99 results for Post-doctoral

  • Remineralisation of decalcified tooth enamel consequent to orthodontic treatment

    Lam, Emily (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xx, 253 leaves : col. ill ; 30 cm. Notes: “A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Orthodontics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand”. "August 2010". University of Otago department: Oral Sciences. Thesis ( D. Clin. Dent. )--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The natural history of autoimmune disorders in mice and its modification by therapy

    Casey, Thomas Patrick (1964)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    3 volumes; illustrations; diagrams. Thesis (M.D.) - University of Otago.

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  • Lungworm infection in farmed red deer

    Johnson, Marion Gay (2002)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Lungworm is the most important parasite of farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus) in New Zealand. Because of the morphological similarity between deer-derived and cattle-derived lungworm, it has been assumed that the lungworm infecting red deer is Dictyocaulus viviparus, the lungworm which causes "husk' in cattle. This programme has used light microscopy, electron microscopy, molecular techniques, cross-infection studies and immunisation to re-examine the issue of species identification of lungworm affecting farmed red deer and to study the pathological and immunological responses of deer to experimental challenge with lungworm derived from deer and cattle. Dictyocaulus larvae were isolated from properties on which the host of interest was the sole species grazed. The larvae were cultured and used to infect multiplier animals. Larvae were then cultured from the multiplier animals for use in trials. Examination of adults using light microscopy revealed differences between deer-derived lungworm and cattle-derived lungworm but these were hard to quantify. Using scanning electron microscopy the two could be clearly differentiated, the mouthparts of cattle origin lungworm were circular, those of deer origin lungworm elongate. Molecular analysis of the ITS-2 region confirmed a difference between the two lungworm isolates. The ITS-2 sequence of the lungworm derived from cattle matched that of Dictyocaulus viviparus. The sequence of the ITS-2 of lungworm derived from red deer matched that of D. eckerti, described from fallow deer (Dama dama). Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), a high resolution mutation detection method, provided a technically simple method of differentiating lungworm derived from many hosts, including cattle and red deer. In a cross-infection trial D. viviparus infections established in cattle, whereas deer derived lungworm did not. Red deer developed patent infections whether challenged with deer lungworm or D. viviparus. There were significant differences in the course of the infections, the host responses and the associated pathology. Huskvac, an irradiated larval vaccine available for use in cattle in Europe, was trialled in red deer in New Zealand. A group of cattle were used as a control to ensure the efficacy of the vaccine under local conditions. Huskvac protected cattle against a D. viviparus challenge. Red deer were afforded a degree of protection, in that patency was delayed by several days in vaccinated animals, larval output was lower and fewer adults established in the lungs. Although protection was irrespective of species challenge, some aspects of the host response differed according to the challenge species. The lungworm specific to red deer in New Zealand is not D. viviparus. It is probably D. eckerti, according to the current classification. Cross-infection does however occur and D. viviparus causes pathology in red deer, therefore contamination of pastures by grazing cattle is not recommended. As vaccination with Huskvac provided a degree of protection in red deer it is possible that vaccination using irradiated D. eckerti larvae may be more effective.

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  • The gift of the other: Levinas, Derrida, and a theology of hospitality

