111 results for Post-doctoral

  • The Artistry of Construction: An investigation into construction as a creative process and the influence of mobile phones within domestic scale construction projects

    McMeel, Dermott (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This Thesis seeks to analyse the influence that mobile phones exert on existing communication and working practices, and on the relationships of participants involved during on-site construction. The complexity of contemporary construction makes it difficult to plot static causal relationships between communications and actions on site, not easily addressed by a managerial framework that often misses the subtleties of the construction process. The aim of this Thesis is to increase our understanding of construction as a creative process and the operational influences of mobile phones during on-site construction. I examine the subtleties of mobile phone usage through three studies, and bring evidence to bear on the problematic of communication in construction. The first study analyses the construction of an art installation, positioning construction as a creative process. This description will inform the second and third studies, which examine the perception and usage of mobile phones within construction respectively. The narrative of this Thesis operates simultaneously along several different levels, pointing to the interconnection between creative, technological and collaborative factors that shape contemporary construction. I advance and interrogate an alternative description of construction based on the proposition that construction is a creative process and more sensitive to the communication practices within it than is often assumed. How are mobile phones specifically, and communication technology in general, manifested in construction? Beyond the functional considerations of communication as linear channels and construction as a linear process I identify a complexity within communication that challenges established assumptions of linearity evident in much of the construction management literature, both within the construction process and within the communication technologies that it deploys. This research counters the dominant causal description of the construction process and communication within it as fixed channels for the transfer of information. Within this description the mobile phone is revealed not as a static component in a fixed place within the process of construction but as a device best conceived as a medium for tweaking, tuning and calibrating onsite processes. The mobile phone complements, supplements and challenges other communications media and procedures in the construction process. My analysis provides a description of communication technology and mobile phones within construction that asserts its fluidity, enabling a broader description of construction to facilitate further interrogation of its communication procedures and media. Much research into the process of construction is dominated by a scientific management framework, asserting the fixed causal relationships between people. The process of building construction falls within the sciences. This Thesis challenges the exclusively scientific framing of construction and argues that there remains an underlying artistry to the process of construction, commonly theorised by philosophers in terms of “techné” and the craft inherent in the process of making. By this I mean that construction is influenced by the technological sophistication of the context in which it is being carried out. From the clay brick construction of Sub- Saharan Africa to the Millennium Bridge in London, these are a product of both communications and constructional technologies. While there exists significant vi research addressing the operation of design activities under the influence of communication technologies, there is a significant gap in the research analysing their influence on working practices during construction. It is within this context that I investigate the influence of mobile phones during on-site activities.

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  • Implementations in relation to sustainable development in industry and industrial design profession: a case of Arcelik corporation

    Gaziulusoy, I (2011-10-07)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    M.Sc. study deals with implementation of sustainable development in industry and industrial design profession specific to the case of Arçelik Corporation. The study, states the historical background of sustainable development and mentions existing challenges in relation to implementation briefly, in order to set the conceptual frame. After setting the conceptual frame, the study scrutinizes how industry and industrial design profession take action with respect to sustainable development; the drives and methods are investigated. The action taken and attitude adopted by industry in relation to sustainable development is important since, industry constitutes the economical basis of development and since, it is directly related with sustainable use of resources by determining production-consumption cycle. On the other hand, industrial design profession is an important agent not only for the provision of sustainability in industry as contributing in product development process, but also for society by the ability of influencing the cultural transformation necessary for sustainable development. The case study carried out about Arçelik Corporation, revealed that the Corporation does not involve issues related with sustainable development in its vision. In addition, the environmental policy of Arçelik is driven solely by European Union’s legislative requirements as a consequence of Arçelik’s present trade relationships. Therefore Arçelik’s environmental vision is insufficient with regard to sustainable development. Nevertheless, the employees of Arçelik seems as being internalised this existing environmental vision. Yet, the employees taking part in product development and manufacture processes are almost illiterate about sustainable development and design approaches related with sustainability and environmental protection, and their knowledge about environmental effects of products is insufficient.

