756 results for Masters, 2009

  • Charles Begg and Company Limited : the story of music in New Zealand is the history of Begg's

    Gleeson, Jean Clare (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 143 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "December 2009". University of Otago department: History

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  • "Body snatching" in contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand : a legal conflict between cultures

    Brandt, Bettina (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The main purpose of this thesis is to consider whether legal sanctions would be capable of deterring the practice of "body snatching," and, if so, whether the law should be reformed in New Zealand to clarify the legal situation of ownership in, and burial of, a dead body. The project will involve an analysis of existing law, proposed law changes, tikanga Māori, and comparative law elements. It will examine and synthesise primary and secondary legal sources, including relevant case law and statutory law. More specifically, the research aim is to provide an explanation of the legal aspects of the "body snatching" issue within Aotearoa/New Zealand, as it occurs within bicultural Māori and Pākehā families. [Extract from Introduction]

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  • The protection of terrestrial biological diversity and climate change : an environmental law perspective

    Hederich, Wiebke (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiii, 182 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "16 October 2009". University of Otago department: Law

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  • Alleviating fuel poverty in NZ through improving the energy efficiency of the residential sector

    Callaú, Maria Fernanda (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 175 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Physics

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  • Identification of the floral source of New Zealand honeys

    Petchell, Laura Eleanor (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Depending on the nectar source, honey is either unifloral (derived mostly from one plant type), or polyfloral (derived from multiple plant types). Unifloral honey has characteristic sensory properties, and is therefore of greater commercial value. Currently, identification of floral source involves pollen counting, a specialised and labour intensive process. The current research was aimed at developing an alternative, rapid, chemistry-based method of floral identification. The aroma of honey depends on volatile compounds present; these may be derived from the plant from which nectar was taken. Therefore by identifying volatiles in honey it could be possible to identify floral source. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is a technique that is useful for the headspace analysis of volatile compounds; when coupled with GC-MS it provides a powerful tool for fingerprinting volatiles in honey. GC-MS chromatograms of ten New Zealand unifloral honey types were obtained after headspace SPME extraction. Statistical analysis of the GC-MS chromatographic data was used to discriminate between floral types. Probability plots were used to identify compounds indicative of floral source; this method discriminated between honey types with 90% success. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to study the structure of the data. Learning algorithms in Weka (machine-learning software) were used to build models of data to classify honey types. The logistic model tree algorithm classified 89.8% of samples correctly. Such a model has the potential to be used to classify future honey samples, once further samples have been tested to validate the model.

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  • Bullying the boss : upwards bullying as a response to destructive supervisory leadership in the workplace.

    Wallace, Belinda (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Despite a growing acknowledgement of the negative outcomes for organizational functioning and the health and well-being of individuals attributable to workplace bullying, research into the phenomenon of upward bullying (supervisors bullied by their subordinates), particularly its aetiology, has received modest attention. The aim of the present study was to explore the link between destructive supervisory leadership and upward bullying and the mediating or moderating roles of perceived interactional justice, continuance commitment and workrelated meaning in this relationship. Two hundred and eight post-graduate students and two hundred and four work-based subordinate employees completed an on-line survey of their perceptions of the leadership style and interactional justice of their immediate supervisor, the levels of their own continuance commitment and work-related meaning, and the frequency with which they engaged in specific bullying behaviours targeting their supervisor. As expected, subordinate perceptions of destructive supervisory leadership were strongly associated with an increased incidence of upward bullying, with the strength of this relationship partially mediated by subordinate perceptions of interactional justice within supervisory interactions. In addition, subordinate levels of continuance commitment and work-related meaning moderated the relationship between subordinate perceptions of interactional justice and the incidence of upward bullying, such that this relationship was intensified when either, or both the level of subordinate continuance commitment or work-related meaning was higher. This paper offers preliminary support for conceptualizing upwards bullying as a retaliatory response to destructive leadership, however due to a reliance on cross-sectional data, inferences of causality cannot be made. Practical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

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  • How does the concept of guanxi help foreign managers do business in China?

