38 results for Honours Dissertation

  • Attitudes in New Zealand to Scandinavian immigration, 1870-1876

    Grigg, A R (1973)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: vi, 125 leaves ; 30 cm. Notes: Bibliography: l. 120-125.

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  • Pushing past the confines of femininity : music for women in Dunedin, 1907-1950 : a vehicle for agency, recognition and social connections

    Deuchrass, Andrea (2001)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Music is a form of self-expression, community or national culture, political voice and ethnic identity, among many other things. This dissertation examines the way that music can be a central influence to life for women, in a social structure encompassing the factors of gender and femininity, socio-economics and to a lesser extent, ethnicity. Music can provide a livelihood, form of (small) income and a way of making social connections in a sphere that can function both in and out of the home. It is also an activity where people often cross social boundaries. I have chosen to examine the extent to which music gave women agency, social acceptance and enjoyment in the Otago district from 1907 to 1950.

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  • Geophysical survey of the Paringa River valley, South Westland

    Kilner, Jeremy William (2005)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: [iv], 104 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.) and 1 map (folded). Notes: CD-ROM and map in pockets inside back cover. University of Otago department: Geology. Thesis (B. Sc. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2005. Includes bibliographic references.

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  • "Square girls" : Prostitutes and prostitution in Dunedin in the 1880s

    Lucas, E Heather (1985)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The study of prostitutes and prostitution in New Zealand has usually been subordinate to a more general analysis of women and crime. As prostitutes were, and still are, regarded as criminals in New Zealand, this has been a valid approach. However, prostitution was a particular sort of crime, in that it was essentially a crime against middle class morality. As a consequence, a study of prostitution, in itself, not only allows a fuller appreciation of the nature and extent ,of prostitution in New Zealand, but also an insight into the social structure and attitudes pertaining to sexuality and morality in colonial New Zealand. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Ripples from Europe: the Dunedin Jewish community in the 1930s and 1940s

    Baumberg, Christine (1998-11)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of BA (Hons) in History and German at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. vi, 85 leaves, [6] leaves of plates (1 folded) : ill., map, ports. ; 30 cm.

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  • New Zealand’s legal profession – at a cross-roads?

    Leslie, Nicola K (2005)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    What do you call 100 lawyers at the bottom of the ocean? 'A good start!' New Zealand's legal profession is an easy scapegoat for public criticism. Yet barristers and solicitors are a tightly regulated profession. This paper aims to understand and analyse the current climate within the legal services market in New Zealand. Why is our legal profession under such attack? It seems ironic that a profession which aspires to high ideals could be the subject of such criticism. Yet we rarely consider why such high standards are demanded of a profession. Chapter One will discuss the concept of a profession, and show whether the legal profession in New Zealand can retain such a position. If there is to be any answer to disparaging remarks about lawyers, we must identify and resolve the criticisms of lawyers in New Zealand. Chapter Two will discuss the criticisms directed at barristers and solicitors, to understand why public confidence in our legal profession may be threatened. Ironically the legal profession is subject to a number of different controls. Parliament, the Courts, the profession's own representative bodies at both a national and local level and individual clients all impact on lawyers' practise. Chapter Three will discuss how each institution has responded to the criticisms made of lawyers. Chapter Four will assess any resulting concerns of the profession which remain problematic. This paper will review the legal profession in New Zealand. For all those who practise as barristers and solicitors this is your collective reputation at risk. It is a review with which all lawyers should be particularly concerned. [Introduction]

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  • Geology of the southern portion of the Greenhills ultramafic complex