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  • Living life in residential aged care: a process of continuous adjustment

    McKenzie-Green, BA (2011-11-17)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Aim The aim of this study was to examine whether, and how, residents living in residential aged care homes (RACH)1 become involved in their care, and what areas of their care and life they work to influence or negotiate. Scope This grounded theory study, conducted in two Australian RACHs, comprised 24 days of participant observation and interviews with 22 residents and 19 staff members. Data collection and analysis were concurrent, with theoretical sampling guiding the ongoing data collection. The findings revealed a complex set of perspectives, interactions and processes which explain how residents work to live their life in residential aged care (RAC). Findings Findings reveal three dimensions of living in RAC: presenting an acceptable self, living a communal life and preserving the self. Three salient conditions can influence these dimensions of living in RAC. These conditions have been named situational change, shaping expectations and environmental shaping. Presenting an acceptable self involves activities conceptualised as getting to know, building an information framework and deciding how to be. In these ways, residents learn what is or is not acceptable and to whom. The second dimension of living in RAC, living a communal life, includes residents’ efforts to become known by establishing an identity and connecting and contributing to the community. In this dimension, residents both confer and gain reputations. Preserving the self includes maintaining a private self, managing their own health, accepting help and maintaining independence while at the same time maintaining a private self. Depending on the resident‘s situation (situational change),at a particular time, one or more of these dimensions may be backgrounder or fore grounded. Loss of family or friends, changes in health conditions or a perception that their values are threatened may lead the resident to focus their efforts on preserving the self (foregrounding) while presenting an acceptable self and living a communal life are of less importance and are back grounded. When a resident is foregrounding living a communal life, they may background preserving the self and make every effort to be present at community activities. At these times residents may ―act as if‖; they will present as though they are well when they are not. Additionally, residents‘lives can be shaped through interaction with staff. Shaping expectations can influence residents‘efforts to have their expectations met. Residents use a range of strategies to have an expectation or need met. These strategies include becoming someone problematic when the staff and residents‘ perception of the need are mismatched; bypassing staff in favour of approaching a staff member who is perceived to be more amenable to the resident‘s request, and calling in a proxy to act on residents‘ behalf. Staffs also employ a range of strategies which influence residents‘expectations. These strategies have been conceptualised as gap filling where the resident has expressed an aspect of their life as missing; boundary setting when the staff perceive residents are presenting an unacceptable self and boundary breaking and collusion when a staff member perceives an unjust boundary. Additionally, when residents are experiencing distress, staff may work to assist the resident to work through their distress. This aspect of staff work has been conceptualised as working with tunnel experiences. Environmental shaping (physical and structural) provides a third condition which influences how residents live their lives. The influence of the facilities physical layout has been conceptualised as connecting in congregate places. Additionally, while the residents may or may not be aware of some dimensions of the structural influences on their life, the facility culture, government legislation and staffing levels and funding have an impact on how the residents live their lives. As physical and structural environments are relatively inflexible, this aspect of residential living is xigenerally less responsive to residents‘efforts, requiring a high level of flexibility from residents. The three processes, presenting an acceptable self, living a communal life and preserving the self, together with the conditions which shape them, (situational change, shaping expectations and environmental shaping), demonstrate that residents are in a process of continuous adjustment. This study adds to the body of knowledge in that it explains the effort that residents put into living in RAC and could serve to assist staff, management and policy makers to examine the ways in which residents are supported to live their lives as effectively as possible.

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  • Geology of the Dusky Sound area, Fiordland, with emphasis on the structural-metamorphic development of some porphyroblastic staurolite pelites.

    Ward, Christopher Mark (1984)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Digital copy stored under Section 55 of the NZ Copyright Act.

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  • Plutonic and metamorphic rocks in the Victoria range segment of the Karamea batholith, Southwest Nelson, New Zealand.

    Tulloch, Andrew James (1979)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Digital copy stored under Section 55 of the NZ Copyright Act.

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  • The meat purchase decision : An experimental study

    Hamlin, Robert P (1997)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: x, 423 leaves : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Marketing. "December 1997." Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Gel electrophoretic studies on the chromosome of bacteriophage T5

    Hayward, Gary Selwyn (1972)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xvi, 137 leaves : illus. ; 28 cm. Notes: University of Otago department : Biochemistry. Thesis (Ph.D. in Biochemistry) - University of Otago. Bibliography: p.127-137.

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  • The natural history of autoimmune disorders in mice and its modification by therapy

    Casey, Thomas Patrick (1964)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    3 volumes; illustrations; diagrams. Thesis (M.D.) - University of Otago.

