407 results for Undergraduate

  • Declining Intramuscular Newborn Vitamin K Prophylaxis: An Exploration of Parental Decision Making and Influencing Factors

    Miller, Hayleigh (2016)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Objective Newborn infants are at risk of potentially life-threatening vitamin K deficiency bleeding. This is readily prevented with prophylactic vitamin K at birth. In New Zealand, the recommended route of prophylaxis is intramuscular (IM) but the uptake rates are lower than that of comparable countries. This study investigated the reasoning of parents who opted out of IM vitamin K prophylaxis for their newborn. Study Design Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifteen families from the Otago/Southland region of New Zealand about their choice to opt out of IM vitamin K. Interview data was analysed using thematic analysis in order to elucidate themes capturing important aspects of parental decision making. Results Parents opt out of IM vitamin K for a variety of reasons. These were clustered into three main themes: parental beliefs and values, concerns about their child’s welfare, and external influencing factors. Parents also raised a number of concerns regarding other perinatal and childhood interventions. Conclusion This study identified factors that influence parental decision making, and lead to a decision to opt out of IM newborn vitamin K prophylaxis. These findings can contribute to the wider body of literature that informs public health initiatives focused on newborn vitamin K prophylaxis.

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  • Comparison of Spironolactone versus Amlodipine in Hypertensive Cardiorenal Pathology

    Strickland, James Todd Langdale (2016)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Hypertension is endemic worldwide, afflicting up to 40% of the global population over the age of 25. Haemodynamic stretch stress from raised blood pressure is a driver for organ damage in the heart and kidney, contributing to potentially fatal conditions. Aldosterone activated mineralocorticoid receptors have also been shown to contribute to cardiorenal damage in a hypertensive state. This study compared the effects of spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (MRA), and amlodipine, a calcium channel blocker, when administered in a chronic hypertensive Cyp1a1-Ren2 transgenic rat model. Cyp1a1-Ren2 rats characteristically develop hypertension in a dose-dependent manner in response to dietary indole-3-carbinol (I3C). Male rats (19 week old) were assigned to either standard or I3C (0.167% w/w) diet, 2 weeks prior to experimental day 0. At experimental day 40, rats in both dietary groups were assigned into three drug treatment groups (n=4/group): spironolactone (8.82 mg/kg/day), amlodipine (0.44 mg/kg/day) or vehicle control oral dosing until termination at experimental day 85. Systolic blood pressures recorded at day 0 and day 85 were significantly higher in the I3C diet group compared to standard diet. Spironolactone and amlodipine did not reduce systolic blood pressure at day 85 compared to control groups. Urine volume, proteinuria, left ventricular wall thickness, glomerulosclerosis, renal fibrosis and renal populations of both macrophages and myofibroblasts were increased in the I3C dietary group compared to standard diet; however none of these variables were significantly reduced with either spironolactone or amlodipine treatment compared to the control group in the I3C diet group. A reduction in renal fibrosis and renal cortex macrophage infiltration was observed with spironolactone treatment compared to control in the I3C diet group; however this was not statistically significant. A blood pressure independent reduction in proteinuria was seen in the spironolactone treated rats compared to control, but was also not statistically significant. The trends identified with spironolactone treatment in this study were consistent with many other published works; however these studies suggest spironolactone has been shown to have many other protective characteristics unidentified in this study. Internal validity issues arose from initial stress-related difficulties, compromising intra-group comparisons. This and the underpowered nature of this study limit the interpretation of the study’s results. Therefore this study came to no conclusion in regards to blood pressure independent benefits of addition of spironolactone to a systemic hypertensive situation

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  • Swaggers and society : a New Zealand experience

    Steven, Graeme D. (1979)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    The aims of this study are two-fold. First, to reach an understanding of the swagger, his lifestyle, and his outlook on life. And second, to investigate the relationships between the swagger and various groups in New Zealand society, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The North Otago region was chosen as a base for the study because it has traditionally been regarded as one of the main swagger areas in New Zealand. The main town of Oamaru had a population of 4000 to 6000 in the 1890's, and was neither wholly urban or rural. As the service centre for the North Otago hinterland and a road, rail and sea centre, Oamaru had large numbers of itinerants, passing through the town. In the rural hinterland mixed cropping predominated, and this required large numbers of seasonal workers, which were drawn from outside the region. In Chapter One it is argued that rural itinerant workers were integrated into a rural structure that was both labour intensive and seasonal. Chapter Two discusses the characteristics which separate the swagger from other rural itinerants, which I have called, the "swag-carriers". In Chapter Three the conflict between the swagger and a developing bureaucracy, and middle class ideology in the late nineteenth century, is analysed. In Chapters Four and Five, the attitudes of rural and towns people towards the swagger are investigated. A model based on the value system of "reputation" and "respectability is used in Chapter Six to explain the ambivalence of attitudes towards the swagger, and to investigate an important aspect of the swagger psychology - his self esteem and his individuality.

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  • A comparative study of the influence that motor-manual felling and mechanised felling has on stem breakage.

