489 results for Masters, 2007

  • Samurai Lear? : the cross-cultural intertexuality of Akira Kurosawa's Ran

    Gorringe, Karl (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    186 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: English. "Date: August 20, 2007."

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  • John Grierson, the NZNFU and the art of propaganda

    Hoskins, David John (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 187 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "6 February 2007." University of Otago department: Media, Film and Communication.

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  • From Wonder Woman to Aeon Flux : women heroes, feminism and femininity in post-war New Zealand

    Cullen, Lynda (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: v, 140 leaves ; 30 cm. Notes: "March 2007". University of Otago department: Anthropology. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • "Don't just visit. Live it!" : a descriptive study of Japan exchange and teaching programme participants' experiences in Miyazaki prefecture

    Doering, Timothy Adam (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: v, 166 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. Notes: "June 28, 2007" -- t.p. University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (M. Tour.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The spatial ecology of yellow-eyed penguin nest site selection at breeding areas with different habitat types on the South Island of New Zealand

    Clark, Ryan D (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: ix, 82 leaves : col. ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes: Thesis typescript. University of Otago department: Zoology. "21 December, 2007." Thesis (M. Sc.)--University of Otago, 2008. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Aqua, aqua, undique : aspects of Roman domestic water use

    Harrison-Sim, Michelle (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    282 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Bibliography: l. 264-282. University of Otago department: Classics. "June 2007."

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  • An investigation into the thesis/dissertation writing experiences of Mandarin-speaking Masters students in New Zealand

    Chang, Evelyn Chiungying (2007-05-28)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This study explores the perceptions of Mandarin-speaking Masters students involved in the thesis/dissertation writing process. As Mandarin-speaking students form a sizeable part of the EAL [English as Additional Language] postgraduate cohort in New Zealand, it is important to explore their experiences. The aim of the proposed study is to provide an opportunity for these learners to express issues that are pertinent to them in this area. The study recruited 37 Masters Students from five universities to participate in the survey; 6 of these participants volunteered to be interviewed. Two aspects of the participants' perceptions were examined: the acquisition of academic literacy in English and the role of the supervisor in relation to their thesis writing. Findings indicated that students had underestimated how difficult it would be to study at this level in a foreign language and in a new sociocultural environment. They also indicated that the language assistance provided by supervisors was perceived to be very helpful and that mutual understanding and personal interaction between supervisors and students is crucial for successful supervision. However, better structured academic and pastoral support is required from the host universities. In addition, participants placed great emphasis on their personal growth and learning. The significance of the study lies in its cross-cultural accounts of the underlying complexities involved in EAL thesis writing. Findings underline the need for New Zealand universities to recognise the importance of cross-cultural awareness and its role in fostering campuses that are interculturally friendly.

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  • The service quality of Māori tourism operators : a gap analysis

    Renata, Steven M (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis examines the nature and elements of Māori involvement in tourism using a dyadic assessment of operator service quality. The SERVQUAL instrument has been proposed as an instrument for the measurement of perceived service quality within a wide range of service categories. The current research examines both the operation of the scale and its management implications in four major sectors of the New Zealand tourism industry. Data for this study was collected through random mall intercept using a judgemental nonprobability sample of leading Māori tourism operators. In total, two hundred and thirteen useable responses formed the basis of the results. Major outcomes of the study reveal that; the conceptualisation and measurement of Māori cultural impacts on service encounters is problematic due the difficulty in defining who and what is Māori; the definition and measurement of service quality as a five dimensional construct as in SERVQUAL appears to suffer from a number of methodological shortcomings. For researchers in the process of using SERVQUAL, the results of this study suggest to exercise caution. Suggestions are provided with implications for instrument modification. The final outcome of the study reveals that the service quality of Māori tourism operators contains significant service gaps highlighting potential strengths and weakness and profiles of sector specific characteristics for the future development of this tourism field.

