13,134 results for Masters

  • You and me and shame

    Gillanders, Leah Esme (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This research project investigated the effects of bringing an as-yet-untold story of shame to a narrative therapy counselling conversation. The researcher, who became the client, invited a narrative practitioner to join her in three conversations, a counselling conversation and two interpersonal process recall conversations. The data generated from these conversations as well as the personal research diary kept by the researcher are woven together as research findings, presenting a layered, journeyed account of the movement experienced by the researcher. This study noticed the challenges of recognising and speaking stories of shame. Attention is given to noticing vulnerability and the difficulty of speaking stories of shame and also to the role of witnessing in the relationship between the counsellor and the client meeting within a context of shame. This autoethnographic account offers itself as practitioner researcher. Knowledges produced in this research highlight the importance of considering first the role of shame in the life of a problem and second how it is to be positioned as a client in a counselling relationship.

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  • Emotional Well-Being and Secondary Traumatic Stress in New Zealand Youth Workers

    Takhar-Stapleton, Amber (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This study aimed to explore the relationship of STS and emotional well-being among New Zealand youth workers using a qualitative approach. Eleven participants were interviewed for the study using a semi-structured interviewing technique. The purpose of this study was to fill a gap in the literature about the impact of working with traumatised youth and to identify if youth workers were at risk and vulnerable to the effects of trauma exposure. Three aims were incorporated in the study to answer the research question. The first aim was to explore ways in which youth work may be associated with decreased emotional well-being and STS with the second aim of identifying symptoms and causes of decreased emotional well-being and STS. Lastly, the third aim was to explore how decreased emotional well-being is associated with the development of STS. The findings suggest the majority of participants experienced moderate levels of decreased emotional well-being and displayed symptoms associated with the effects of secondary traumatic stress. The results confirmed the first aim of the study which identified youth work as being correlated with decreased emotional well-being and STS. The results suggested decreased emotional well-being increased vulnerability to developing STS and therefore, the third aim of the study was also confirmed. Several themes were found in the participants’ answers which revealed youth work is associated with emotional well-being and symptoms of STS. This included emotional detachment, suppression, and numbing, helplessness, burnout and lack of resources to cope, social withdrawal, difficulty sleeping and changes in appetite. Risk factors which appeared to increase vulnerability included personal trauma, PTSD, countertransference, and empathic engagement. Organisational stressors were also identified as increasing vulnerability which heavily influenced participants and contributed to extreme stress and exhaustion. Findings in this study contribute to the knowledge of secondary traumatic stress as well as increasing knowledge about the emotional effects of working with traumatised individuals. Furthermore, the study helps to educate helping professionals and increases knowledge of youth work.

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  • Barry Barclay: the Reflection of Maori and Pakeha Identities

    Hilal, Emad Jabbar (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This Media and Screen Studies thesis tries to investigate the identifications of Barry Barclay (1944-2008) - a New Zealand filmmaker, thinker and poet, of Māori and Pākeha ethnic background - who identified as Māori in the second part of his career, in the mid 1970s. The thesis relies on Barclay's writing and other historical and theoretical material in the reading of his own films. The thesis arrives at an argument that even when Barclay chose to identify more with the Māori side of his identity, the Pākeha side took part also in the shaping of his film practices. Studying Barry Barclay along this line of argument has several benefits for Screen Studies. It, on the one hand, covers what is left unstudied by the scholarship concerning his representation of the Māori world such as the way he commented on Māori cultural and social concerns and acheivements in his films. The thesis studies Barclay's films from the time he started his identification with his Māori side in Tangaata Whenua (1974), Te Urewera (1987), Ngati (1987),Te Rua (1991) and takes The Kaipara Affair (2005) as a case study and a carrier of change in film practices and development in outlook.The other important contribution is the way he represented Pākeha, and how he developed his representation of them in time. This representation which is unstudied at all, is important to Screen Studies becuase it contributes to Barclay's theory of Fourth Cinema. This thesis shows how representing Pakeha, especially in Barclay's last film problemematizes his theory of Fourth Cinema, but ultimately, deals with applies it creatively. The representation of Pākeha gives insight into Barclay's interest in the Māori world, which is not a dogma or a merely ethnic affiliation as much as an attraction to a world-view that can solve major universal issues such as environmental problems. Above all, the way how Barclay worked out this representation in his films sheds light on one of the important examples of how film can take part in healing social damages such as the history of colonizing and marginalization of Māori people.