    Jiang, Nanqian (Katie) (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    China's fast growing market potential is undoubted. However entering China has never been an easy task for foreign firms and business practitioners. Not only the complex market environment, but also the complex business relationship networks in another word, Guanxi make it difficult for foreign firms to operate profitably. The purpose of this study is to explore some major issues of Guanxi concept, and to provide some practical solutions for foreign managers to use when dealing with Guanxi in their businesses. Both qualitative research and quantitative research were carried out. The author interviewed nine Chinese and foreign managers and surveyed hundreds of respondents in several industries. The findings confirm Guanxi's important role in Chinese society and business world. This study also discovers some major practical issues that could influence quality of Guanxi, either positively or negatively, which gives foreign managers great direction on initiation and maintenance of their Guanxi network. The findings suggest that learning some Chinese culture and having a reliable Chinese partner have positive effect on building Guanxi networks. However, this study shows a quite different result on future role of Guanxi compared with existing literatures: the role of Guanxi would either not change, or increase in China in the future. In addition, foreign managers need to be aware that Guanxi is indeed important, but it does not mean everything in market activities, the core marketing principles are always essential in any market, including China.

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  • Analysis of forecasted travel time benefits against those realised

    Keshaboina, Akhylesh (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    There is lack of knowledge on how well the transport projects work once implemented. This research project seeks to investigate how the forecasted benefits claimed during the economic appraisal of the projects compare with the actual benefits realised. This study carried out a literature review on how the travel time benefits are forecasted for transport investment projects and comments on general to specific issues like value of travel time, international and local experiences of forecasting travel time savings to use of traffic modelling in forecasting travel time savings. The study also carried out a post-construction evaluation of projects on a diverse range of transport projects from realignments, grade separated interchange to the installation of HOV lanes and urban bypass project. Post-construction analysis was carried out and then compared against those assumed for the pre-construction evaluation and possible reasons for the differences were discussed.

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  • The role of social-pragmatic cues in word learning: a neural network model

    Caza, Gregory Andrew (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Human infants begin to produce speech at the beginning of the second year of life. Some theories propose that language is acquired by simply recognising statistical properties in linguistic input. Other hypotheses consider the interactive environments in which humans are raised, looking for links between emerging social skills and word learning. The social-pragmatic theory of language acquisition suggests that the foundation of word learning is an ability to read the intentions of another, especially the intention to communicate (Akhtar and Tomasello, 2000). The theory posits a special role for the ability to respond to joint attention, a form of intention recognition which has been shown to facilitate word learning (Baldwin, 1993). Social-pragmatic theory argues that the cognitive abilities that develop in the second year of life are not merely coincidental, but are an essential component of language acquisition. The first goal of this thesis is to develop a neural network model to investigate word learning by implementing key concepts of the social-pragmatic theory. Cognitive skills that develop in the second year of life are shown to facilitate word learning, with the model reproducing characteristics of the ’vocabulary spurt’ that can be seen around 18 months of age (O’Grady, 2005). The second goal is to relate the model to current neurobiological research. The neural correlates of intention recognition and lexical retrieval are tentatively defined, permitting a discussion of the brain regions common to both processes. The prefrontal cortex, in particular, is discussed to investigate how its general functions could be harnessed by mechanisms for word learning and intention recognition. One novel contribution of the model is to tie together joint attention and word learning using a rewardbased learning scheme.

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  • Believing Like Never Before: Identity and Christian Conversion in a Fragmented World

    Czerwonka, Alex (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Believing Like Never Before: Identity and Christian Conversion in a Fragmented World. The purpose of this study is to explore the possibility that the experience of identity and faith formation has changed since the 1990s due to changes in society brought about by the growing complexity and fragmentation of society reflected in the multiplication of media sources and the methods of communication. The study is structured in two parts: Part 1) A literature review to cover the areas of a) Identity formation and faith formation. b) A review of various understandings of Christian conversion, including case studies of some biographical accounts of conversion Part 2) An exploration through survey questionnaires and interviews of the experience of conversion, in two groups of at least five people each of: a) those born before 1965, b) those born between 1980 and 1990, The findings indicate that there have been significant changes to the understanding of conversion over time influenced by changes in the social environment and the development of personal identify. These changes are subtle but they do inevitably impact on how the church should approach the task of evangelism and faith formation.