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  • Terrestrial spatial ecology of female New Zealand sea lions: Study at Sandy Bay, Auckland Islands, and implication for the management of the recolonisation

    Auge, Amelie A. (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The New Zealand sea lion, Phocarctos hookeri, is endemic to New Zealand and has only three breeding colonies, all situated in the sub-Antarctic islands. This reduced breeding distribution is the result of human extirpation from most of its pristine range, which included the New Zealand mainland. In 1993, a female bred for the first time on mainland New Zealand, indicating the possible start of the recolonisation. The recolonisation of an urbanised coastline will create interactions between humans, infrastructures and sea lions. No study had however looked at how the New Zealand sea lion uses its terrestrial environment. This study thus aimed to characterise, in space and time, the terrestrial spatial ecology of the female New Zealand sea lions at a breeding colony. Intensive fieldwork at the Sandy Bay breeding colony, Enderby Island, in the Auckland Islands, during two breeding seasons (between December 2001 and March 2003), produced a large dataset of daily Global Positioning System (GPS) locations of branded females onshore (4252 locations) within the study area (0.7 km²). A habitat type map and a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the study area were produced. The analyses were conducted in ArcGIS at three scales: individual, population and habitat. A two-phase pattern, including a harem phase (aggregation of females, area used < 0.003 km²) and a dispersion phase (spread of females, area used > 0.550 km²), was revealed and characterised using Nearest Neighbour Indices. A dispersion model of an average female was produced based on cumulative Minimum Convex Polygons (MCP) and pup mortality was found to be affected by females’ movements on pupping day. The female population was found to move and shift areas used throughout the dispersion phase while the gregariousness of females was considerably modified between the harem phase and the end of the dispersion phase (80 versus 0.3 females per 100 m²). Temporal analyses of habitat use demonstrated a radical change in habitat preferences between the two phases and a gradual change during the dispersion phase. At the end of the season, females preferred sites in forest and at more than 1.1 km from shore. Male aggressiveness and disturbance, habitat properties and parasite infections are thought to be some of the main factors that drive the terrestrial ecology of the females P. hookeri. In conclusion, the presence and spatial extent of a female population at Sandy Bay, unusual for a pinniped species, was found to be predictable and thought to be species- specific rather than location-specific. The results of this study can thus be used as a basis for the management of the recolonisation. Human infrastructure and disturbance are likely to interfere with the establishment of new breeding colonies and the ecology of female New Zealand sea lions on mainland New Zealand. Some recommendations based on these results are immediate public awareness and education programs, the monitoring of the new population using a GIS database and the identification, protection against human disturbance and rehabilitation of suitable sites for the establishment of a new breeding colony on the mainland.

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  • Health and support for students

    Korgaonkar, Sulekha W (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Format: xiii, 173, [17] leaves : illustrated; 30 cm.

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  • Faith Singing

    Harford, Donald L. (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Preface : I have a wonderful heritage of church music given to me from my time as a boy growing up in the Salvation Army. I remember as a pre-schooler sitting next to my father in the Salvation Army band as he played the trombone in Sunday morning worship. Praise to God was double forte accompanied by a brass-band. During my early years our house was often filled with Salvation Army brass band and songster (church choir) music. Church of England hymns added to my adolescent understanding of the church song through week-day school assemblies and compulsory Sunday night chapel services for secondary school boarders in Zimbabwe. Time spent worshipping as an adult in Baptist and Presbyterian churches has further shaped my faith and added to my expression of worship through a widening palette of church hymns and songs. One Sunday more recently, I was standing in church singing and found myself struggling to bring any sense of worship to God with the words on the screen. I had spent the hour before church walking and praying in preparation for this worship time. The words left me isolated from my desire to focus on God in this communal setting. The song meant nothing to me. I had sung these words before, but they did not express the quality of worship I had experienced the hour previous, and I longed for silence as this would have been better than the amplified singing of the music group and the rather poor sound from the congregation. It was during this time that I began consciously looking at the words of our worship songs and started asking questions about them. For most of my life it had been the music that had captured me, and I was startled by this new quest. Questions confronted me: Are the words we sing in worship important? And if they are then how important in shaping our faith? My concerns about the widening gap between the life that we were singing about in church worship, and the reality of life in the world outside of the church walls, began to haunt me. God sees a broken world and his answer to this brokenness is Christ’s death and resurrection, yet my own church community seldom sings about the brokenness God sees. I began to wonder if in the lyrics of these songs we sing, we had somehow domesticated God. I started to ask whether these words were designed more for our own comfort than for the worship of God. Marva Dawn’s book Reaching Out Without Dumbing Down[1] gave further shape to my thinking. She believes that ‘we dumb down the truth about God in a false effort to feel better about ourselves.[2] If Marva Dawn’s proposition is true, I wondered, would it be reflected in the lyrics we sing communally in worship? Do we have a rounded theology in our lyrics? Are our congregational lyrics offering us a well- balanced expression of the Christian faith? My recent worship experience, and Marva Dawn’s comments raised unsettling questions that have given me the motivation to explore further. I invite you to join me on this journey. [1] Marva Dawn, Reaching Out Without Dumbing Down (Grand Rapids: William B Eerdmanns 1995). [2] Ibid., 91.