    Shepherd, Andrew Philip (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Despite the celebration of 'difference' and the rhetoric of 'connectedness', the so-called 'global village' of the early twenty-first century is far from a peaceful and harmonious reality. Powerful ideological discourses such as the market and the political 'war on terror' shape a world in which many, classified as Others, are excluded. Conceived of as abstract commodities competing for limited resources, or worse, as potential 'terrorists' coming to 'destroy civilization', Others are seen as threats. In this world of exclusion and hostility the Christian church is summoned to continue to witness to the good news of God's gracious hospitality. The practice of 'hospitality' -what Christine Pohl refers to as 'an essential part of Christian identity' - is, however, rendered problematic due to the emasculation and distortion of the term by the prevailing ideologies of our time. To engage in this historical and life-giving practice faithfully therefore requires a theological rehabilitation of the concept of 'hospitality'. This thesis undertakes this rehabilitative task in two ways. Firstly, the work engages with the work of prominent French philosophers Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida. In contrast to Cartesian western philosophical thought which has given primacy to the cogito, Levinas and Derrida claim that the self is constituted by the call of the Other. Instead of disregard or fear of the Other, their 'philosophies of hospitality' assert that authentic human existence is characterised by an 'infinite responsibility' before the face of the Other. While finding rich resources in Levinasian and Derridean thought, there are weaknesses and limitations in their respective understandings of selfhood, inter-human relationality, eschatology and teleology, and the differential ontology upon which their ethical philosophies are grounded. Therefore, while continuing the dialogue with Levinas and Derrida, section two of this thesis offers an explicitly theological account of 'hospitality'. Whereas Levinasian-Derridean thought implies that tension and hostility are both ontologically intrinsic and insurmountable, the Christian doctrines of Trinity, creation, and sin offer an ontology of primordial communion in which hostility is understood as arising from the failure of humanity to live in communion with others. This hostility is overcome in the 'once for all' death of Jesus. This sacrificial and substitutionary action, far from sacralising violence and turning suffering into a virtue, prevails over human enmity and offers the true form of personhood. Those who through faith accept this 'gift of God' are indwelt by the presence of the Spirit of the resurrected Christ and incorporated into a new form of sociality - the ecclesia. The alienated self, discomforted by the disturbing Other, undergoes a makeover and is transformed into an ecclesial self; expanded to 'make room' for otherness. Fear is replaced by love, and appropriative desire gives way to mutual gift-exchange. Undergoing this gradual transformation, the ecclesia is empowered to participate in God's redemptive purposes being enacted in the world and thus becomes a witness to God's hospitality.

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  • Assessing the impact of human disturbance on penguins

    Ellenberg, Ursula (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xix, 257 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.

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  • HIV prevention, treatment, and care in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Crump, Andrew John (2012)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xi, 296 pages : illustrations, map ; 30 cm. Notes: Thesis (M. D.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Practising Tamariki 'Āngai : Mangaia's informal island adoption

    Dodson, Marsa A (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xv, 410 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Social Work and Community Development. "21 August 2009." Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The Lotu and the Fa'asāmoa: church and society in Samoa, 1830-1880

    Crawford, Ronald James (1977)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xiii, 455 leaves : maps ; 30 cm. Notes: Errata sheet mounted on fly-leaf. Appendices: I. L.M.S. - Wesleyan comity and Rev. P. Turner. -II. Denominational growth and growth of church membership. Bibliography: p.440-454.

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  • The search for 'self' for lifestyle travellers

    Cohen, Scott Allen (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: ix, 186 leaves : maps. ; 30 cm. Notes: "February 27th 2009". University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2009. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The construction of entrepreneurship in publicly-owned utilities in New Zealand: local and translocal discourses, 1999-2001

    Cardow, Andrew G (2005)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This research project examines how managers in local-government-owned business organisations justify their adoption of an entrepreneurial orientation and their interpretation of their role in entrepreneurial terms. To explore these justifications, interviews were conducted with the senior management of four local-government- owned business operations and one local council. They were: Metrowater, The Edge, Taieri Gorge Railway, Chatham Islands Council and Chatham Islands Enterprise Trust. These interviews were then analysed, utilising a critical discourse method. In addition, interviews were also conducted with senior managers in the Rotorua District Council and Taupo District Council who provided a sharp contrast to the former organisations and suggested a means by which the neo-liberal approach within the sector might be countered. Through speaking with the various local government business managers contacted for this project, I concluded that managers of local-government-owned business operations have a strong institutional identification with the private sector. This identity is so strong that many of the managers interviewed have rejected the very notion that they are public employees of any sort. The managers have adopted an entrepreneurial approach because they see this as essential to gain professional legitimacy with their peers in the private sector. This has caused them to place distance between themselves and the owners of the business that they manage (that is, the councils), and the local citizens they ostensibly serve, to the extent that they have described their job as providing goods and services to customers rather than providing services for citizens. I will show that the adoption of such an attitude is inappropriate when placed within the context of local-government-owned and operated business concerns. From the point of view of European settlement, New Zealand is a very young country, especially in the administrative sector. To provide a background to this project and to suggest the main lines of development of local government in New Zealand, I have included a prologue that outlines the history of local government in New Zealand.

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  • Speech style in gendered communication

    Hannah, Annette (1999)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Dr Annette Hannah is a registered Psychologist in New Zealand and invites enquiries regarding this research: ahannahnz@gmail.com This research was further published in the Journal of Language and Social Psychology: Hannah A, & Murachver T. Gender and conversational style as predictors of Conversational behaviour. Vol 18, No2, June 1999, 153-174. Hannah A, & Murachver T. Gender Preferential Responses to Speech. Vol 26, No 3, Sept. 2007 274-290.