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  • Inclusion or Exclusion: Perceptions of Acceptance by People with Mental and Intellectual Disabilities in Otago and Southland Baptist Churches

    Lee, Christopher Rex (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The author conducted qualitative research with twenty people with mental or intellectual disability who attended Baptist churches in the Southland and Otago regions to determine whether from their point of view the churches were inclusive of people with theirdisabilities or whether people with disabilities were excluded from feeling part of the church. To the researchers surprise and contrary to previously published literature, those churches which identified people with disabilities and provided specialist services under the umbrella of an inclusive church were found to be most inclusive by participants in the study.

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  • Youth and Liturgy: an Oxymoron? A study into how and why Anglican liturgy and the Anglican liturgical tradition are being used in worship targeting young people within the Anglican Church (Tikanga Pakeha) in New Zealand.

    Hebenton, John (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This research used a mixed method approach to explore how and why Anglican liturgy and the Anglican liturgical tradition are being used in worship targeting youth and young adults in the Anglican Church (Tikanga Pakeha) in New Zealand. It comes out of my experience of attending a number of non-liturgical services at various youth events which seem hard to describe as Anglican. It also comes out of the wider church‟s concern about the future of liturgy, particularly as expressed in a recent memorandum from the Common Life Liturgical Commission. In this study I have offered a description of Anglican liturgy and the Anglican liturgical tradition. Questionnaires were run in two dioceses, and four case studies were examined. These found that most of those with responsibility for worship targeting young people describe themselves as Anglican. It was also found that their decision on whether or not and how to use Anglican liturgy or the Anglican liturgical tradition was significantly influenced by their understanding and past experience of Anglican liturgy, their understanding of the service‟s aim, and their experience of similar services or gatherings. When the past experience has been negative they have looked elsewhere for models on which to base their worship. Even when they appreciate this tradition many still have questions about its appropriateness with young people. This has led me to question what is being done to make liturgy accessible to young people. The use of the Anglican liturgical tradition was also shaped by: the need to be missional; the desire by parishes to offer significantly different services; and the level of training, mentoring and support offered. This study has led to some suggestions for future research, particularly on the issues of: the relationship between worship and mission; what help and support young people are receiving to participate meaningfully in Anglican liturgy; and what training and support for those running worship is being currently offered These suggested areas of further research give rise to several recommendations for the wider church that will enhance our offering of the liturgical tradition to young people and will hopefully help liturgy live and breathe with a new generation.

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  • Spirituality, Culture and Place: The Rainbow Temple in NSW, Australia

    Fogel, Ron (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis is about the Rainbow Temple in Byron Shire, NSW, Australia. The diverse belief systems and the symbolic behaviours practiced by people who live at the Rainbow Temple constitute a particular identity assigned predominantly with what I call “Rainbow culture”. This culture is derived and constituted from the Rainbow Tribe gatherings practiced all around the world. The Rainbow Tribe (or the Rainbow Family) is an international affiliation of individuals who share common belief and identity systems, who gather periodically and intentionally to practice exclusive rituals and ceremonies. This study shows that the Rainbow Temple functions as a multi-cultural sphere and encapsulates various cultural and religious properties that cohere to and are associated with those exhibited in Rainbow Tribe gatherings. Initially, according to its founder, the Rainbow Temple was not meant to have an affiliation with the Rainbow Tribe, but over time the Temple has evolved an association with Rainbow culture. Participants and informants recognize the Rainbow Temple as a “gathering” sphere or as a “centre” for Rainbow Tribe spirit, and attribute meanings of sacredness and inviolability to the Temple. I will examine these attributes and claim that they are part of a larger context. To portray a viable ontological reality and explain the cultural occurrences in the Rainbow Temple, I have relied on three streams of knowledge. First, I have investigated similar recorded cases and relevant theories about identity systems, new religions and New Age spirituality. Second, I have gathered the descriptions, comments and reflections of the people who live at the Rainbow Temple. And third, I have considered my own experiences with the Rainbow Tribe and my fieldwork at the Rainbow Temple. While on the surface, the cultural occurrences at the Temple seem to be a mishmash of ideas and practices, in this thesis I argue that there is a consistent ideology behind the confusion. I examine the foundations of some of the cultural processes and the symbolic behaviours which constitute Rainbow culture and Rainbow identity.