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  • The Development of Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) in the Philippines: Roles and Views of Secondary School Principals

    Capili-Balbalin, Wenefe (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    It is widely recognised that principals play an indispensable role in the professional development of teachers in schools. In the Philippines, principals encourage teachers to participate in the traditional and most common approach to professional development such as conferences, seminars, workshops, and training. Despite documented benefits of these traditional approaches to teacher professional development, recent studies show that many teachers find them insufficient, inconsistent, and sometimes they do not necessarily address teachers’ classroom needs. There is a growing body of literature that recognises the importance of teacher engagement through professional learning communities (PLCs) as a new approach to teacher professional development. Unlike traditional approaches to teacher professional development, PLCs redefine professional development from programmes that regard teachers as passive learners to programmes that regard teachers as active learners who are responsible for their own professional growth. The study explored the roles and perspectives of secondary school principals in the development of PLCs in the Philippines. It is an underlying assumption that principals’ understanding of their roles in the implementation of teacher professional development policies in schools is central to the formation of PLCs. This raised two important questions that principals needed to contemplate: How did they view and implement national policies on teacher professional development in the school level? And, how did they perceive and establish PLCs in their schools? The study utilised a qualitative research methodology based on an interpretive paradigm. Through the use of semi-structured interviews alongside policy analysis, three main themes emerged: lack of continuing teacher professional development programmes in the Philippines; varying views of principals in the development of PLCs in schools; and, effective leadership styles as key to support continuing professional development of teachers. The lack of continuing teacher professional development programmes suggests that principals in the study failed to establish PLCs in their schools. This offers some important insights on the leadership experiences of principals in the implementation of national policies on professional development and how it affects their roles in supporting teachers’ continuing professional development. The study also reinforces theories around strong influence of school leadership in the formation of PLCs, particularly in developing countries such as the Philippines. This is an important issue for future work, as top-down leadership continuously predominates in school organisations in the Philippines. Further work is recommended to investigate the implications of this for the confidence level of principals in their leadership in the context of secondary schools in the Philippines.

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  • Adaptation to water scarcity in the context of climate change: A Case Study of the Nuku'alofa and Hihifo Districts, Tongatapu

    Fa'anunu, Jacqueline (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    For the most part, PICs and SIDS are constantly reminded of their vulnerability to climate change. Often, the increasing portrayal of island countries as vulnerable does not necessarily address what causes that vulnerability. The UNFCCC and IPCC have sought to adopt more adaptation measures alongside mitigation especially in vulnerability assessments. In the context of Tongatapu, adaptation in the water sector still holds significant political and economic challenges. This thesis explores the rural-urban adaptation experiences of residents in Nuku’alofa and Hihifo, Tongatapu, to water scarcity in the context of drought and climate change. It also seeks to investigate the role of vulnerability in the provision of aid, in reference to the PACC (Pacific Adaptation to Climate Change) water project in Hihifo. In utilising discourse analysis and analysis of semi-structured interviews and focus groups consisting of participants from Nuku’alofa and Hihifo, a range of themes emerged on the complexities of vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in Tonga. Hence, I sought to identify the ways that people can adapt to water scarcity in the context of drought and climate change. I draw from post structuralism, cultural geography and the vulnerability theory to uncover the discourses present in the climate change literature. It was also important to incorporate literature on sustainability and indigenous knowledge as they support better adaptation capacity in not only Tongatapu but also all of Tonga’s water sector. In particular, I examine vulnerability from a local point of view versus the views of those at the national level. In doing so, local knowledges can help shape decisions on policies regarding water and climate change. Government documents on climate change in Tonga has progressed from a vulnerability point of view to a resilience and adaptation frame of thinking. However, adaptation in the water sector is not solely a problem based on natural variability and climate change. A huge part of water problems is largely rooted on political and economic processes. This underpins the accessibility of people to water resources. This problem needs to be addressed, in order to increase the adaptive capacity of people in the rural-urban areas of Tongatapu.