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  • Annibale Stabile, a man of no little repute among the masters of music : the sacred music

    Lightbourne, Ruth E (1994)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: 2 v. : ill., facsims., music ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Music. Vol. 2 contains an edition of Stabile's sacred music in transcription. The score has Latin words, and text in Latin with English translations. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • A tectonic synthesis of the Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt

    Jugum, Dushan (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt (DMOB) is an Early-Permian ophiolite sequence exposed in the South Island of New Zealand. The ophiolite is overlain by the thick deep-marine sedimentary Maitai Group. The Alpine Fault divides the DMOB into two sections, one in Nelson and the other in Southland. The DMOB is divided into three different units based on lithology and geochemistry: the Livingstone Ophiolite, which is a typical ophiolite sequence dipping sub-vertically and facing west; the Otama Mélange, a deformed ocean-floor assemblage with no ultramafics or serpentinites and a greater amount of felsic rocks than the other two units; and the Patuki Mélange, a highly deformed ophiolite structurally beneath the Livingstone Ophiolite. The Lvingstone Ophiolite has three phases of igneous activity. The first phase is represented by cumulates, massive gabbro, and extensive pillow lavas. It has a MORB-like geochemistry with a subtle above-subduction signature. The age of this phase is 277.6 ± 3.3 Ma using U/Pb in zircon. The second phase locally intrudes the first with dykes which are feeders for extensive non-pillowed lava flows of variable thickness. The age of the second phase (275.2 ± 5.4 Ma) cannot be distinguished from the first. The second phase has a stronger above-subduction geochemical signature than the first phase. The third phase comprises felsic and intermediate dykes that cut the first two phases and intrude into the sediments overlying the DMOB. This phase has not been directly dated but has the same geochemistry as the felsic rocks in the Otama Mélange. The igneous rocks of the Otama Mélange are 50% felsic and have an age of 269.3 ± 4.5 Ma. The mafic and felsic rocks from the Otama Mélange have a strong above-subduction geochemistry, but are not typical of arcs. The Patuki Mélange contains both MORB-like and OIB igneous rocks in a serpentinite matrix. The MORB-like Patuki Mélange is similar to the first stage of igneous activity in the Livingstone Ophiolite. Sediment blocks within the Patuki Mélange have been correlated with the Maitai Group, based on their petrology and detrital zircon age pattern. These sediments have a youngest detrital zircon age of Late Permian through to the Early Triassic. The Maitai Group sediment are distal in character within the Patuki Mélange and more proximal above the Livingstone Ophiolite. I infer that the Livingstone Ophiolite represents a fore-arc, and the Otama Mélange a localization of the Livingstone ophiolites stage three igneous activity in that fore-arc (possibly due to ridge subduction). The Patuki Mélange is either an off-scraping of a subducted slab or part of the trench wall of the above-subduction crust. The DMOB may have been part of the same ocean-crust as the Brook Street Terrane during its formation, but there is no specific evidence for this. Detrital zircons from the Caples Terrane are almost exclusively Triassic in age. The Maitai Group may have some time overlap with the oldest Murihiku Terrane. The DMOB is identical in geology and age to the Yakuno Ophiolite in Japan which may have once been part of the same subduction-zone before the opening of the Neo-Tethys. Detrital zircons from the Aspiring Terrane have a Jurassic age 154.1 ± 2.0 Ma, which constrains the age of the metamorphism of the Haast Schist. The DMOB has been highly deformed with evidence for extensional structure reactivated in compression on the sea-floor during igneous activity; however, most of the observed internal deformation in the DMOB is Cenozoic in age. The serpentinites are completely overprinted by the oblique compression through New Zealand since the Miocene.

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  • From subject to device, history as myth in action : the evolution of event from mythic processes as revealed in Waterfront Dispute fiction

    Matthewson, Claire C. (1986)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This analysis of selected New Zealand works defends the evolving function of history as fiction-material. It is intended to establish that purpose and treatment alter, as time further separates the writing and the event. The general change is one of development from subject to device properties. In tracing history's evolving role and treatment in fiction, analysis identifies history's eventual source - shown, in fiction, to be mythic and subjectively conceptual.

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  • Geology of the Takitimu group and associated intrusive rocks, central Takitimu Mountains, western Southland, New Zealand

    Houghton, Bruce Frank (1977)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: 2 v. : illus. maps (in pocket) ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Geology. Thesis (Ph.D. in geology) - University of Otago. Includes bibliography.