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  • Markerless motion capture applied to the analysis of locomotor kinematics in the semi-aquatic hunting spider, Dolomedes aquaticus

    Pullar, Kiri (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis focuses on two key goals. Firstly, developing a markerless motion capture technique for the examination of joint angles during spider locomotion. Secondly, applying this technique to understanding gait and gait generating mechanisms in the semi-aquatic hunting spider, Dolomedes aquaticus. I present a markerless technique for reconstructing 2D joint angles during locomotion based on information contained in video frames and a spider model based on the relative lengths of segments and joint angle limits. This algorithm allows gait analysis without the need for a sophisticated lab setup. Analysis is based on the subject filmed by a stationary video camera. Techniques that recover body pose from video sequences with little user intervention have numerous applications such as motion capture, gesture recognition, surveillance of people or animals and animation for movies or computer games. The spiders’ pose is estimated in every frame of a video sequence. The basic elements of my tracking approach include an articulated body model, extracted features from video frames and various constraints. These components are combined in a Bayesian framework, which segments the frame into foreground and subject and estimates the pose of the subject. Joint angles are used to investigate gait and gait generating mechanisms underlying locomotion in the spider. Firstly, kinematic parameters were compared to mass and body length of spiders. Stride length was the only kinematic parameter to yield significant results compared to spider size, however non-significant scaling relationships were similar in magnitude to those in the literature. Secondly, kinematic parameters were analysed in relation to speed of locomotion. Stride frequency showed a greater correlation with normalized speed than absolute speed and stride length showed a greater correlation with absolute speed than normalized speed. This suggests that larger animals increase their speed by increasing stride length, whereas it is possible for smaller animals to increase their speed by increasing stride frequency. Contrary to the relationship frequently observed in insects, both protraction and retraction periods decreased with speed. Thirdly, changes in velocity and acceleration were compared across the trajectory of each pair of legs and the ipsilateral and contralateral coordination of legs was investigated. Each leg was found to contribute in a specific manner to locomotion. Movements of front legs were random, suggesting they play some other role, possibly sensory, rather than contributing to stability. Legs 2 and 3 appeared to play a more dominant role in generating propulsive force, with hind legs probably contributing more to stability than propulsion.

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  • The Dissipation of Indigeneity Through Religion

    Te Rire, Jonathan H A (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    MAOR 590 Research Report for a Masters of Indigenous Studies (MIndS) - http://www.otago.ac.nz/minds/

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  • Evaluating the impact of the School of Business digital repository

    Sanmaneechai, Charupol (2009-06-12)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Otago EPrints is an open access institutional repository at the School of Business, University of Otago. Authors within the school can deposit their work such as journal articles, working/discussion papers, conference papers, theses/dissertation and other research findings. There has been relatively little evaluation of the use of the Otago EPrints repository, especially with regard to the participation of academic staff and research students (undergraduate, postgraduate and postdoctoral). This thesis describes the findings of a study of authors from the School of Business, with the aim of determining the current state of an author’s publishing experience, attitude, concerns, knowledge, awareness and use of the School of Business EPrints repository. The findings suggest that Otago EPrints is underpopulated and underused when compared to institutional repositories in other institutions. Moreover, most authors have no motivation to use and little knowledge of Otago EPrints, and some of them still hold some opinions or concerns that have caused them to remain detached from the repository. However, a number of authors have already engaged with the open access movement by making their research outputs publicly available in personal and departmental web sites, as well as in some other open access digital repositories. This implies that it should not be too difficult to persuade them to deposit their research outputs into the repository as they are already familiar with the concepts of open access and depositing papers online. This research suggests improvements in the process of increasing author awareness and deposit rates; and informs the School of Business division and repository development team of an appropriate service model and workflow for the future.