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  • Investigating influences of incentives on implicit attitudes toward body size

    Taylor, Tokiko (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) was designed to detect relational responding that cannot easily be accessed via traditional survey methods. The IRAP requires participants to meet speed and accuracy criteria during practice trials before proceeding to test trials, which has resulted in an attrition rate of approximately 20%, on average, in the existing research. Variables affecting the attrition rate have not been systematically investigated. I examined the influence of incentives (in this case a $20 voucher contingent on meeting performance criteria) on attrition rate and other IRAP performance measures. In addition, I examined whether the IRAP would reveal an implicit anti-fat bias in 82 university students. I found significant differences in the performance of the incentive group compared to the control group in their response accuracy and measurement of their implicit bias. The results indicated higher levels of bias compared with those from previous research studies, particularly in the incentive group. I did not find statistically significant differences in the attrition rate but found a low attrition rate in both groups. This study reveals the utility of incentives for improving performance on the IRAP, a procedure that demands accurate responses under time pressure for assessing spontaneous relational responding.

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  • Emotional Well-Being and Secondary Traumatic Stress In New Zealand Youth Workers

    Takhar-Stapleton, Amber (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This study aimed to explore the relationship of STS and emotional well-being among New Zealand youth workers using a qualitative approach. Eleven participants were interviewed for the study using a semistructured interviewing technique. The purpose of this study was to fill a gap in the literature about the impact of working with traumatised youth and to identify if youth workers were at risk and vulnerable to the effects of trauma exposure. Three aims were incorporated in the study to answer the research question. The first aim was to explore ways in which youth work may be associated with decreased emotional well-being and STS with the second aim of identifying symptoms and causes of decreased emotional well-being and STS. Lastly, the third aim was to explore how decreased emotional well-being is associated with the development of STS. The findings suggest the majority of participants experienced moderate levels of decreased emotional well-being and displayed symptoms associated with the effects of secondary traumatic stress. The results confirmed the first aim of the study which identified youth work as being correlated with decreased emotional well-being and STS. The results suggested decreased emotional well-being increased vulnerability to developing STS and therefore, the third aim of the study was also confirmed. Several themes were found in the participants’ answers which revealed youth work is associated with emotional well-being and symptoms of STS. This included emotional detachment, suppression, and numbing, helplessness, burnout and lack of resources to cope, social withdrawal, difficulty sleeping and changes in appetite. Risk factors which appeared to increase vulnerability included personal trauma, PTSD, countertransference, and empathic engagement. Organisational stressors were also identified as increasing vulnerability which heavily influenced participants and contributed to extreme stress and exhaustion. Findings in this study contribute to the knowledge of secondary traumatic stress as well as increasing knowledge about the emotional effects of working with traumatised individuals. Furthermore, the study iii helps to educate helping professionals and increases knowledge of youth work.

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  • Deliver Us From Evil: Morality's Ability to Divide and Conquer

    Weinberg, Elizabeth (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    At one point there was consensus that morality was solely based on matters of harm and justice. However, with advances in cultural and anthropological research, Haidt and Joseph (2004) proposed a more expansive approach to morality, known as the Moral Foundations Theory. This theory highlights five foundations: Harm/Care and Fairness/Equality (Individualizing foundations) and Ingroup/Loyalty, Authority/Respect, and Purity/Sanctity (Binding foundations). Established links between the five foundations and political ideologies have been made, as well as broad links with religious affiliation in a US context. Considerably less research has been conducted on these foundations outside of an American context. Due to New Zealand’s particular ethnic composition, multi-party electoral politics and electoral system, and relatively secular climate, it makes for an ideal setting to investigate moral foundations in the context of political and religious ideology. I sampled 354 New Zealand participants (a mixture of general population and students: 39.5% male, 57.1% females, 3.4% other) on moral foundations, political self-identification, religious ideology, and individual-level individualism and collectivism. Political identification and religious ideologies were correlated with morality as predicted, with more conservative political and religious ideology being associated more strongly with the Binding foundations and more liberal political ideology being associated more strongly with the Individualizing. Furthermore, results raise speculation that the vertical dimension of individual-level cultural affiliation may be a strong predictor of morality endorsement alongside collectivism. This study replicates the connection between political and religious ideology, and morality but also adds additional insight into these relationships.

