416 results for Undergraduate

  • Fighting fit? A study of the Army's medical examinations, 1916-1918.

    Callon, Lynette (1980)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 57 leaves :ill. (some col.), col. map ; 30 cm.

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  • Between two worlds : a study of the letters, diaries and reminiscences of some Otago and Southland soldiers in the Great War.

    Chen, Mindy (1982)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 60 leaves :ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • A separate world? : the social position of the mentally ill in New Zealand society, 1945-1955

    Grant, Susannah (1998)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    69 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy). "October 1998."

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  • The functions of an institution : the Otekaieke Special School for Boys, 1908-1950

    Bardsley, Sandra (1991)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 82 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopied)

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  • Attitudes to marriage in selected New Zealand periodicals, 1960-1969

    Bannister, Carole A. (1991)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 73 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • The political lessons of Tomorrow's schools : what can be learnt from the outcomes and implications of Tomorrow's schools

    Connew, Scott Joseph (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 64 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies. "October 2003."

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  • The alienation of Maori land

    Alcock, Warren Dean Charles (1992)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 74 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 71-74). University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Management and allocation of fresh water in New Zealand:

    Bartrum, Lisa Cherie (2004)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    93 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 69-80). University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Bryce v. Rusden : the vindication of a colony.

    Clendon, W. Ross (1973)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    PREFACE John Bryce was Minister of Native Affairs in New Zealand during the early 1880’s. Perhaps the first note-worthy point about him is his comparative obscurity, but when his name is recognised it is usually in connection with the leading role he played in the invasion of the Maori village of Parihaka in 1881. Later generations have come to regard that episode as cause for regret and even shame on the part of the Pakeha, and as evidence of the harshness and injustice which seems to have characterised so much of the colonists’ treatment of the Maoris. Some of Bryce’s contemporaries, especially those in England, also saw the Parihaka affair in this light, none more so than George William Rusden. His History of New Zealand, published in 1883, was a savage and lengthy indictment of the colony’s native policies over forty years, in particular of those policies pursued by John Bryce. Some of the aspersions made by Rusden against “the bully of Parihaka” were to result in the libel action of Bryce v. Rusden which was fought in London in 1886. When John Bryce sailed for England to vindicate his good name before a British judge and jury, he had behind him the moral support of his fellow colonists in New Zealand. They saw Bryce as being on a mission to defend not only his honour but also the honour of the colony as a whole; his cause was theirs also. This essay attempts to demonstrate the extent to which Bryce was regarded as a spokesman for all the colonists in New Zealand, and an effort has been made to determine just how successful he was in removing a stigma from the colony. It is also hoped that in the course of the essay some better understanding may be reached of John Bryce as a man and as a colonist and not merely as the plaintiff in the action. For, as both his detractors and his admirers would concede, John Bryce was a man who probably came closer than any of his political colleagues to typifying the ordinary colonist of his day. He was, in fact, the settler personified.

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  • Stir, bustle and whir! : a history of the New Zealand Clothing Factory, 1873-1905

    Isaac, Penelope Sheila (1996)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    74 leaves :ill., map, port. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 71-74). Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Child Mortality after Discharge from a Health Facility Following Suspected Pneumonia, Meningitis and Septicaemia in Rural Gambia