    O’Loughlin, Benjamin (1998)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Exposed along a three kilometre stretch of coastline on the southern extremities of the South Island, New Zealand are a suite of calc-alkaline to tholeiitic ultramafic and gabbroic rocks which form the southern portion of the Greenhills Ultramafic Complex (GUC). This complex consists of a layered series of dunite, wehrlite, olivine-clinopyroxenite and gabbro of Earliest Triassic age (247Ma), which intrude Lower Permian meta-sedimentary lithologies of the Greenhills Group. Accompanying the intrusion of the complex is a narrow contact metamorphic aureole which decreases rapidly in grade from pyroxene-hornfels facies metamorphism, directly adjacent to the body, to regional prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism, with distance from the contact. The layered series of the GUC is stratigraphically divisible into an upper gabbroic portion of both non-cumulate and cumulate gabbroic rocks, and a lower ultramafic portion of dunite, wehrlite and olivine-clinopyroxenite. The lower ultramafic portion shows well-developed accumulate structures and textures that are typical of stratiform cumulate intrusions. Widespread slumping in the layered series in addition to discrete zones of intense brecciation, faulting, and multiple phases of dyke injection indicate recurring conditions of instability during the evolution of the complex. Textural, mineralogical, and chemical evidence suggests that two gabbro suites comprise the upper gabbroic portion. Namely, a cumulate suite (Shipwreck Gabbro) that is closely related to the lower ultramafic portion, and a non-cumulate (Barracouta Point Gabbro) suite, which is thought to have crystallised from a mixed magma. Whole rock chemistry of the layered series indicates a clear magmatic fractionation trend through dunite to gabbro, consistent with chemical fractionation from a basaltic parental magma. This trend is characterised by a systematic decrease in magnesium content with a concordant increase in silica, aluminium, calcium, and alkalis. A similar fractionation trend is exhibited by the evolution of the primary mineral phases olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase through the layered series. The theory that the GUC may have been derived by dry partial melting of the mantle wedge is supported by the similarity in trace element chemistry between the GUC and N-type Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB). Similarly, the trace element chemistry correlates well with recent basalts and basaltic andesites from the Tonga-Kermadec Island Arc, indicating that present day active ocean-ocean island arc subduction zones may serve as closely representative models for the evolution of remnant arcs such as that inferred for the GUC. The development of a strong tholeiitic to calc-alkaline island arc chemistry in the GUC is typical for magmatic bodies throughout the Brook Street Terrane, which are thought to represent the remnant of an ancient island arc system. A comparison of chemistry between the GUC and that of the Blashke Islands Alaskan-type intrusion from SE Alaska, indicates that these two bodies have been de1ived by fractional crystallisation of a closely similar parental magma, and thus, the GUC can be classified as a Alaskan-type Intrusion. The Greenhills Ultramafic Complex was produced as the result of crystal settling during fractional crystallisation of a basaltic parental magma produced by dry melting of the mantle wedge in an ocean-ocean island arc subduction zone. Modification of the layered body by magmatic slumping, mingling and brecciation and faulting depict recurring conditions of instability within the pluton which is considered typical of island arc subduction zones.

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  • Silent Sentinels : The War Trophies of the First New Zealand Expeditionary Force in War and Peace

    Fox, Aaron Patrick (1987)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The author has made available an updated and illustrated version of this dissertation at: http://www.kiamatetoa.com/drathesis.php

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  • Fatality in Cocteau's La machine infernale

    Davies, Ellen (1998)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Physical description: 45 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. "This Research Essay, prepared under the supervision of Dr Roy M. Dineen, is submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Otago for the degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honours in French." Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 1999. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Good faith bargaining in New Zealand: A study of its development and likely practical application

    Horne, Stuart (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: 89pp. Notes: University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Packing down the scrum: an historical analysis of the 1981 Springbok tour and the homosexuality issue in the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand

    Brown, Michael Neal Rowatt (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Physical description: iii, 68 leaves ; 30 cm. Covers the years 1981 through to 1995. Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 1995. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 66-68).

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  • Reform of the United Nations’ Security Council

    Kuzma, Annabel Jane (1998)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The intention of this thesis is to examine why the Security Council needs reforming, discuss the basic reform issues and present and assess the major proposals for reform. I propose to determine which of the current reform proposals, if any, are the most sensible in terms of achievability, desirability and acceptability.

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  • Big Norm - a principled pragmatist? : the origins and implementation of Norman Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies, 1959-1974

    Waite, James David Anthony (1999)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Preface: This essay aims to explore Norman Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies. It focuses on policy formulation and diplomatic process within the context of the 'moral and independent' foreign policy. The author does not aim to describe in detail the 1973 ICOJ case, that sought to end French atmospheric nuclear testing. Others have dealt with this event in detail and with great expertise. Instead the essay re-examines all of Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies, beginning in 1959 and ending with Kirk's death in August 1974. Kirk's policies continued in various forms after his death. Yet the strong and focused leadership that he provided in the field of disarmament and for humanitarian issues in general ended on 31 August 1974. The death of Kirk was a watershed for the New Zealand Labour Party. The man who dominated its leadership through two electoral defeats and one victory vanished from the political scene. Kirk's life as a mature politician constitutes an era in the history of New Zealand's anti-nuclear movement. His leadership deserves to be evaluated on its own terms.

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  • A functional analysis of coral tools from late prehistoric Moloka'i Island, Hawaii.