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  • Sense of Home

    Atkins, Emelia (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Quality atmospheric conditions and the ability to empower residents has been overlooked in recent social housing developments as they have been strongly economically focused. The demand for inner city social housing within New Zealand has been a pressing issue since the first worker’s dwellings were built in Petone. Social housing residents are known for their comparatively low incomes and high needs, but this should not mean that they have to dwell in a different standard of housing from other income earners. Social housing is a reality for a growing portion of our society in New Zealand; the location and quality of housing should not be defined by social stigma and hierarchy. Architecture as a discipline has unique potential to critique existing social housing standards and create diversity of atmosphere that evoke a sense of empowerment amongst residents. This research explores the manipulation of hybrid prefabrication systems, with the aim of empowering social housing residents through diverse atmospheric conditions.

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  • Bridging Barriers: Study of Refugee Integration in New Zealand Communities

    Saini, Gaganpreet (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    New Zealand is one of the 26 nations of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) who participate in a regular refugee resettlement program (“New Zealand Refugee Quota Programme”). It is also one of the few countries to have a refugee orientation program upon arrival and dedicates a centre especially to host the incoming refugees. The current refugee quota system in New Zealand provides a 6 week orientation and assessment period followed by dispersal into 6 different cities across New Zealand for permanent resettlement. Refugees develop friendships and a sense of comfort over the 6 weeks program with all the facilities available at the Resettlement centre. The transition from the centre into the independent housing in suburban locations therefore becomes more challenging due to the lack of induction of refugees into their host communities. Refugees are alienated in their new communities with the locals equally as oblivious to the new settlers. As a result, post settlement engagement with the host society becomes difficult for refugees. The community relations between the refugees and host society is neglected with refugees generally connecting with the same ethnic group (ii, Gray); limiting cross-cultural connections. This research investigates the role of architecture as a facilitator of social interaction between the refugees and local community to create a strong sense of belonging in the host society. The aim is to explore architectural solutions which can ease the process of resettlement for refugees into the different regions around New Zealand. It seeks to develop a design which offers social engagement that can extend into the society and cross-cultural interaction can be encouraged.

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  • The Choreomusical Page-to-Stage Approach: Visual Representations of Musical Modernism Through the Works of Igor Stravinsky and George Balanchine

    Hughes, Eustacia Lynn Jocea (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The musical developments of the Modernist period provided a new understanding and approach to composition. These developments are also seen in ballet, branching into several styles, with many choreographers providing their unique take to staging musical works. In this study, the modernist choreomusical relationship is examined with respect to the possibility of a page-to-stage approach in dance. This thesis examines how this approach is manifested in the complex relationships between the composer, and the choreographer. Drawing on nine examples of modernist era ballets categorised in to three styles (classical, neoclassical, and contemporary ballets), discussion of historical context, analysis of the musical and choreographic relationship, and other ideas surrounding adapting music for a visual medium are explored. This thesis also examines changing attitudes to music/dance relationships. Two lines of enquiry are followed, the first assesses, through the example of Stravinsky, Balanchine, and several other contemporaries, whether a page-to-stage approach exists for ballet. A supplementary enquiry explores how such an approach is manifested within different methods of choreography. This study finds that there are difficulties in applying the choreomusical page-to-stage approach to analysing changing attitudes to music/dance relationships. At another level, this study points to the benefit of incorporating the concept of diegesis in analysing the changing attitudes to music/dance relationships.

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  • 'It's hard to ask': Examining the factors influencing decision-making amongst end-stage renal disease patients considering asking friends and family for a kidney

