11 results for Bachelors with Honours

  • Applications of near-surface geophysics in the search for graves in Maori urupa

    Bateman, Leah (2003)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Maori urupa (burial grounds) are culturally significant sites that demand appropriate sensitivity and respect. Due to the loss of oral records some locations of the older graves are no longer known. Therefore, non-invasive, non-destructive, near-surface geophysical techniques have been applied at two urupa on Banks Peninsula in an attempt to delineate the position of the unmarked graves. Prior knowledge that Maori graves are traditionally aligned facing east aided in survey design. The sites were surveyed using shallow electromagnetic (EM), magnetometer/gradiometer and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) techniques. There was some data processing carried out. Geological factors and cultural noise (such as fences, trees and reinforced concrete) degraded the quality of some of the individual data sets. However, conducting a multi-parameter geophysical survey enabled the objectives to be achieved. It is believed that this method was successful in delineating the likely positions of the unmarked graves at Koukourarata and Wairewa. However, due to the sensitive nature of the site excavations to confirm geophysical findings are not appropriate. There were clusters of graves identified in one area at Koukourarata. A further area of interest was highlighted as a possible locality for graves at this site. At Wairewa, anomalies were present in clear rows, indicating the probable positions of unmarked graves.

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  • More than ‘just a bump in the road?’: a source analysis of the effects of the Muldergate scandal on South Africa’s international image in the 1970s and 1980s.

    Bailey, Ben (2017)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This dissertation investigates how the Muldergate scandal affected South Africa’s international image. In his book Selling Apartheid, Ron Nixon claimed that the Muldergate scandal had a negligible effect, stating that it was “just a bump in the road.” Nixon then concluded his chapter on Muldergate without further explanation or justification. I have investigated how the Muldergate Scandal was portrayed by foreign media, and sought to gauge the foreign public response to it. I did this by examining articles from three London newspapers between the 1960s and 1980s . I will show that the events of the Muldergate Scandal were made public through these newspapers, and despite the copious information available, the scandal did not have a significant impact on the Apartheid Government. This confirms Nixon’s “bump in the road” claim.

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  • Mobilization through faith: the religious reaction to the First World War in the United Kingdom through the national and local press.

    Hanford, Georgia (2017)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis examines the reactions to the First World War by the churches of the United Kingdom through the use of published newspapers. In the past there has been a lack of focus on the role religion played throughout the war, but its importance to daily life during this period makes it a significant aspect to understanding British wartime spirit. The terms used by the clergy that were documented in the press reveal how religion sought to justify the conflict and make the Church relevant in a period where institutionalized religion was in decline. Scholars have had an increasing interest in the theological framing of the First World War, and it has been portrayed as a religious battle by historians Philip Jenkins and Albert Marrin. Especially in the period surrounding August 4, the anniversary of Britain’s entrance into the war, clergy made their opinions heard, whether through direct publication or the documentation of sermons given at war intercession services around the United Kingdom. Despite denominational differences, these men espoused similar themes that sought to capitalize on the religious understanding most people had and insert the Church back into a position of public dominance.

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  • The Canterbury Female Refuge: a case study 1865 - 1916

    Rogers, Emilie (2017)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This dissertation examines the Canterbury Female Refuge from its founding in 1865 through until 1916. New Zealand welfare historians have looked at this period of Charitable Aid based relief in some detail, along with studies of some of our early charitable institutions. However, the Canterbury Female Refuge has remained a footnote in these other histories, and has not be explored in any considerable depth. I examine the history of the Female Refuge, looking at the founding and running of the institution by the Charitable Aid Board and the Anglican Church. This dissertation also seeks to paint a historically accurate picture of how single mothers were treated. I looked at the everyday experiences of these women while at the Female Refuge, as well as their lives following their stay. The women who entered the Refuge were largely from the working classes, and most went into domestic service following their stay. The records used in this study suggest that these women did not experience the level isolation or social shame that may be expected. The Female Reformatory, which served as a refuge for troubled women, is also discussed here as a comparative study between two similar institutions. This dissertation aims to add to the existing scholarship on welfare, women and early society in New Zealand.