    Chhibber, Aakash Varun (2015)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Background Two years away from 2015, the decline in child mortality is not fast enough to reach Millennium Development Goal 4. The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) is a strategy that simplifies management of child health. Beyond effective disease management, IMCI recommendations for care following illnesses are based on limited evidence from the field. The aim of this project was to find (1) the magnitude of and (2) risk factors for child mortality following discharge from a health facility in a low-income setting. Methods This study used an established population-based surveillance system for suspected invasive pneumococcal disease in Upper River Region, The Gambia, West Africa. Children that survived admission for suspected pneumonia, meningitis or septicaemia at the Region’s only referral centre (Basse Major Health Centre, Upper River Region) were followed for 180 days after discharge. Vitality status monitored by the DSS informed time-to-death information in a survival analysis that identified predictors of post-discharge mortality. Two multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed. Model A described the clinical syndrome on admission (provisional diagnosis) and risk of post-discharge mortality. Model B used a reverse step-wise approach to find pre-discharge risk factors for mortality following discharge. Results The cohort that survived admission had higher mortality rates than the background rate in the community. Overall, 105 (2.8%) of 3735 patients died during the 6 months of follow-up. Half of the deaths occurred within 45 days of discharge. Approximately half as many patients died in the six months following discharge as died during hospital admission. Age stratified post-discharge mortality rates were three to six times higher than community mortality rates. In addition to demonstrating the protective effect of increasing age at discharge (HR 0.98 [95%CI: 0.96, 0.99] for every month increase in age), Model A showed that, compared to pneumonia alone, a provisional diagnosis of: pneumonia with visible signs of severe malnutrition had a HR 8.74 (95%CI: 4.93, 15.49); meningitis with visible signs of severe malnutrition had a HR of 13.90 (95%CI: 5.43, 35.58); sepsis with visible signs of severe malnutrition had a HR 18.79 (95%CI: 11.65, 30.32). Model B showed independent risk factors associated with post-discharge mortality were: the presence of neck stiffness on assessment (HR 17.60 [95%CI: 7.36, 42.10]); low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) (<10.5cm, HR 11.52 [4.59, 28.90]); visible signs of severe malnutrition (HR 3.94 [95%CI: 2.11, 7.36]); non- medical discharge (HR 6.22 [95%CI: 2.98, 13.01]); discharge during dry season (HR 2.33 [95%CI: 1.44, 3.77]); decreasing peripheral arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation (HR 0.95 [95%CI: 0.93, 0.98] per percent increase); decreasing haemoglobin concentration (HR 0.82 [95%CI: 0.74, 0.90]) per unit g/dL increase); and decreasing axillary temperature (HR 0.70 [0.58, 0.84] per unit oC increase). Conclusion Gambian children in Upper River Region with suspected invasive pneumococcal disease are at increased risk of death following discharge from a health facility, and most of these deaths occur early. There are identifiable risk factors for death, including neck stiffness, low MUAC, visible signs of severe malnutrition, non-medical discharge, discharge during dry season, decreasing peripheral arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation, decreasing haemoglobin concentration and decreasing axillary temperature. These data add to the evidence base needed to inform the development key guidelines and may be helpful towards development of a tool with clinical utility to identify children for intervention after discharge from hospital.

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  • Take that, you dirty commie! : the rise of a Cold War consciousness in New Zealand, 1944-1949.

    Kay, Richard G. H. (1994)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    106 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 97-106. Typescript (photocopied)

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  • "Unfortunate folk" : a study of the social context of committal to Seacliff Asylum 1928-1937

    Holloway, Judith Anne (1991)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    137 leaves :ill., facsims ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 134-137. Typescript (photocopied)

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  • The hill of health : aspects of community at Waipiata Sanatorium 1923-1961

    Haugh, Susan Margaret (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    102 leaves, [21] p. of plates :ill., facsim., map, ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 101-102.

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  • 24 – hour oxygen saturation recordings at discharge in preterm infants

    Wellington, Grace Charlotte (2016)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Preterm infants have an immature respiratory system and therefore experience an increased number of respiratory pauses and oxygen desaturations. There is now advanced pulse oximetry technology that can record oxygen saturations every two seconds for extended periods of time. There has been insufficient literature that reports the incidence of intermittent hypoxia at time of discharge home from the neonatal unit in preterm infants using new generation oximeters. These respiratory events preterm infants experience have been shown to have some effect on neurodevelopment, but their effect on growth has not been investigated before. The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of intermittent hypoxia in preterm infants at time of discharge home from the neonatal unit. The study also addresses the issue of artefact within oximetry recordings and compares results from automatically edited, manually edited and unedited oximetry data, as well as determining whether overnight 12-hour recordings are of equal value to full 24-hour recordings. The secondary aim of this study was to determine whether intermittent hypoxia at discharge has any effect on post discharge growth and to determine changes in amount of intermittent hypoxia from discharge oximetry to oximetry one-month post discharge. We recruited preterm infants from the Wellington neonatal intensive care unit. A 24-hour pulse oximetry recording was performed immediately prior to the infant’s discharge home. These oximetry recordings were analysed and median values for measures reported from oximetry recordings were determined. Rules to manually edit oximetry data were created and applied to oximetry recordings. These manually edited reports were then compared with automatically edited and unedited reports. Each recording was also edited to resemble a 12-hour overnight recording and this was compared to the full 24-hour recording. Infants born less than 32 weeks gestational age were further followed up with weekly growth measurements for one-month. A repeat 24-hour oximetry recording was performed at one-month post discharge for these infants and compared to their discharge recording. We report high rates of intermittent hypoxia in preterm infants at time of discharge home from the neonatal unit. For example the median 4% oxygen desaturation index (DSI 4%). was 57.9 events per hour. The incidence of these events decreased with advancing post-menstrual age. Rates of intermittent hypoxia one month post discharge were greatly decreased from discharge with improvements of 42% - 57% seen, with DSI 4% reducing to 25.5 events per hour. This study did not show a significant association between intermittent hypoxia and post-discharge growth, possibly because of the small sample size in this study subgroup. There were few clinically relevant differences on reports edited manually compared with automatically edited reports, with some difference when compared to unedited reports. We recommend automatically editing oximetry reports as this gives similar results to manual editing for the majority of measures, however the nadir of the fall in oxygen saturation is often artefact, and even after automatic editing is the one measure that may remain false. The 24-hour oximetry reports were clinically similar to 12-hour recordings and therefore we suggest 12-hour oximetry studies are sufficient.

