whose struggle today is to be heard when the noise of ‘the other’ is so loud it leaves no room for anyone else. Embedding indigenous knowledge into curriculum that does not have its foundation in that knowledge is a challenge many indigenous groups around the world face when invited and being allowed into the tertiary space usually after some time fighting for that right. The challenge being faced extends to the delivery of student support services and the governance and management, processes and practices of the tertiary institution. The issue is one of demonstrating the relevance of indigenous knowledge in a multicultural context where the dominant culture believes their knowledge system delivers to all when evidence clearly shows this not to be the case. The intent in this presentation is to demonstrate that when an effort is made to improve the delivery of services to indigenous students, all students benefit. The presentation will focus on Māori students in Aotearoa New Zealand and the work being done at Unitec Institute of Technology (Unitec) to embed mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) in curriculum and the way in which the Institute does its business. Student support services are seen as an integral part of that conversation rather than separate from it. In 2010 Unitec adopted a Māori Success Strategy with implementation of that strategy beginning in 2011. The investment in that strategy is beginning to show results. The next challenge for the Institute will be in maintaining those outcomes once the official success, retention and completion statistics, which are the only measures government is interested in, have reached parity with non-Māori. The presence of international students is one of the many ways in which challenges to the inclusion of indigenous knowledge is presented. That is, indigenous knowledge is of no relevance to international students because they want a course of study that is the same as that which is available elsewhere in the world – a rather limiting idea of what education is about nevertheless an argument I have heard many a time from non-Māori. The reply to such a challenge is that international students can benefit hugely from the indigenous theories, models and frameworks. Additionally, the inclusion of indigenous knowledge can challenge their perceptions of the world and often strengthens their own identity. It can of course also challenge their own and their country’s ideological stand on the place of indigenous people and that can be scary. There are ways in which Māori knowledge is being made available to international students other than in the classroom and at least one case study on how a university in Auckland is doing this will be presented. The presentation therefore is about ways of moving forward whilst acknowledging the barriers that exist. Tihe mauriora (I sneeze and therefore I am)!

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  • Shades of Grey 2.0: Ethics Education Gaming

    Oldfield, James; McKnight, Carol; Goundar, Nadesa; Stewart, James; Slessor, Andrew (2014-09-04)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The Shades of Grey education game is a team-based game that students play in a class lecturers to easily add gaming elements to their lessons. Shades of Grey is used as a mechanism to encourage the student discussion and debate of the ethical issues raised in a series of ethically challenging situations. It is expected that this will increase student engagement with the subject matter and participation in discussion. Since the initial development and testing of the Shades of Grey game (SoG) prototype in 2010 there has been significant change in the availability and capability of mobile devices in the classroom. More students are equipped with smart mobile devices, wireless networking technology is improving and technologies such as HTML5 are helping to improve cross platform internet experiences. With these changes in mind, the Shades of Grey research team have sought an internal research grant to fund the re-development of the game to make use of the mobile devices that students bring with them and to make it easier for teaching staff to customise the game for their own needs. An enhanced second version of the game has been developed and to date has been trialled in an advanced auditing course in semester two 2014. Students who played the game were given the opportunity to participate in the study of SoG by completing a questionnaire. Findings from the questionnaire were used to uncover the perceptions of students towards the game which were overwhelmingly positive. These perceptions will be used in conjunction with the facilitator's observations to inform future development and the potential for its continued use in the programme and beyond. This presentation reports on those findings and the future of the Shades of Grey education game.

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  • Fighting Back: Education Initiatives in the Teaching of Architecture.

    Murphy, Chris; Smith, Brendan (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This research presentation will examine the effectiveness of two educational initiatives carried out in Semester 1 2013 within the Unitec Department of Architecture. 1. Embedding the librarian in the Design Communication teaching course: The Department of Architecture, like most other tertiary courses, faces challenges in the transitioning of students from the secondary to the tertiary learning environment. Many students skilled in the design focused courses do not always exhibit strengths in written communication to the standard required for degree level. This lack of confidence becomes particularly apparent when students are required to deal with . research issues that require active engagement with the library In 2013, with the support of the Faculty Librarian, it was decided to embed a resident librarian within the team unit teaching Design Communication. The course taught written and oral communication skills to all first year students. The librarian was present each week and was an active support person within the course. The feedback from the course was very positive. What was particularly satisfying, however, was the noted uptake by library staff of first year students in their use of the library space and facilities, compared to first year student use in previous years. 2. Digital Devices as a communication and feedback tool: A significant increase in student numbers in 2012 led to communication issues within the course Design Studio 1. In 2013 it was decided to re-configure the streams, place more emphasis on group led teaching, and to deliver regular feedback to students via social media using digital devices. The initiative was a shared one with Unitec's Te Puna Ako, who supplied and supported staff in their use of the electronic devices. This research presentation will discuss the effectiveness of these two initiatives

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