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  • When fiction gets real: representations of American cultural issues during the Vietnam era

    Senior, Hayley (2017)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This dissertation investigates the underlying issues in American culture at the time of the Vietnam War, through the study of three cultural texts. Historically, scholarship on the Vietnam War tends to focus on the issue of the war itself, and its impact on American soldiers and society. This dissertation demonstrates that despite the prominence of the Vietnam War in society, and cultural memory, other key issues did impact on American culture. Three main texts examined for their representation of American culture are: the television show M*A*S*H*, the novels In Country and The Things They Carried. Each chapter discusses the way the texts both represented and evaluated the key cultural concerns of American society at the time of the Vietnam War. They also identify the ways in which the texts facilitate societal engagement in culture, and how they enabled processes of healing. These texts reveal that the United States was undergoing a period of great change and turmoil, as a result of not only the Vietnam War, but other prominent cultural issues. This dissertation uses these texts to confirm the relevance of cultural texts as representations of culture, and also their significance as methods of dealing with trauma.

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  • Welcomed with open arms? The experience of refugees who emigrated from Nazi Europe to New Zealand in the years 1935-1945

    Aitken, Jeremy (2017)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    If one considers the event of recent years, as in Syria or with the Rohingya peoples, the world is struggling to deal with refugee crises. In this age of uncertainty, perhaps looking at the examples of our ancestors may offer some guidance. In doing so we can glean knowledge of the difficulties and implications that come out of resolving such a crisis and hopefully avoid past mistakes. For New Zealand, the exodus from Nazi Europe that occurred in the years 1938 and 1939 provides a valuable perspective. It is an event which tends to get overshadowed by the rise of Hitler and World War Two but offers important insights into the response of the world to a humanitarian crisis. This dissertation examines New Zealand’s role in the crisis itself and the role of humanitarian organisations within the country in looking after refugees and sheltering them from Nazi oppression. This is done through an examination of the interactions between refugees, humanitarian organisations such as the REC, the government and ordinary New Zealanders. Groups like the REC proved invaluable to the refugee effort as they aided refugees in almost every aspect of their asylum and served as important advocates for their entry. Their propaganda campaigns were pivotal in guiding public opinion to receptiveness but as war broke out New Zealanders became highly suspicious and fearful of refugees. Wartime regulations and the classification of refugees as ‘Enemy Aliens’ disrupted a highly effective relief effort but did not dent its enthusiasm. The REC displaying great aptitude and ability in defending refugee rights and playing a pivotal role in caring for a group that would go on and become an integrated part of New Zealand society.

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  • A picture and a hundred thousand words: the Vietnam War’s influence on the rise of long-form journalism

    Brill, Jonathan Dominique Waite (2017)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Journalists played an important role in the Vietnam War through their critique and analysis of how the war progressed. Their writing in newspapers and magazines influenced public and government opinion about the war. Journalists did not just write newspaper or magazine articles, or record interviews for television, they wrote books about their experiences, interviews and research. These books, long-form journalism, explored many aspects of the Vietnam War, analytically and critically. The Vietnam War influenced the rise of this type of journalism through the detail and context that journalists were able to provide about a war that lasted nineteen years and would see America unable to prevent the fall of South Vietnam to communism. The historiography of the media and the Vietnam War overwhelmingly focuses on information and analysis that appeared in newspapers, magazines and on television. There is a distinct lack of analysis on long-form works as a medium in the Vietnam War. This research shows that the Vietnam War created a situation whereby traditional mediums were insufficient to fully explain the Vietnam War. The war necessitated journalistic investigation and criticism. This led to the writing of many popular and successful long-form works that presented, examined and criticised the Vietnam War. Journalists examined in long-form the secrecy inherent in the war such as the control of information and perception of how the war progressed. They also examined in detail the failure of policy and military strategy in South Vietnam which led to the withdrawal of America and to victory for North Vietnam.

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  • Reproductive rights and wrongs: abortion as a crime in nineteenth-century England

    Boot, Lauren (2017)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis explores the practice of abortion in nineteenth-century England, and specifically focuses on how abortion’s illegality impacted its application and those who sought this medical procedure. This thesis investigates a number of methods of abortion such as chemical abortifacients, surgical instruments and other homeopathic remedies which abortion providers and pregnant women used in their attempts to procure abortion. It also considers the demographics of those who sought abortion and questions whether working class women were more likely to seek abortion than their middle or upper class peers. This thesis then critically examines the outcomes of the numerous trials of illegal abortion in London in the nineteenth century through analysis of documents from the Old Bailey archive. A number of primary sources have been instrumental to this thesis, including 19th century medical journal articles, court records and newspaper articles. This work aims to demonstrate that abortion in 19th century England, while illegal and denounced by many as a social evil and a clear moral failing, was practiced widely. The illegal status of abortion did influence the methods of its application, but by no means stopped it from occurring. The illegality and stigma surrounding this medical procedure in fact pushed women towards more radical and life-threatening measures in their efforts to retain control over their own bodies while also trying to avoid the legal consequences imposed by nineteenth century anti-abortion legislation.