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  • Tourism policy implementation in the Philippines, 1973-2009

    de la Santa, Edieser (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xv, 362 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes :University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The role of film in destination decision-making

    Croy, William Glen (2007)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Format: xv, 346 leaves: ill. (chiefly col.); 30 cm.

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  • Geology of the Takitimu group and associated intrusive rocks, central Takitimu Mountains, western Southland, New Zealand

    Houghton, Bruce Frank (1977)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: 2 v. : illus. maps (in pocket) ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Geology. Thesis (Ph.D. in geology) - University of Otago. Includes bibliography.

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  • The meat purchase decision : An experimental study

    Hamlin, Robert P (1997)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: x, 423 leaves : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Marketing. "December 1997." Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Gel electrophoretic studies on the chromosome of bacteriophage T5

    Hayward, Gary Selwyn (1972)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xvi, 137 leaves : illus. ; 28 cm. Notes: University of Otago department : Biochemistry. Thesis (Ph.D. in Biochemistry) - University of Otago. Bibliography: p.127-137.

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  • T. S. Eliot, 'Four quartets' and the mediaeval mind

    Sinclair, John (1987)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The subject of this study is the tradition which gives meaning to T.S. Eliot's Four Quartets. Eliot insisted that the significance of a literary work is determined by its relationship with the works which have preceded it. Before it can be said to present a credible vision of its contemporary world, a new work of literature must be defined and shaped by the order formed by the literature of the past. Having submitted to this discipline, the new work can then, in turn, redefine and reshape its governing tradition. The successful operation of this process, Eliot stressed, demanded of the poet a constant refinement of technique and a constant search for the most instructive literary models. The development of Eliot's own work from the early poems to Four Quartets involved just such a search for the tradition within Western literature which best expressed the quintessence of the 'mind' of Europe. A major feature of this development was a growing appreciation, both literary and intellectual, for the mediaeval era, and especially for its premier literary artist, Dante Alighieri. In Four Quartets Eliot attempted to appropriate for his own poetry something of the maturity of Dante's poetic art and of the literary, philosophical, social and theological traditions which informed it. A major characteristic of Eliot's poetry had always been its use of images and allusions to isolate specific traditions of thought and expression and import into a modem setting the connotations and resonances previously associated with them. The allusive texture of the Quartets makes frequent reference to Dante and to other mediaeval writings, either directly, by borrowing images and phrases and by adopting or imitating conventions of thought and literary form, or indirectly, by invoking traditions which themselves look to the example of mediaeval Christendom or which, in departing from it, contributed to the decay of the European mind which Eliot saw in the advance of the Renaissance. Many of these allusions have been noted and discussed in isolation by previous commentators. However, there has been no attempt to collate Eliot's mediaeval sources or to explore this aspect of his work as the conscious evocation of an axis-age in European culture. Eliot's constant recourse to the literature of the Middle Ages in Four Quartets will be illustrated by the consideration of his handling of five major themes or conventions which-perhaps not unintentionally-bear a striking resemblance to the major 'topoi' of Dante's Commedia. The first to be studied will be Eliot's use of four specific landscapes whose personal associations combine with their innate symbolic resonances to form the matrices for the wider speculations of each of the four poems. What this investigation will show is that Eliot consciously seeks and then locates value in the past. The progression from the landscape of Burnt Norton to that of Little Gidding reveals a development in the poet's mind from a consideration of personal experience to a meditation upon that of a community which sought to live out the mediaeval Christian ideal upon English soil. The second theme which will be studied is that which is introduced in the opening passage of Burnt Norton and to which the Quartets return repeatedly: the consideration of the nature of time. My account of this theme will show that, although various conceptions of time are entertained within the sequence, the approach which is finally espoused bears a close affinity to Augustine's attempt-which remained the most influential for more than a millenium-to explain time in its relation both to mankind's temporal experience and to the Christian notion of the eternity of God. The emotional centre of Four Quartets - the poet's account of his experience in the rosegarden at Burnt Norton -will be considered next. The full significance of the rose-garden is to be discerned only in its relationship to the tradition of garden-imagery to which it makes allusion, and especially to Dante's use of the conventions of courtly love in La VitaNuova and the Divina Commedia. By linking the personal core of feelings which were associated with the experience at Burnt Norton to Dante's account of his own love nostalgia Eliot is invoking not only a rich literary tradition but also the philosophical traditions which enabled Dante to explain and assign meaning to his personal feelings within the context of universal and theological truths. The wider ramifications of this philosophical background will be shown to have an increasing importance for Eliot's exploration in the remainder of the Quartets of the significance of the rose-garden experience. An important aspect of this expansion of the meaning of the personal core of the Quartets is Eliot's treatment of it as a spiritual and ultimately a theophanic experience. This theme will be taken up next. Eliot's debt to works of mystical literature in Four Quartets is wellknown, but has generally been treated in isolation from the larger patterns of imagery and allusion. It will be argued that the mystical sources used in the Quartets form an order which evokes the religious sensibility of the Middle Ages. This is immediately apparent in Eliot's allusions to Dante, StJohn of the Cross, and the English mystics of the fourteenth century; but even in his inclusion of mystical sources from other periods and other religious traditions - the Bhagavad-Gita is the obvious example Eliot is seeking to highlight aspects of religious sensibility which found their fullest expression in Christendom. The debt to the mediaeval era extends even to the cosmological metaphors which Eliot adopted to describe the physical aspect of the 'world' of the Quartets. Although not as systematic as Dante's Ptolemaic system, the universe of Eliot's sequence of poems is nevertheless described in spatial metaphors which, though ancient in origin, point once more to the all-embracing universal order envisaged by mediaeval philosophy. This study will be supplemented with a lengthy appendix which notes the other sources and allusions in the Quartets and explores their contribution to the larger schemes which determine the order of the poem and point to the tradition which gives it meaning.