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  • The Modern Catechumenate in the Diocese of Christchurch, 1993-2002

    Fergus, Donald M. (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Introduction : The Modern Catechumenate In The Diocese Of Christchurch. At its heart, the Catechumenate is about forming and energizing Gospel practitioners. Joel Green and Mark Baker conclude their book Recovering the Scandal of the Cross: Atonement in New Testament and Contemporary Contexts, by wondering how, in this day and age, we might “articulate the saving significance of the cross.” "The shape of discipleship in the Gospels...and the theological content of the New Testament (taken together)...suggest that (1) following Jesus is focussed on transformation of faith and life...and (2) faithfulness is a process or journey of working out the significance and implications of the gospel in the face of new challenges. Doing theology, then, is not a matter of repeating the tradition or committing to memory a ten-step manual. It has to do with formation as practitioners of the gospel. To whom (then) shall we apprentice ourselves?"[1] Which is exactly the complex question every Christian leader and believer must find an answer to as they construct a dynamic response to the matter of becoming a follower of Jesus. Over the last 50 years or so, a huge amount of energy and time has gone into the re- discovery and re-animation of the time-honoured practice of catechetical instruction and training as one particular attempt at an answer to the question “How are gospel practitioners to be formed”? Early in the 1990s the Anglican Diocese of Christchurch launched the Catechumenate. There was a disturbing outcome; this attempt to implement an ancient and honourable mode of Christian instruction, formation and baptismal preparation failed to gain any traction and within a decade disappeared from view as a significant Diocesan and parish [1] Joel B. Green and Mark D. Baker (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2000), 216.

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  • Effects of Closing a Small Rural Church