    Jones, Merryn Anne (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Background: Organ donation is an important facet of healthcare delivery in New Zealand, with donation often leading to an increased quality of life for recipients, and a reduction in healthcare costs for the community. People who require new organs have limited options in regards to organ access: they can receive organs from deceased donors, or if a kidney is not volunteered, they might ask someone to donate. For those that choose to ask someone to donate an organ, one barrier that is sometimes voiced is that it is hard to ask family and friends to donate. This project sought to explore the issues surrounding asking for an organ by end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, in order to gain a better understanding of the decision-making process and motivations of patients as they choose or decline to approach others for a kidney. Methods: Participants were recruited from patients with ESRD through the Hawke’s Bay District Health Board. Potential participants were identified as being on the deceased donor list (DDL), or had family or friends being worked up for living kidney donation (LKD). Participants were interviewed and asked about the challenges of asking for a kidney, including such questions as: Who did they ask, and why? Who did they exclude, and why? How did they approach the request, and what were their reasons for asking in this way? Could they identify additional strategies which might have been useful to them, but were either not considered or unavailable? A qualitative descriptive approach was utilised to analyse interview data. Results: Fifteen participants were interviewed, with most stating that it was hard to ask for a kidney and almost half having never approached anyone for a kidney. For many patients, being expected to recruit donors for LKD was a barrier in itself. Commonly identified themes indicate that recipients may be concerned for the health and wellbeing of their loved ones, or have limited recruitment opportunities, or poor health literacy or self-efficacy. Many Maori recipients stated they favoured a whanau approach to discussing transplant, and most recipients desired more support in order to facilitate approaching donors. Conclusions: Findings suggest it would be useful to develop a screening tool assessing willingness and motivation to accept a living kidney donation along with self-efficacy, communication and health literacy levels prior to recipients initiating conversations with potential donors, in order to provide tailored support to the recipient with their initial approach. Additionally, psycho-social support could be offered to all recipients to help identify unmet needs or further barriers such as reciprocity or relationship concerns. Finally, closer communication between health professionals who provide care for the recipient, as well as positive media stories and campaigns that raise awareness of the need to transplant may create opportunities for LKD to be discussed within the recipient’s social network.

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  • Pleistocene cyclostratigraphy on the continental rise and abyssal plain of the western Ross Sea, Antarctica.

    Al'bot, Olga (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis investigates glacimarine sedimentation processes operating on the continental margin of the western Ross Sea during the Pleistocene (˜2.5 Ma). This time period is characterised by a major global cooling step at ˜0.8 Ma, although several proposed episodes of major marine-based Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) retreat in warm interglacial periods are inferred to have occurred after this time. Constraining the timing and magnitude of past marine-based AIS retreat events in the Ross Sea through this time will improve our understanding of the forcing mechanisms and thresholds that drive marine-based ice sheet retreat. Identifying such mechanisms and thresholds is crucial for assisting predictive models of potential ice sheet collapse in a future world with rapidly rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO₂) concentrations. Six sedimentary cores forming a north-to-south transect from the continental rise to the abyssal plain of the western Ross Sea were examined in order to identify potential sedimentary signatures of past marine-based ice sheet variability and associated oceanographic change. A lithofacies scheme and stratigraphic framework were developed, which allowed the identification of shifting sedimentary processes through time. The sediments are interpreted to have been deposited primarily under the influence of bottom currents, most likely from changing rates of dense Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) formation over glacial-interglacial cycles. Two dominant lithofacies (laminated and bioturbated) are recognised in the Pleistocene contourite sequences. Laminated facies alongside reduced ice-rafted debris (IRD) fluxes and reduced biological productivity are interpreted to represent expanded ice sheet and sea ice margins during glacial conditions, which acted to restrict surface water ventilation resulting in less oxygenated bottom waters. Conversely, laminated facies alongside reduced IRD fluxes and increased productivity are inferred to represent a reduction of ice shelf and sea ice cover resulting in enhanced AABW formation and sediment delivery. In general, it is interpreted that bioturbated facies in combination with enhanced productivity are common during interglacial conditions, with peaks in IRD associated with ice sheet retreat events leading into interglacial conditions. However, the relationships between laminated and bioturbated facies vary between sites, and facies at most sites generally alternate on timescales exceeding that of individual glacial-interglacial cycles (2 mm in x-ray images, the sieved weight percentage of the medium-to-coarse sand fraction (250 µm-2 mm), and volumetric estimates of the > 125 µm sand fraction using a laser particle sizer. The x-ray and sieve methods produced comparable results, while the volumetric estimate, although showing comparable long-term trends, produces a lesser correlation to the other two methods. Spectral analysis of the IRD content and the magnetic susceptibility data series reveals that during the Early Pleistocene (2.5-1.2 Ma) ice discharge into the western Ross Sea was paced by the 41 kyr and 100 kyr cycles of obliquity and eccentricity, respectively. The Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT;1.2-0.8 Ma) was characterised by a switch to a higher-frequency, lower-amplitude IRD flux during a long-term period of high power in eccentricity, obliquity and precession (˜23 kyr) observed in the orbital solutions, suggesting a relatively linear response to orbital forcing at this time. The colder climate state of the Late Pleistocene (0.8-0.01 Ma) is characterised by IRD fluctuations modulated primarily by the 100 kyr eccentricity forcing that became dominant by 400 ka. In the western Ross Sea, IRD fluxes show a clear response to the orbital pacing of glacial-interglacial cycles, but are equivocal in identifying the magnitude of ice sheet loss or growth through glacial-interglacial cycles.