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  • What’s the harm in waiting? Patient harms in the referral waiting gap

    Patel, Vimal (2016)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Background Patient safety research seeks to improve the delivery of care, and ensure that patients’ risk of injury from healthcare itself is minimised. Referral between primary healthcare, specialist diagnostic agencies (such as community medical laboratories and radiological centres), and hospital based healthcare is common and important in primary care, yet patients have highly variable waiting times before receiving their care. However, there is almost no research exploring what happens to patients while they wait. Aims This study aims to investigate patient’s waiting periods between referral from their General Practitioner (GP) and receiving specialist healthcare. Specifically, this study aims to determine if patients come to any harm in this waiting gap, and if so, which patients are harmed and what types of harm happen. Methods I reviewed 5 years (2003-2007) of healthcare records of 201 general practice patient’s notes. Each consultation record was examined to identify the types of referral that were made and to find evidence of harms while the patient was waiting for referred healthcare. A subset of 101 of these patients also had the records reviewed for investigation types and evidence of harm while waiting for investigation. A broad definition of harm was used to capture a greater number of harms. Harms were categorised as related to referral for investigation, referral to medical specialty or referral to other non-medical specialty. Harms were also graded in severity (mild, moderate and severe) and were described under the following: ‘continued symptoms’, ‘delay in subsequent management’, ‘deterioration of condition’, ‘financial cost to patient’, ‘anxiety/mental harm’ or ‘other’. Comparisons were made between patients whose referrals had evidence of harm in the waiting gap with patients who did not. Comparisons included length of waiting gap, age, gender and specialty referred to and used t-tests or non-parametric tests, as appropriate. Results 5003 Consultation records were reviewed. A referral rate of 0.21 per person per year for medical and non-medical specialties was found, and a referral rate of 1.00 per person per year for investigations was found. 45 of 183 (25.5%) of referrals to medical or non-medical specialties had evidence of harm in the waiting gap, whereas 9 of 105 (1.8%) of referrals for investigation had harm in the waiting gap. Of the 58 total harms, 43 (74.1%) of harms were minor, 12 (20.5%) were moderate and 3 (5.2%) were severe. The largest broad classification of harm was “continued symptoms” with 38 harms (65.5%), followed by “delay in subsequent management” with 14 harms (24.1%) and “deterioration in condition” with 14 harms (24.1%). There were no statistically significant relationships between the age of patient nor sex of patient nor length of waiting time and the incidence of harm in the waiting gap. Conclusion This is the first study of harm in the referral waiting gap. The findings indicate that harm does happen while patients wait for referred care, and more research is needed to explore these harms. While the relatively small number of patients in this study limits the ability to draw robust implications for changed clinical practice, it is a strong starting point for larger, future research.

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  • Umbilical Cord Serum Chemokines and the Development of Atopic Dermatitis

    Townsley, Hermaleigh (2016)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic skin condition characterised by the development of pruritic and inflamed lesions. One key component of AD pathogenesis is a cutaneous hyper-reactivity to allergens influenced by a Th2-polarised immune response. Macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) and Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) are two chemokines involved in this pathological immune response. Research has shown a strong association between MDC and TARC levels in blood and AD severity. Recently, some cohort studies have suggested that levels of MDC and TARC in umbilical cord blood (UCB) may be predictive of whether infants will develop AD during childhood. This cohort study aimed to further investigate the potential predictive value of UCB MDC and TARC for AD development in childhood. Methods: This project involved a retrospective analysis of data obtained from the NZA2CS population birth cohort study. Information about AD-related outcomes was gathered using questionnaires at various time points, along with physical examination of flexural dermatitis and measurement of total and specific IgE levels at age six. UCB MDC levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques for a total of 647 participants. Haemolysis of UCB samples was found to affect TARC measurement; therefore fewer (n = 270) samples were analysed for TARC. Haemolysis of UCB samples did not affect measurement of MDC concentration. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios to determine the association between UCB chemokine levels and development of AD- related outcomes in childhood. Results: UCB MDC and TARC levels were not predictive of development of AD at age six. Neither were they consistently significantly associated with the development of AD-related outcomes such as an itchy rash or atopy. Some statistically significant associations were found, although their value is difficult to interpret as these were isolated findings. UCB MDC levels were significantly associated with the development of an itchy rash at four years of age (p = 0.027) and with the level of specific IgE to cat allergen at age six (p = 0.05). When the data was segregated by sex, UCB MDC levels in males were consistently significantly associated with development of an itchy rash during childhood (p < 0.05). Conclusion: UCB MDC and TARC concentrations are unlikely to be clinically useful biomarkers for the development of AD in childhood. This was the largest cohort study so far to investigate cord MDC and TARC levels as predictors of future AD onset, and the findings are concordant one other large cohort study. Therefore, these results do not warrant further research into UCB MDC and TARC as predictive biomarkers of AD development.