    Ennor, Laurence H. (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Introduction : This project is based on the hypothesis that the closure of a small rural church is a traumatic event in the life of the church and the surrounding community, evoking feelings of loss and grief, which if treated in a sensitive and pastoral way enables people to accept their losses while looking for new opportunities. The central focus of the project is St James Church, Sheffield, a small rural town 50 kilometres west of Christchurch, and 13 kilometres west of Darfield, the main centre of the Malvern area. This church was previously St James Presbyterian Church and from 1979 it has been part of the Malvern Co-operating Parish, although most of the regular worshippers still think of themselves as Presbyterian. The St James Church was opened in 1910 but is now showing the effects of its age and will soon become unsafe to use as water has seeped in behind the exterior cladding (applied in 1959), causing an unknown amount of damage to the framing timber. There are currently 8 to 12 regular worshippers, and 37 on the pastoral roll. The church will have to be closed, but some of the regulars would rather not face this fact. Part 1 of the project sets the scene. As a way into the topic I explore some of the words of the hypothesis, e.g., church, small, rural, and consider some ways of classifying what is rural. Part 2 is about rural New Zealand. Rural New Zealand has its own characteristics. In order to understand what is happening in Sheffield, it is important to understand the nature of a rural community. I discuss Bill Bennett’s theology of the land and his rural spirituality from his book, God of the Whenua, together with what has happened to rural New Zealand over the last 40 years, as well as changes in the church during that time. Part 3 focuses on Sheffield in relation to rural New Zealand. In general Sheffield reflects the rural scene throughout New Zealand, but with some local differences. Having described Sheffield in Part 3, Part 4 is about what is happening to the church people of Sheffield as they contemplate the almost inevitable closure of their church in the not-too-distant future. I discuss the feelings of people who have lost many businesses, services and community groups from their community. If their church closes it will be yet another blow to them. Part 5 is about losses. People leave churches for many reasons other than the church being closed. I discuss the work of Alan Jamieson who has studied why people leave Evangelical, Pentecostal and Charismatic churches, but who still have a living faith in God. I also look at the experience of other churches in New Zealand and other countries when a church has been closed. Part 6 looks at some possible opportunities after the closure of a church. What is the way ahead? There is some discussion about ways of helping people pastorally during the time of change. Methodology : For collecting the main part of the data for this project I chose to interview most of the members of the St James Church (some were unavailable for interview). Because there are only a small number of regular worshippers at St James, Sheffield, there is a very restricted interview base, which meant that there was a risk of distortion of opinions, the sample not being big enough to detect trends. Due also to the small interview base, this project is essentially a case study. In order to try to correct the possibility of distortion and to gain a wider perspective I contacted other people in New Zealand and overseas, and have also studied literature from Australia, Canada and Britain. In addition I have interviewed some people from the Sheffield community who do not attend St James. I was given a very comprehensive summary of the Sheffield area and church from the editor of The Malvern Record, who has an interest in the history of the area. It would have been helpful for this project to have attendance figures for St James Church over the last 20 years, but these are not available as they are combined for statistical purposes with the numbers for the whole parish. I have spoken with the minister of the Parish during the 1980s about attendances during that decade. I am the ordained minister of the Malvern Co-operating Parish, and there could have been a risk that the rôles of minister and researcher conflict with one another. I feel that the people I interviewed from St James were honest and open in their responses, despite my being their minister. The research has helped me to understand the local church and surrounding community in a much deeper way than would perhaps have been possible with normal pastoral contacts. My term in the parish concludes in early 2010, and so I could very likely be the minister who has to close this church.

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  • Accord and satisfaction by way of full settlement cheque

    Currie, Simon Colin (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 225 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "November 4, 2007". University of Otago department: Law.

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  • A nascent breeding population of New Zealand sea lions at Otago, southeast South Island

    Jackson, Josephine (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    New Zealand sea lions, Phocarctos hookeri, are one of the least abundant pinniped species and practically all breeding is restricted to the Auckland Islands and Campbell Island. They were extirpated from the New Zealand mainland by hunting following human colonisation. The philopatric nature of sea lions restricts their capacity to colonise new areas. New Zealand sea lions were declared a threatened species in 1997. The primary aim of the population management plan is to achieve non-threatened status within 20 years, which is contingent on new breeding locations (>35 mature females exhibiting breeding philopatry) being established outside the subantarctic population base. Otago, southeast South Island, is the only location north of the Auckland Islands with sustained annual breeding. Breeding was initiated at Otago by a solitary migrant female in the 1993/1994 season. Otago beaches were surveyed from December 2003 to June 2004 and during the 2004/2005, 2005/2006 and 2006/2007 breeding seasons. Individuals were identifiable by flipper tags and diagnostic natural body features. A total of 28-29 pups were born at Otago Peninsula (all in the lineage of the founding female) from 1993/1994 to the 2005/2006 breeding season. Results from this study indicate the initiation of colonial breeding since all breeding females and their pups were based at the same sites for the 13 years since breeding began and all Otago-born juvenile females remained in contact with mothers and pups. Two pups were born in the Catlins in the 2005/2006 and 2006/2007 seasons to a new resident immigrant female indicating potential for a new breeding location to develop. Results from a Leslie matrix model predicted the Otago population will reach >35 breeding females between 2018-2034: 21-37 years from 1997, at rates of annual increase of 6-15%. The average age of primiparity was earlier at Otago than at the Auckland Islands. At stable population demography in the model, four year old females at Otago made up 13-17% of the breeding population compared to 1% for four year olds at the Auckland Islands. Survival of Otago born pups to one year was high (86% to 93%). Mothers at Otago had shorter attendance pattern and foraging cycle durations than mothers at the Auckland Islands indicating that Otago is a more favourable foraging environment. The combination of these findings leads to the conclusion that Otago represents a superior breeding location for New Zealand sea lions compared to the Auckland Islands in terms of environmental conditions.