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  • Toward the Synthesis of (–)-TAN-2483B Lactam Analogues

    Stirrat, Hedley (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Natural products continue to be an abundant source of lead compounds for drug discovery and development. (–)-TAN-2483A and (–)-TAN-2483B, isolated from the culture of a filamentous fungus, incorporate an unusual furo[3,4-b]pyran-5-one scaffold. TAN-2483A was initially reported to inhibit the c-Src tyrosine kinase enzyme, a potential anticancer target, and parathyroid hormone-induced bone resorption. TAN-2483B, on the other hand, was not isolated in sufficient quantities for biological testing. The synthesis of TAN-2483B is therefore desirable from a drug discovery perspective. Several analogues of TAN-2483B that are functionalised at the propenyl sidechain have previously been synthesised in the Harvey group and have shown promising biological activity. For example, the (Z)-ethyl ester analogue showed micromolar inhibition of HL-60 cells and Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, a protein involved in B-cell maturation that is implicated in certain cancers. The lactone moiety of TAN-2483B and its sidechain analogues, however, appears to be unstable to nucleophilic attack. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the viability of a synthetic route toward lactam analogues of TAN-2483B. It was proposed that substituting the lactone for a lactam would increase the stability of the compound in nucleophilic media. Moreover, the lactam nitrogen may provide a site for further functionalisation of the compound for future structure-activity relationship studies. Because installation of the (Z)-ethyl ester sidechain via Wittig conditions has previously been found to be more facile than installation of the (E)-propenyl sidechain found in the natural product, investigations into forming the lactam ring system were carried out on the ethyl ester advanced intermediates. Reductive amination of a ketone intermediate was envisaged to install the amine prior to a palladium-catalysed carbonylation/lactam formation step. The promising bioactivity of the (Z)-ethyl ester analogue was anticipated to be retained in the target lactam analogues. It was found that the substrates of the proposed reductive amination, the advanced ketone intermediates, were incompatible with the tested conditions, presumably due to base sensitivity. Three by-products from the reductive amination experiments were isolated and tentatively characterised by NMR spectroscopy and HRMS. An alternative route toward lactam analogues of TAN-2483B, via intermediate amines accessed by the substitution of an activated alcohol, was briefly investigated with encouraging results. Further optimisation of the synthetic route toward analogues of TAN-2483B was also achieved. Removal of a purification step enabled the more expedient two-step synthesis of a diol intermediate. The two-step transformation to (Z)- and (E)-ethyl ester intermediates, via sodium periodate-mediated diol cleavage and Wittig olefination, proceeded in the highest yield obtained to date. Investigations into the desilylation of a trimethylsilyl-protected acetylene were also conducted. Although lactam analogues of TAN-2483B were not obtained in this study, progress was made toward their synthesis. The alternative route toward amines that was briefly explored here appears promising, and work is ongoing in the Harvey group to access lactam (and other) analogues of TAN-2483B, in addition to the natural product itself.