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  • An analysis of vessel loading of export logs at four New Zealand ports.

    Duval, Alfred W. (2016)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Over half of New Zealand’s annual harvest was exported as logs in 2015 (MPI, 2016). The large scale and economic importance of log exports highlights the importance of efficient port operations. Productive cycle elements for the log loading operation were defined. The vessel loading cycle was split into six elements: three ‘action elements’ (loading, tallying, and slinging), and three ‘carting elements’ between the ‘action elements’. Time study measurements were carried out at four New Zealand ports (Tauranga, Marsden Point, Gisborne, and Port Chalmers) to identify differences in productive time to load log export vessels. Port Chalmers wasn’t compared to the other ports as it was too different operationally. Loading had the longest productive element time, followed by slinging and tallying, and lastly the ‘carting elements’. Loading was uninfluenced by port but affected by log grade, length, operator skill, and the time of day. Tallying was significantly different between the three ports with Marsden Point fastest and Tauranga slowest. Slinging was quickest in Gisborne and faster whilst loading below-deck and during the daytime. Carting elements were heavily influenced by distance to or from log stack for all four ports. Tauranga displayed the fastest historic gross load rate (JASm³/hour) yet the slowest productive cycle time. Gross load rate is influenced by delays, volume per cycle, and productive cycle time. The difference in productive time and gross load rate could therefore be assumed to be from increased volume per cycle and/or reduced delays in Tauranga. Exporters are fined for loading slower than scheduled. This cost is greater when shipping rates are high as fines are based on shipping rates. A 5% increase in loading efficiency can save the exporter US$11,000 per vessel at historic maximum shipping rates.

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  • Native forest monitoring : tracking changes in native forest remnants.

    Arnold, T. A. H. (2016)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Native forest monitoring is undertaken by forest companies as a requirement for certification of their forests by groups such as the FSC. It is important for companies to be able to track changes that are occurring to native forest remnants that are often spread throughout their operational plantation forest estate. Pan Pac tasked me with completing their 2016 native forest monitoring programme and review the results that have been collected since the programme was implemented in 2002. The objective of this was to both gain a better understanding of how the composition of the remnants in their5 estate is changing and to make recommendations on how the programme could be improved in the future. The majority of the 11 Permanent Sample Plots (PSPs) measured were in good or stable condition, several of which showed strong regeneration of the understory over the past 14 years. Three of the sites have been affected by heavy ungulate browsing (deer and/or goats), which has resulted in the continued suppression of the understory vegetation. While all current canopy layers of the PSP have not changed significantly, current and future disturbance such as ungulate browse could result in a change in composition from the current forest makeup. Ungulate browsing has been identified as the biggest driver of change in the native forest remnants within Pan Pac’s estate. To further examine to magnitude of this, exclosure plots could be established in impacted remnants to assess the effect of removal of browsing pests as a basis for Pan Pac to make decisions about future ungulate control. Continued monitoring of native forests is key to be able to identify as well as understand what is happening with native forest remnants. Tracking composition change is important as it allows the forest manager to target management practices such as ungulate control to combat non-natural changes that are occurring.

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  • Falcon Forestry Carriage Series 2 : a case study of productivity and operation.

    Bolitho, Callum (2015)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The multiple drivers of workplace safety and increasing productivity are resulting in increased mechanisation within the forestry industry. The use of motorised grapples in cable harvesting is an applicable mechanisation method to the large proportion of steep terrain harvesting in New Zealand. In this dissertation a time study of the Falcon Forestry Carriage Series 2 has been undertaken in order to access its productivity and operation. Mean values of productivity were found to be 54.9m³/PMH for wood extracted from the ground, 64.6m³/PMH for bunched wood and 75.6m³/PMH for excavator fed wood after adjustment for the cycle distance and accumulation type. Longer cycles were found to decrease productivity by 0.15m³/PMH for each meter of cycle distance. Utilisation in the study was found to be 56% of total time which was similar to previous studies. 15% of total study time was accounted for by operational delays, 7% by personal delays and 23% by mechanical delays. Mechanical problems with the carriage occurred 6 times and accounted for 171 minutes or 13.4% of total delay time. Mechanical delay breakdown was similar to that found by McFadzean (2012) who recorded that 15% of total delay time was attributable to carriage mechanical delays. During a study of Operator effect it was found that the inexperienced Operator 3 and Operator 4 had a productivity of 52.2% (not statistically significantly different) and 18.5% (p value <0.05). The effects of accumulation method and cycle distance upon productivity were found to be similar to the results of previous studies, as was the utilisation of time within the study.

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