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  • Malcolm Ross : a forgotten casualty of the Great War

    Palenski, Ron (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis examines the role of Malcolm Ross as the New Zealand official war correspondent during World War I and compares his performance and influence with that of his Australian counterpart, C. E. W. Bean. It outlines Ross's early life and attitudes to provide context for his appointment and explains the circumstances leading to his appointment, which were accompanied by terms and conditions that restricted his ability to perform the duties required of him. Criticism of Ross is explored in the context of the political climate in New Zealand; criticism of war correspondents generally is examined in the light of censorship and other government or military restrictions on what could be written. Despite the restrictions and criticisms, Ross was a prolific, active correspondent from 1915 until 1919. Comparisons with Bean are made throughout, both in terms of reporting during the war and post-war, especially with the effects on war historiography in New Zealand and Australia. The thesis concludes that while Ross was the most suitably qualified applicant for the unique position - the only official war correspondent to be employed by the New Zealand Government - his employers imposed restrictions that diluted the power of his pen. Ross paled into a historiographical insignificance compared with Bean, but the fault was not Ross's alone.

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  • The Special Court for Sierra Leone: Justice for whom?

    Mahony, Christopher (2007)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The thesis examined the divergence of conceptions of justice between civil society actors in Sierra Leone and personnel working at the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

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  • An introduction to agent-based modelling

    Green, Peter (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Agent-based models give us a way to model the aggregation of heterogeneous agent s, a feat that is nearly impossible in a deductive framework. Because these models cannot be solved exactly, they will often be explored using computer simulations. Computers are an important tool in this field, but they are not central to the methodology. A simple model like Schelling's can be investigated using a few toys from the games cupboard. The ability to program simulated models is a lower barrier to entry than the ability to build tractable analytical models. As a result the field is tending towards breadth rather than depth. Creating a new model ex nihilo is more straightforward and more rewarding than adapting an existing model (Axelrod 2003). This creative "anarchy" makes it difficult to compare and to replicate results (Leombruni et al. 2006). The methodology itself is promising though, and a more disciplined approach could make significant contributions to economics. This review presents the motivation behind agent-based modelling, and its epistemological justification. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Agent-based modelling of monopsony and the minimum wage

    Green, Peter (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    A simple supply and demand argument apparently shows that minimum wage policy, ironically, hurts the workers it is ostensibly aimed at helping, by increasing their chances of unemployment. Stigler (1946) claims that economists should be “outspoken, and singularly agreed” on the issue. While the profession happily achieves the former, they are a long way from the latter (Klein & Dompe 2007). Early last century, SidneyWebb (1912) claimed that minimum wage laws had increased productivity growth, both by drawing employers attention away from cost-cutting and towards productivity improvements, and by providing a relative advantage to high-wage firms. Today, this is backed up by mathematical models (e.g. Cahuc & Michel 1996, Acemoglu 2001). Recent studies — the “new economics” of the minimum wage — have provided more ambiguous evidence about employment effects. Monopsony models have become fashionable since they were used to account for increases in employment in Card & Krueger’s (1995a) Myth and Measurement. Although the word “monopsony” initially referred to markets with a single buyer, the modern usage refers to models where individual buyers face upward sloping supply curves. Despite the shift in meaning, the term still carries some stigma, especially if it is used in contexts where the assumption of one buyer would not be credible (Boal & Ransom 1997). This project investigates whether a simple agent-based model is better described by a competitive model or by a monopsony model, and what implications this has for minimum wage policy. Two models were built. The first is a toy model which simply reproduces a competitive model in simulation form. The second, based on search models of labour markets, exhibits behaviour similar to a monopsony model. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Going home? : the fate of children who leave care

    Coote, Pania (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Thesis typescript. University of Otago department: Social Work and Community Development. "18th January 2007."

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