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  • Drama Drones: An Investigation Into Integrating Drones Into Real World Filmmaking in New Zealand

    Cleveland, Peter

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The use of drone technology is a topical issue for contemporary filmmaking. The fast paced innovation of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) or drones has opened up a new realm of camera movement available to all levels of filmmakers, including the novice. This expedient growth fuelled by amateur open source development has outstripped the ability of many governments to legislate. The film industry itself has been equally slow in reacting to these new possibilities. This has resulted in advancing technologies being underutilised and has limited uptake of drone technology within dramatic film production. This research engages with these issues and explores the use of drones as a motion controlled cinematographic tool, specifically as it relates to the practice of filmmaking in New Zealand at both a novice and a professional level. A practice based methodology serves as a platform to demonstrate how to utilise advancing technologies in an original way that is consistent with the current mode of filmmaking. The outcome is evidenced by an innovative blend of open source ground control software, autopilot firmware, DIY1 crafted drone and early adoption of Real Time Kinematic GPS2 hardware. Can an innovative approach to the use of emerging creative technologies influence the way in which they are integrated into the New Zealand on-set filmmaking idiom by using drone technology to develop a proof of concept system for predictable and repeatable camera path?

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  • Gaining insights into public transport passenger satisfaction using crowdsourced information

    Douglas-Clifford, Andrew George (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • In situ ground evaluation by deep soil mixing

    Foy, Hamish Michael (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Between 2010 and 2011, Canterbury experienced a series of four large earthquake events with associated aftershocks which caused widespread damage to residential and commercial infrastructure. Fine grained and uncompacted alluvial soils, typical to the Canterbury outwash plains, were exposed to high peak ground acceleration (PGA) during these events. This rapid increase in PGA induced cyclic strain softening and liquefaction in the saturated, near surface alluvial soils. Extensive research into understanding the response of soils in Canterbury to dynamic loading has since occurred. The Earthquake Commission (EQC), the Ministry of Business and Employment (MBIE), and the Christchurch City Council (CCC) have quantified the potential hazards associated with future seismic events. Theses bodies have tested numerous ground improvement design methods, and subsequently are at the forefront of the Canterbury recovery and rebuild process. Deep Soil Mixing (DSM) has been proven as a viable ground improvement foundation method used to enhance in situ soils by increasing stiffness and positively altering in situ soil characteristics. However, current industry practice for confirming the effectiveness of the DSM method involves specific laboratory and absolute soil test methods associated with the mixed column element itself. Currently, the response of the soil around the columns to DSM installation is poorly understood. This research aims to understand and quantify the effects of DSM columns on near surface alluvial soils between the DSM columns though the implementation of standardised empirical soil test methods. These soil strength properties and ground improvement changes have been investigated using shear wave velocity (Vs), soil behaviour and density response methods. The results of the three different empirical tests indicated a consistent improvement within the ground around the DSM columns in sandier soils. By contrast, cohesive silty soils portrayed less of a consistent response to DSM, although still recorded increases. Generally, within the tests completed 50 mm from the column edge, the soil response indicated a deterioration to DSM. This is likely to be a result of the destruction of the soil fabric as the stress and strain of DSM is applied to the un‐mixed in situ soils. The results suggest that during the installation of DSM columns, a positive ground effect occurs in a similar way to other methods of ground improvement. However, further research, including additional testing following this empirical method, laboratory testing and finite 2D and 3D modelling, would be useful to quantify, in detail, how in situ soils respond and how practitioners should consider these test results in their designs. This thesis begins to evaluate how alluvial soils tend to respond to DSM. Conducting more testing on the research site, on other sites in Christchurch, and around the world, would provide a more complete data set to confirm the results of this research and enable further evaluation. Completing this additional research could help geotechnical DSM practitioners to use standardised empirical test methods to measure and confirm ground improvement rather than using existing test methods in future DSM projects. Further, demonstrating the effectiveness of empirical test methods in a DSM context is likely to enable more cost effective and efficient testing of DSM columns in future geotechnical projects.