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  • Memory-work : understanding consumer satisfaction and dissatisfaction of clothing retail encounters

    Friend, Lorraine A. (1997)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This research investigated the process and meaning of consumer satisfaction and dissatisfaction in women's clothing retail encounters. It utilised a 'memory-work' methodology which operationalised storytelling and allowed a detailed examination of consumer experiences of retail encounter in 'real life' situations. The qualitative data was derived from memory-texts provided by nine women in Hamilton, New Zealand. Over a period of four months, each woman wrote five detailed stories based on her experiences evoked from specific themes chosen to trigger satisfying or dissatisfying experiences of clothing shopping for themselves. For each trigger, details of the participant's memory texts were analysed and compared in group discussions, by the participants as well as the researcher, to obtain both self and social meanings of their experiences. The memory-texts illustrated how the consumers evaluated and attached meanings to the context and events which occurred in the clothing retail encounters. The analysis of these revealed that the consumer appraised her interactions based on her self identity, experiences and social context. It illustrated that the process of consumer satisfaction and dissatisfaction was centred around the evaluation of the self rather than the service/product attributes and performances. This overall appraisal was based on whether or not the consumer was threatened, or had her values enhanced, and thus the extent to which she belonged. The nature and intensity of satisfaction and dissatisfaction depended not only on the consumer matching her goals and values, but was a complex result of the cognitive, affective, and socio-cultural contexts.

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  • The Burton Brothers studio : commerce in photography and the marketing of New Zealand, 1866-1898

    Whybrew, Christine M. (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The Burton Brothers studio of Dunedin, the most renowned ofNew Zealand's colonial photographers, was among the first to present photographs of colonial New Zealand to international audiences. From 1866 to 1898 this studio produced a stock of photographic images that recorded the industrial, social and political progress of the colony. Burton Brothers photographs were produced in series and included topographical views of locations, such as Milford Sound and the King Country, or were targeted to specific projects or events, such as the eruption of Mount Tarawera and the government survey of the Sutherland Falls. Alfred Henry Burton, the studio's director, accompanied the Union Steam Ship Company's first tourist excursion to Fiji, Samoa and Tonga, and photographs from this series and those of King Country Maori are valued as ethnographic records of indigenous peoples. Now prized as documentary artefacts in institutional collections, the "truth" value of these photographs is compromised by their production as marketable commodities. By examining the intended purpose that informed the creation and distribution of these photographs, this thesis disrupts conventional interpretations of Burton Brothers photographs as historical records. This thesis examines photographs as physical objects, prioritising the material properties of the photograph over image content. This methodology is informed and guided by the close and systematic study of Burton Brothers photographs in their original formats, including albumen prints, cartes de visite, stereographs, lantern slides, albums and the studio's original wet collodion and gelatin dry plate negatives. All prints released by the studio were inscribed with the firm's trademark (brand), negative number and a descriptive caption. Each series of photographs was promoted by a non-illustrated catalogue, containing an excerpt from the photographer's diary or other written narrative that operated as contextual description for the photographs. These textual elements function to direct interpretation in accordance with the studio's commercial agenda and in alignment with contemporary social and political ideologies. The impression of New Zealand circulated by Burton Brothers photographs was derived more from the text accompanying and overlaying these photographic products than the image content. This "textual overlay" allows insight into the studio's purpose m producing, releasing and marketing photographic products. Through this, the context of production is analysed and Burton Brothers photographs are examined as products of commercial endeavour, accessing a greater understanding of the commercial photography trade in nineteenth century New Zealand.