    Dickson, Hamish (1999)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    1.1 Research Orientation During the course of archaeological fieldwork conducted late in 1978, 425 artifacts relating to fishhook manufacture were recovered from site 38 on Moloka'i Island in the Hawaiian chain. Fishhook manufacturing artifacts include Porities sp coral and echinoid urchin spine abraders, basalt flakes, bone fishhook blanks and bone fishhook debitage. Artifacts deemed coral abraders (precise definition will be given in a latter section) were studied from this site and will be the focus of this dissertation. It is generally believed that coral abraders were used to manufacture fishhooks for the following reasons: 1) Coral artifacts have been found in close association with fishhook manufacture (Emory, Bonk and Sinoto and Sinoto, 1959, Allen, 1992; Suggs 1961; Kirch and Yen 1982 and Buck 1957: and many others). 2) Early ethnographic accounts recorded in the journals of Captain James Cook by Joseph banks (Endeavor botanist), describe native Pacific islanders manufacturing fishhooks using coral files (Hawkesworth, 1773). 3) Use-wear analysis by Allen (1992) indicates that a large number of these tools may have been used to manufacture fishhooks. This dissertation as two main aims: 1) To form a classification system (non-classificatory arrangement; after Dunnel, 1971) for the purpose of ascertaining a functional to coral tools in relation to fishhook manufacture. 2) To devise a standardised system for the measurement of attributes on coral abraders that may aid future functional studies . Chapter one will set the scene, giving details regarding the background of the site under investigation. A definition and basic description of coral tools will be provided along with a review of the literature regarding coral artifacts. Chapter two is divided into two parts. The first part involves a brief review of the literature on classification systems and typology’s. Also in the first section, a justification will be given as to why the particular classification system was used. The second half of chapter two will involve a justification of attributes chosen to form the classification system. The third chapter involves a description of the methods used in measuring attributes and why these attributes were measured in this manor. This will be followed with a detailed description of each artifact class. Each class description will be accompanied with possible functions. The last chapter will be brief, involving conclusions and suggestions for future research. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Deep Heat: An Experimental Analysis of Ovenstones

    Gillies, Karl B (1979)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Acknowledgements INTRODUCTION PART 1: METHODS AND MATERIALS. 1.1: Choice of Site, Construction and Ignition of Ovens; 1.2: Selection of Ovenstones; 1.3: Oven Monitoring; 1.4: Stone Assessment. PART 2: RESULTS. 2.1: Oven Temperature Graphs; 2.2: Heat Retention Differences Per Size and Type; 2.3: Shattered Stone Percentage Graphs; 2.4: Lithology of Fired Stones; 2.5: Typical Fracture Patterns. PART 3: DISCUSSION. 3.1: Experimental Sources of Error; 3.2: The Ovens and Their Food; 3.3: The Ovenstones. PART 4: CONCLUSIONS. PART 5: APPENDIX. Thermal Conductivity Graphs from Sutton’s BA Hons. Dissertation 1971. PART 6: SOURCES CONSULTED.

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  • The Weller's whaling station : the social and economic formation of an Otakou community, 1817-1850

    King, Alexandra (2010)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    This dissertation examines the structures and processes that underpin cultural formation at Otakou from 1817 to 1850. More specifically, I use the Wellers' whaling station, which was established in 1831, as a lens to explore the importance of family, kinship, and marriage to economic and social bonds forged between Kai Tahu and newcomers at Otakou. The word 'newcomers' is used rather than 'European' to show that these men were from many different backgrounds and ethnicities, and they cannot simply be classed as European sealers, whalers, or settlers. I focus on the Wellers' station because it had the longest life of a southern shore whaling station, dating from approximately 1831 to 1841. The whaling station was also an important contact zone between Maori and the newcomers, where people came together in economic partnership and also formed social bonds and affective ties. Whaling stations, like Otakou, are an important part of New Zealand's history as they formed some of the earliest interracial households in the country and heralded the beginning of permanent colonisation in many areas, particularly southern New Zealand.

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  • BECOME SOME BODY: A history of Aerobics, Instruction, and Body Culture at Les Mills World of Fitness from 1980-1992.

    Andrews, Catherine (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 92 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.

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  • Maori prisoners in Dunedin, 1869-1872 and 1879-1881 : exiled for a cause

    Reeves, Jane (1989)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The exile of Maori prisoners to Dunedin in 1869 and again in 1879, was due to the Northern wars and the confiscation of land in Taranaki by the Government. Maori never accepted the 'justice' imposed on them and active resistance to the confiscations continued throughout the 1860's, 1870's and 1880's. The first group of prisoners to reach Dunedin were Pakakohe men who had been allied with Titokowaru and his armed resistance to the confiscations. The second group were from Parihaka, they also resisted the land alienation, but passively. This dissertation addresses the reasons for the Government's imprisonment of Taranaki Maori, and it examines the legislation passed in 1879-80. It also concentrates on the general experiences of the prisoners in Dunedin. These include the work they were involved in, living conditions and health, and finally the relationships that were formed between the prisoners and Otakou Maori. I have not explored the political and religious philosophies of Titokowaru or Te Whiti, nor have I delved into the experiences of Maori prisoners exiled in Wellington, Lyttleton, Hokitika or Ripapa Island. Therefore, this dissertation is an introduction to a larger subject, and one that deserves extensive research. Part of the research included oral history. However in exploring the use of such a resource I also discovered the special demands that it places onto the researcher, and the restrictions that a time limit imposes. To do justice to oral sources, several years’ research would be required. The scarcity of information on some aspects of the study also imposed limitations and has had some effect on the structure of the essay. Much of the available information is non-specific and does not differentiate Maori prisoners from Pakeha prisoners. The study has therefore included an element of conjecture.