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  • Trash or Treasure? Te Papa and the collecting on everyday material culture

    Hackett, Amy (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The everyday, ordinary, and mundane are categories of material culture that challenge traditional museum collecting. Collection planning is an absolute necessity for museums if they are to avoid becoming unmanageable time capsules. With cuts to resources and space now at a premium, it is important that museums clarify their purpose and begin to collect more strategically. This dissertation asks: if collecting everyday material culture is now an accepted part of curatorial practice today, then how does Te Papa approach this fraught task? How does the museum define the everyday, how much of it already exists in the museum’s collections, and what tools and strategies does it deploy to ensure that these objects are collected and appreciated as part of the nation’s history and heritage? Using a multi-method approach comprising document analysis, interviews and observation, this dissertation provides insight into how Te Papa collects everyday material culture. It provides an in-depth view of the national museum’s current collecting processes, all the way from how it collects on paper, to how it collects in reality. The research addresses gaps in literature on institutional collecting, particularly in a national museum setting. Building on work by James B Gardner and Simon Knell, and by observing and interviewing curators, this study is able to respond to calls for research that approaches collecting from an internal ‘on-the-ground’ viewpoint. Trash or Treasure? reveals that at Te Papa, although everyday material culture is being collected and displayed, it exists at a crossroads of traditional and contemporary conceptions of collecting. Policy enables collecting of these everyday objects provided acquisition proposals demonstrate national significance. However, curators are less concerned with this aspect of an object. This discrepancy occurs because of the challenging nature of everyday material culture, namely its mutability; it can be all things to many people. The findings suggest that policy does not always trump practice unless strict approval processes are put in place. In order to build a strong collection, this dissertation argues that museums need to find a balance between careful planning while also allowing space for unexpected collecting opportunities.

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  • Seeing Things Differently: The use of mobile app interpretation and its effect on visitor experience at two heritage sites in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Aitken, Jessica (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The practice of contemporary heritage interpretation has seen increased investment in digital technologies and more recently in mobile applications. However, few empirical studies assess how effective mobile apps are to the visitor experience of heritage sites. What kind of visitor experience do mobile apps provide? How do mobile apps deliver on the aims of interpretation for heritage sites? What types of apps work best? What are the challenges for developers and heritage professionals? A qualitative research approach is used to examine two case studies; High Street Stories: the life and times of Christchurch’s High Street Precinct and IPENZ Engineering Tours: Wellington Heritage Walking Tour. These case studies ask what kind of experience mobile apps offer as an interpretation tool at these heritage sites. To investigate the topic, email interviews were carried out with heritage professionals and digital developers; together with qualitative interviews with visitors recruited to visit the case study sites using the mobile applications. This study explores two current examples of mobile app technology in the heritage sector in a New Zealand context. The results of this study aim to augment current literature on the topic of digital interpretation. This study seeks to offer heritage managers and interpreters some key factors to consider when making decisions regarding the methods used to present and interpret heritage sites to visitors and in developing new interpretation and digital strategies that include mobile applications. Although each scenario presents its particular set of considerations and all heritage sites are different, it is hoped these recommendations can be applied and offer working models and strategies.

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  • The End of the Sea Wall

    McStay, Shannon (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    With climate change becoming more widely understood, we are beginning to see how this phenomenon is impacting on our ability to live coastally. Coastal properties represent some of the most expensive real estate in the country, however these properties are being battered by increasing storm surges causing coastal erosion and decay to the land on which they sit. This is resulting in people fighting to keep their homes out of the water, along with an increasing need for a solution to keep the water out of their homes. In Raumati, sea walls began appearing in the 1950s with people blocking their individual properties from the ocean with wooden log walls. These walls have continued to get larger, higher and more solid until they have become the rock accumulation, stone path and concrete walls that stand today along almost the entire length of the Kapiti Coast. The impact of such walls is that, while they protect the land immediately behind them, they cause greater issues further down the coast, causing sections of the coastline to deteriorate at a far more accelerated rate. The aim of this project will be to put an end to the Kapiti sea wall by addressing the site at the southern end of Raumati where this erosion is becoming increasingly evident. Here, the delicate sand dunes are being eaten away by heightened storm surges and an ever-increasing sea level. Rather than looking at it as a negative effect, this thesis will explore the opportunities that are opened by this decay. The project proposes the reinstating and re-wetting of the once drained wetlands that lie behind the natural dunes. Above these wetlands, a ranger’s hut will act as a home, embassy and church within Queen Elizabeth Park. This allows for a greater sense of custodianship, with more people coming, going and staying within the park. The project outcome will be a building that combines public and private spaces. It will allow for the fluctuation in sea levels to interact with and become a part of the building, rather than being excluded through traditional approaches to dealing with climate change on coastlines. Hence, this ranger’s hut will put an end to the sea wall.

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