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  • A tectonic synthesis of the Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt

    Jugum, Dushan (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt (DMOB) is an Early-Permian ophiolite sequence exposed in the South Island of New Zealand. The ophiolite is overlain by the thick deep-marine sedimentary Maitai Group. The Alpine Fault divides the DMOB into two sections, one in Nelson and the other in Southland. The DMOB is divided into three different units based on lithology and geochemistry: the Livingstone Ophiolite, which is a typical ophiolite sequence dipping sub-vertically and facing west; the Otama Mélange, a deformed ocean-floor assemblage with no ultramafics or serpentinites and a greater amount of felsic rocks than the other two units; and the Patuki Mélange, a highly deformed ophiolite structurally beneath the Livingstone Ophiolite. The Lvingstone Ophiolite has three phases of igneous activity. The first phase is represented by cumulates, massive gabbro, and extensive pillow lavas. It has a MORB-like geochemistry with a subtle above-subduction signature. The age of this phase is 277.6 ± 3.3 Ma using U/Pb in zircon. The second phase locally intrudes the first with dykes which are feeders for extensive non-pillowed lava flows of variable thickness. The age of the second phase (275.2 ± 5.4 Ma) cannot be distinguished from the first. The second phase has a stronger above-subduction geochemical signature than the first phase. The third phase comprises felsic and intermediate dykes that cut the first two phases and intrude into the sediments overlying the DMOB. This phase has not been directly dated but has the same geochemistry as the felsic rocks in the Otama Mélange. The igneous rocks of the Otama Mélange are 50% felsic and have an age of 269.3 ± 4.5 Ma. The mafic and felsic rocks from the Otama Mélange have a strong above-subduction geochemistry, but are not typical of arcs. The Patuki Mélange contains both MORB-like and OIB igneous rocks in a serpentinite matrix. The MORB-like Patuki Mélange is similar to the first stage of igneous activity in the Livingstone Ophiolite. Sediment blocks within the Patuki Mélange have been correlated with the Maitai Group, based on their petrology and detrital zircon age pattern. These sediments have a youngest detrital zircon age of Late Permian through to the Early Triassic. The Maitai Group sediment are distal in character within the Patuki Mélange and more proximal above the Livingstone Ophiolite. I infer that the Livingstone Ophiolite represents a fore-arc, and the Otama Mélange a localization of the Livingstone ophiolites stage three igneous activity in that fore-arc (possibly due to ridge subduction). The Patuki Mélange is either an off-scraping of a subducted slab or part of the trench wall of the above-subduction crust. The DMOB may have been part of the same ocean-crust as the Brook Street Terrane during its formation, but there is no specific evidence for this. Detrital zircons from the Caples Terrane are almost exclusively Triassic in age. The Maitai Group may have some time overlap with the oldest Murihiku Terrane. The DMOB is identical in geology and age to the Yakuno Ophiolite in Japan which may have once been part of the same subduction-zone before the opening of the Neo-Tethys. Detrital zircons from the Aspiring Terrane have a Jurassic age 154.1 ± 2.0 Ma, which constrains the age of the metamorphism of the Haast Schist. The DMOB has been highly deformed with evidence for extensional structure reactivated in compression on the sea-floor during igneous activity; however, most of the observed internal deformation in the DMOB is Cenozoic in age. The serpentinites are completely overprinted by the oblique compression through New Zealand since the Miocene.

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