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  • Geology of the Gladstone peak area, Takitimu mountains, western Southland, New Zealand

    Scott, Graeme L. (1974)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Volcanogenic sediments of the Lower Permian Takitimu Group into the Gladstone Peak area are mapped and sub-divided into seven lithofacies. Some of the lithofacies indicate a shallow marine near shore environment, others indicate subaqueous and possibly subaerial pyroclastic flows. These volcanic sediments are cut by dykes, sills and plugs of predominantly basaltic composition and by a small diorite intrusion. The origin of the diorite intrusion is attributed to fractional crystallisation and flow differentiation. Six rocks have been chemically analysed and their geochemistry is examined. Some of the component oxides (SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, Na2O) in the volcanic rocks have been remobilized, redistributed and deposited elsewhere as authigenic minerals. The Takitimu Group rocks and intrusives have been metamorphosed to Zeolite facies and probably Prehnite-Pumpellyite facies in a low pressure type II terrain. There is a contact metamorphic aureole around the diorite intrusion. Some of the zeolites present would appear to require alkaline, mildly saline ground waters, relatively low activity of H2O, low chemical potential of CO2 and a relatively high temperature (ca. 250°C) for their formation. The metamorphism is similar to that which prevails in the Tanzawa Mountains, Japan where the geothermal gradient is inferred to have been between 40-60°C/km. The area is part of the Princhester Fault Block (new name) which is itself block faulted. It is likely that the dykes have intruded these Permian block faults. The strata in the Gladstone Peak area were later tilted. They characteristically dip gently toward the South-East and are interrupted by minor faults and cross-cutting veins.

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  • Otago 17 - Southland 11 : a social history of Otago rugby in the 1940s

    Lynch, Anthony (1984)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Sport plays a special role in New Zealand society, and one sport, rugby, dominates all others in terms or time, interest and participation. The 'national game' has helped to shape New Zealanders' perceptions or themselves, and the feats or the All Blacks have assisted the formulation of national identity. New Zealanders take pride in their prowess in this physically demanding game, and every Saturday in winter thousands turn out to participate in the game, as players or spectators. This interest is reflected in the great number or accounts or teams, games and trophies, and yet surprisingly little has been written about the role rugby has played in society. This long essay looks at what rugby meant for the people or Otago in the 1940s. In the history or rugby in the province, the 1940s were probably the most interesting and certainly the most important decade. It could be divided into two distinct periods; the war years and the Shield era. Between 1939 and 1945, New Zealand was involved in a major war, and this had an impact on sport as it did every other facet or New Zealand life. The first chapter will look at the impact or the war on the rugby in the province, and at the response or the ORFU, the clubs and the players to the difficulties or wartime rugby. The other important, and distinct, period in the 1940s was the 'Shield Era', when for three glorious years the province held the symbol or national rugby supremacy, the Ranfurly Shield. Otago was at its most formidable in 1948, its centennial year, and the final chapter looks at this period and its significance for the province. During the war years, rugby at the club level was most important, for there were few representative games played. But in the Shield era, Carisbrook hosted a feast of representative football, and all attention focused on the Otago team and its achievements. These two periods were very different because of this, and yet there was much that remained the same. These elements have been incorporated in the middle chapters. The first two look at those who were most actively involved in the game, the players, and the coaches and administrators. The latter two chapters regard the rituals that surrounded the game and were followed by the players and spectators. In writing a social history of rugby in the 1940s one great advantage has been the ability to use oral sources. Oral evidence adds life and vigour to the history of a lively and vigorous game, and where possible I have tried to reproduce this evidence, rather than that of newspapers or minutes, in the text. In conducting the interview I followed the procedure set out in Paul Thompson's The Voice of the Past, and then each interview was transcribed in full. Where possible, evidence was checked against documented sources (mostly newspapers). The 'Saturday' chapter in particular has drawn largely on oral sources, and so perhaps this best of all gives an insight into what the game meant for these men, and the many thousands like them. In all, I have tried not to lose sight of the game itself. As D. Smith and G. Williams in their fine work Fields of Praise noted, the game has too often emerged only as an illustration of something else that was going on in the real world; the intrinsic value of the game's history and the interlocking aspects with 'the real world' have not been appreciated.

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