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  • HIV prevention, treatment, and care in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Crump, Andrew John (2012)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xi, 296 pages : illustrations, map ; 30 cm. Notes: Thesis (M. D.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Remineralisation of decalcified tooth enamel consequent to orthodontic treatment

    Lam, Emily (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xx, 253 leaves : col. ill ; 30 cm. Notes: “A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Orthodontics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand”. "August 2010". University of Otago department: Oral Sciences. Thesis ( D. Clin. Dent. )--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Tourism policy implementation in the Philippines, 1973-2009

    de la Santa, Edieser (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xv, 362 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes :University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Speech style in gendered communication

    Hannah, Annette (1999)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Dr Annette Hannah is a registered Psychologist in New Zealand and invites enquiries regarding this research: ahannahnz@gmail.com This research was further published in the Journal of Language and Social Psychology: Hannah A, & Murachver T. Gender and conversational style as predictors of Conversational behaviour. Vol 18, No2, June 1999, 153-174. Hannah A, & Murachver T. Gender Preferential Responses to Speech. Vol 26, No 3, Sept. 2007 274-290.

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  • Practising Tamariki 'Āngai : Mangaia's informal island adoption

    Dodson, Marsa A (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xv, 410 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Social Work and Community Development. "21 August 2009." Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The Lotu and the Fa'asāmoa: church and society in Samoa, 1830-1880

    Crawford, Ronald James (1977)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xiii, 455 leaves : maps ; 30 cm. Notes: Errata sheet mounted on fly-leaf. Appendices: I. L.M.S. - Wesleyan comity and Rev. P. Turner. -II. Denominational growth and growth of church membership. Bibliography: p.440-454.

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  • The geology of the Greenhills ultramafic complex, Bluff peninsula, Southland, New Zealand

    Mossman, David J (1970)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The Greenhills Ultramafic Complex occupies 5 square miles on the north-west part of Bluff Peninsula. It consists of a deformed layered series of ultrabasic rocks of "early late" Permian age intruded into Lower Permian metasediments of the Southland Syncline. The main penetrative planar structures in the complex are primary layering and cleavage; both are inclined. Mesoscopic folds in primary layering are not uncommon. Widespread slumping in the layered series and the emplacement of the complex as a plug of hot rock bounded by a fault and ringed by a "lubricating" marginal gabbro indicate recurring conditions of instability during evolution of the complex. Emplacement of the Greenhills Complex was accompanied by the intrusion of innumerable dykes and by folding and faulting. Two main generations of dykes are recognized: 1) early ultrabasic dykes (in order of decreasing age: dunite, wehrlite and eucrite) are unchilled and preceded emplacement of the marginal gabbro; 2) late dykes (in general order of decreasing age: eucrite, anorthosite, trondhjemite, hornblende-andesite, dolerite, tremolite-picrite, hornblende-plagioclase pegmatite and aplite) are chilled and postdate the marginal gabbro. Emplacement of the Greenhills Complex effected contact metamorphism of country rock spilitic metasediments of the Greenhills Group. These rocks, dominantly volcanic microbreccia with intercalated bands of impure marble, increase from regional prehnite-pumpellyite facies through greenschist facies as seen at Mokomoko Inlet to hornblende-hornfels adjacent the Greenhills Complex. Fossils including the gastropod Peruvispira aff. imbricata Waterhouse and the bivalve Atomodesma aff. marwicki indicate a late Lower Permian age for the middle part of the Greenhills Group. The coral Plerophyllum aff. timorense Gerth occurs in a lower horizon of the Greenhills Group. Bands of marble containing shell fragments and radiolarians are common in the upper part of the section. The layered series of the Greenhills Ultramafic Complex is stratigraphically divisible into: 1) an upper eucritic portion dominated by a 2000 ft thick Eucrite Zone which includes a 50 ft thick allivalite unit; 2) a lower ultramafic portion comprised essentially of a 500 ft thick Wehrlite Zone (which includes near its base a poikilitic peridotite unit less than 100 ft thick) and a basal Dunite Zone exceeding 2000 ft in thickness. A Transition Zone of feldspathic wehrlite occurs between the upper and lower portions of the complex and with the poikilitic peridotite unit is an important marker horizon. The layered series shows well developed accumulate structures and textures resembling cumulates in classic stratiform intrusions. Cryptic layering is shown by the range in composition of the essential primary minerals. These minerals in order of separation from the Greenhills magma are: olivine (Fo90-65), clinopyroxene (Ca41Mg54Fe5 to Ca44Mg47Fe9) and plagioclase (An92-88). Other primary minerals present in minor quantities include orthopyroxene (avg. En81), brown hornblende and chromite (Mg48) (Cr60Al22). Optical and X-ray studies of the plagioclases suggest a discontinuity in the unit cell geometry between An90.5 and An93.0; this break probably represents the boundary between transitional and primitive anorthite structures. Single crystal X-ray study of augite lamellae exsolved on (100) of orthopyroxene shows that the c and b-crystallographic directions of orthopyroxene host and included lamellae are coincident. The unit cell dimensions of the lamellae as determined after least squares refinement are: aA9.79, bA8.90. cA5.29 all ± 0.04 A, B10°614' ±1', V 442.62 ± 0.5 A3. The Greenhills Ultramafic Complex is adequately explained by crystal settling during fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma. This magma is believed to have had affinities transitional between alkaline and tholeiitic magma types. Differentiation took place in a hydrous open system connected with the surface of the earth.