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  • Influence of Visual Grouping and Temporal Attention on Temporal Resolution: Evidence from a Temporal Order Judgment (TOJ) Task

    Keller, Armin (2009-10)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Time appears to pass in slow motion, according to subjective reports of people who have been involved in car accidents or other extreme situations. Previous research attributed time’s subjective expansion (TSE) to the engagement of attention and its influence on the amount of perceptual information processed (Tse et al., 2004). We propose that two processes contribute to slow motion perception in TSE. One is grouping attributes of the scene into wholes and segregating them from their background. Another is an increased amount of attention to temporal properties of the extreme scene. The present thesis investigates the influence of visual grouping and temporal attention on temporal resolution in a less dramatic situation to reveal whether novel or important events perceived in slow motion may indeed be processed in greater depth per unit of objective time than are normal events as assumed by Tse et al. (2004). A temporal order judgment (TOJ) task was applied at 50 participants to measure temporal resolution. A grouping effect was induced by use of a bar stimulus to unify the background on which two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) flashed. Two squares, one forming the background of each separate LED, comprised a control condition for the unified one just described. Attention to temporal properties of the background stimuli was induced by the use of abrupt stimuli which appeared with a specific temporal interval prior to the onset of either LED. In the control condition, the background stimuli were displayed persistently throughout the whole trial rather than abruptly. Temporal resolution was significantly higher when either visual grouping or temporal attention induced by abrupt stimuli was present and highest when both were combined. This novel finding provides evidence that multiple processes are involved leading to increased temporal resolution during TSE.

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  • Trigger Factor and its involvement in the repair of Photosystem II

    Tuohy, Simon (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Replacement of the photosynthetic D1 protein is essential for continuation of photosynthesis and the life of a plant or cyanobacteria. Trigger Factor (TF) is an approximately 52 kDa molecular chaperone which may bind the ribosome-D1 complex prior to the association with the thylakoid targeted Signal Recognition Particle (cpSRP54). Trigger Factor binds to nearly all ribosomes, hence it is feasible that TF binds D1 protein and stalls until cpSRP54 can target it to SecY. The aim of this research was to create a TFSpec mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 which would allow the characterisation of the TFSpec phenotype and to characterise the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 TF protein. The TFSpec strain showed several physiological differences from Wild Type (WT). The rate of O2 evolution by the TFSpec strain was slower than for the WT strain over the same period, and the growth rates of the TFSpec strain was lower than the WT strain. Trigger Factor was also differentially detected in various cellular fractions when pelleted with ribosomes purified from cells grown under different light con- ditions. Biophysical analysis of TF was done by Circular Dichroism and Dynamic Light Scattering to determine the structural similarity with TF from other species. Crystallisation of TF was also attempted. Implications of this research are discussed.

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  • Affording New Zealand rivers legal personality : a new vehicle for achieving Maori aspirations in co-management?

    Morris, James Douglas Kahotea (2009-06)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Appendix 1. Professor Alex Frame's 'Treaty Title Bill' -- Appendix 2. Official document #1: A. Frame, "Legal models for cooperation between Maori and the Crown in control of land and resources" (1991) (11 p.) -- Appendix 3. Official document #2: A. Frame, "Natural resources and the Treaty of Waitangi : an analysis of law and policy" (1992) (20, iii p.) -- Appendix 4. Model legislation: The Rivers Bill.

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  • Impact of measurement and accountability on non government organisation social work practice

    Weir, Megan (2009-03)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This is a study of a Non Government Organisation’s (NGO) experience of funding contracts with the government to provide social services. In a general situation of increasing NGO frustration with narrowly based financial silo contracts, this community based NGO was able negotiate a new form of an outcome based, integrated contract. In contrast to conventional liberal, welfare state or third way (‘partnership’) theories such integrated contracts required an expanded form of broad based multiple accountability, to all stakeholders. The achievement of such accountability was explored in focus group interviews with the Otago Youth Wellness Trust (OYWT) to examine the experience of the NGO stakeholders and the resulting successes and frustrations. The NGO was able to create a new model of contract but ultimately frustrated in carrying this contract through into the performance of accountability relationships. Analysis identified the importance of power analysis in explaining this outcome. While a unified professional viewpoint was able to establish the leverage to initially develop the contractual relationship, it has struggled to sustain it in a situation of sole accountability to the government as funder. It is argued that integrated accountability must rest on shared accountability to all stakeholders and mutual accountability between them. Specific broad and multiple forms of audit are required to implement such accountability. It is categorically recommended that the NGO actively engage with its community stakeholders to develop such shared accountability mechanisms and processes.

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