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  • Bound to the Book: the role of religion in the Barbary slave trade

    Borsje-Clark, Lewis (2017)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This research essay concerns the Barbary slave trade of the Sixteenth to mid-Nineteenth century and examines to what extent religion governed its operation. This research shall be conducted by analysing the various primary accounts of slave-captives, explorers, and politicians. This analysis shall then demonstrate the various roles that religion played during the Barbary slave trade. These roles mostly regarded the harsh treatment of non-Muslims by Muslims. This was because appeals were made to the Qur’an, hadiths, and Islamic law to justify the enslavement, vilification, ostracisation, and abuse of non-Muslims. Even in instances where the Qur’an and Islamic law were ignored in regards to the treatment of non-Muslims, Islam as an ideology was still called upon in order to justify traditionally un-Islamic acts. This was because Islam was a quintessential part of the Barbary region’s culture, meaning the majority of these Muslims rigorously adhered to traditional Islamic teachings, while others adhered to Islam through personal interpretations rather than strictly by official doctrine. Some notable Christian responses to the Barbary slave trade shall also be analysed. These responses included Christian-inspired appeals to assist enslaved Christians, Christian-based responses to rescued Christians, ex-Christians, and Muslims, and even willing conversions of some Christians to Islam. Much scholarship exists on the role of slavery in Islamic societies. However, the Barbary Coast’s history of slavery deserves attention because it has generally only received brief mention when Islamic slavery is discussed, and until now there has been no comprehensive analysis of the role religion played in its midst.

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  • Representations of rulership in the Legenda aurea.

    Cole, Zhivannah Leigh Mae (2017)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The thirteenth century is a period of great innovations in the development of political thought. The relationship between temporal and ecclesiastical power became increasingly strained over this period, giving birth to a plethora of new political narratives from the intellectual elite. Many of these new narratives wove Aristotelian philosophy into their theories of power, and indeed their world views. Through analysing the way in which Jacobus de Voragine represents temporal rulership throughout the Legenda aurea (The Golden Legend), this research provides insight into the political ideas circulating within popular thought from the thirteenth century. Jacobus’ representation of rulership in the Legenda aurea, communicates a well-articulated model of traditional Augustinian thought, which would have been an influential source of traditional political thought for the wider population, which ran counter to the papal hierocratic model of power. The way in which Jacobus crafted the bond between temporal and divine spheres is integral to understanding the power and appeal of Jacobus’ work within contemporary society. Jacobus’ political views were an integral part of the way in which Jacobus conceived of the world in which he lived. Jacobus’ representation temporal of rulership throughout the Legenda aurea is a communication of more than a political theory, but an explanation of the divine mechanics which underscored temporal existence.

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  • FEASIBILITY OF TRANSPORTING MAINLAND AGGREGATE TO AUCKLAND

    Brockett, David (2005)

    Bachelors with Honours thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Auckland aggregate industry is approaching a crisis situation: conflicting land use and amenity values in both urban and rural areas are relegating quarries to increasingly remote sites. This has lead to higher transport costs, increased wear and congestion on the roading network and the ability of the suppliers to control the market through decreased competition. A seemingly inexhaustible source of quality aggregate can be won from the West Coast of the South Island, where geomorphic action produces material and high rainfall and gravity transport it to the coast often threatening important infrastructure. This dissertation examines the plausible method and conditions to transport aggregate from the overstocked supply of Westland to the resource handicapped greater Auckland area. Investigation involved literature review; meeting market authorities, contacting both local and central government authorities; and discussion with academics. It was found that the governance of the New Zealand Transport sector is currently in flux meaning only speculative projections can be drawn. The West Coast river gravel resource is predominantly high grade aggregate greywacke and granite origin, with the proportion of low-grade aggregate schist increasing the further south the location. Sustainable extraction quantities from West Coast would need to be established prior to removal of large quantities of gravel. Access to the Port of Onehunga is restricted to 4 days a week and no barges are currently available due to the international demand for coal. It is inevitable that the Auckland Aggregate resource will become exhausted. It was deduced that this will to occur between 2015 and 2021. The shipping of sealing chip to Auckland is currently feasible if a back load is negotiated. Shipping other aggregate types will become feasible as the native resource diminishes and the cost of compliance in Auckland increases further.

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