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  • Geochemical investigations of the alkalic rocks of the Dunedin volcano, East Otago, New Zealand

    Price, Richard C. (1973)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The Dunedin Volcano, of Mid - Late Miocene age, is acomplex alkalic volcano which was active over a period of about 3 m.y. (13-10 m.y.). Activity commenced with the eruption of basaltic flows and tuffs in the central Otago Harbour depression. The earliest tuffs are interbedded with marine sands and calcareous sands indicating that the initial activity was submarine. Pillow structures and 'bomb sags' in the lower units of the volcanic massif are additional evidence that the initial activity was submarine. The initial basaltic activity was followed by extensive emplacement of quartz normative trachyte flows and tuffs in the central area, and a small emergent cone of trachytic composition was built. The formation of the early trachyte cone was followed by extensive, subaerial, shield-building eruptions of flows ranging in composition from basalt through intermediate rock types to phonolite and feldspathoidal trachyte. These were erupted from vents within the central depression, and the last significant activity in the central area resulted in the emplacement of coarse breccias which occupy vents on an axis through Port Chalmers, Portobello and Sandymount. The central activity was followed by a period of eruption controlled largely by activity from non-central fissures probably related to basement fractures. The conspicuous topographic highs of the Otago Peninsula and the Flagstaff-Mihiwaka ridges were built. Activity in the Dunedin Volcano was terminated about 10 m.y. ago with the emplacement of nepheline benmoreite lava domes at Mt.Cargill. The volcano has a complicated history. Activity from various vents (of the order of 40 have been recognized) over a period of 3 million years, during which the volcanics were being actively eroded, has resulted in stratigraphic complexities which are irresolvable on-a regional scale. Correlation of units over distances in excess of a few km are invalid, and the regional stratigraphy established by Benson (MS, 1968) is rejected. Although syn- and post-volcanic faults can be recognized in the Dunedin Volcano, structural complexities are very rarely observed. Relationships between the various volcanic units result from ·the interaction of flows, coulees, and intrusions erupted onto an actively eroding volcanic topography. in the volcano occurs the overburden during intrusion and the underlying sediments in the central depression. Volcanism in East Otago is intimately associated with extensive block faulting. Although the latest movements appear reverse there is strong evidence that faults in East Otago were normal during Cretaceous and, possibly, Early Tertiary time. A number of endogenous lava domes have been identified in the Dunedin Volcano, especially amongst the products of the later phases of the volcano's history. Most are composed of phonolite, but other examples consist of mugearite, hawaiite, benmoreite, trachyandesite, and nepheline benmoreite. Commonly the domes have been emplaced in cinder cones developed on the flanks of the volcano. […] The strontium isotopic chemistry and in particular the REE chemistry of the quartz normative trachytes require that special circumstances be invoked for the origin of these oversaturated melts. Two suggestions are made here. Either the trachytes derive :at the lower crust by partial melting of a quartz free parent, or they represent the end product in a long process of crystal fractionation in an isolated crustal magma chamber. The former model raises problems regarding the nature of the parental material, and the latter requires some form of preferential feldspar contamination to account for the REE pattern and other peculiarities of the chemistry.

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