    Andrews, S. D. (2015)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Motor-manual felling has been the predominate method of severing trees in the felling process of a forest harvesting operation. Yet this method has been coupled with numerous injuries and deaths, as trees can strike fallers during this task. An alternative felling method was developed in the form of mechanised tree felling, in an attempt to reduce the frequency of injuries. Subsequently, mechanised felling is poorly understood when compared to motor-manual felling upon the impact it has on stem breakage. 183 trees were assessed by measuring the frequency of breakage, height of the first break and the volume retention abilities of three felling treatments; motor-manual, mechanised felling out of the stand and mechanised felling into the stand. The effect that directional felling had upon the length to the first break was also investigated for motor-manual and mechanised felling out of the stand. The percentage of stems that broke once felled was 73%, 76% and 94% for motor-manual, mechanised out of the stand and mechanised into the stand felling respectively. The height at which the first break occurred for the aforementioned felling treatments was 71%, 71% and 69% of the total tree height. Mechanised felling out of the stand had the greatest volume retention ability with 94.5% of the trees total volume being below the first break. Followed by 93.7% for motor-manual and 91.9% for mechanised felling into the stand, however these differences were statistically insignificant (p=0.14). Lastly the length to the first break for motor-manual and mechanised felling out of the stand failed to statistically change when a tree was felled through a range of directions from downhill to uphill. The influence that motor-manual felling and mechanised felling out of the stand had on stem breakage is similar, yet mechanised felling into the stand had a much greater impact on the percentage of stems that broke. With further improvements in technology, it could be seen that the number of mechanised tree-felling operations over take motor-manual felling, as their impact on stem breakage is comparable.

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  • An investigation into the system production balance within three mechanised harvesting case studies.

    Malietoa, K. K. (2016)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Safety issues and high costs of traditional harvesting methods have been driving mechanisation increases in New Zealand. However, productivity increases from mechanisation alters system productivity balance. This can result in underutilised machinery and cause an increase in harvesting costs in real terms. A time study was carried out to understand the system productivity balance between felling, extraction and processing and the factors affecting system component productivity rates, for three case studies. The three case studies observed were (1) a semi-mechanised cable yarder extraction operation, (2) a fully-mechanised swing yarder operation and (3) a fully-mechanised ground based operation. There were large production imbalances between felling, extraction and processing in all three case studies. Felling was the most productive system component, being 98%, 37% and 88% (case studies 1 to 3 respectively) more productive than the bottleneck. System bottleneck for case studies 1 and 3 was extraction, and processing for case study 2. The number of stems bunched, number of stems shovelled, wind throw interference and machine position shift affected felling cycle time. For every stem bunched, average productivity decreased by 35% (24m³/PMH) and 21% (20.9m³/PMH) for case studies 2 and 3 respectively. Every additional stem shovelled reduced felling productivity by 7.4m³/PMH for case study 2. Haul distance, the number of stems extracted and site factor affected extraction productivity. Haul distance and the number of stems extracted had significant impact on hourly productivity for all case studies. Site factor affected hourly productivity by 6.9m³ and 56.7m³ for case studies 1 and 3 respectively, largely attributed to the cable system employed and ground conditions. Processing was affected by the number of logs cut per stem and if delimbing occurred. Delimbing and each additional log processed, decreased productivity by 16% and 14% respectively. These three case studies showed that mechanised systems are often not well balanced and result in system components being underutilised. Companies can consider task strategies, or machine sharing between systems to minimise the effect on cost.

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  • Genetic parameter estimates for growth traits of Eucalyptus bosistoana : assessment of two progeny trials in Marlborough, New Zealand.

    Burgess, Jack (2015)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper presents a follow up study to that was already completed by Luis et al. (2011). Luis et al (2011) investigated the survival of E. bosistoana half-sib families within two progeny trials in Marlborough, New Zealand. The study investigated genetic growth parameters of the same two progeny trials. Trees at Craven (progeny trial) were statistically taller and larger in diameter than Lawson (other progeny trial), which is likely to be a result of thinning occurring one year earlier at the Craven and Lawson North sites than at the Lawson East site. The progeny trials were set up into randomized incomplete blocks which allowed effective calculations of fixed and random effects from a mixed-effect linear model. The family, incomplete block and residual variances from the mixed-effect model made heritabilities of growth traits possible to calculate. Narrow sense heritabilities for diameter at breast height ranged from 0.13 to 0.18, while tree height heritabilities ranged from 0.1 to 0.17. The inter-site correlation of family performance was weak to moderate for both height;  Craven : Lawson North = 0.28  Craven : Lawson East = 0.44  Lawson East : Lawson North = 0.27 And diameter at breast height (dbh); Craven : Lawson North = 0.32 Craven : Lawson East = 0.39 Lawson East : Lawson North = 0.36 Heritabilities were weak to moderate for growth traits but there was substantial variation so selection is still likely to provide sufficient gain. Further studies will need to consider researching the genetic parameters of wood qualities of E. bosistoana.

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  • The Public Safety Conservation Act.

    Logan, Alastair John (1976)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    70 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Long essay.

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  • Mataora Bay Native School : cross cultural perspectives in a rural setting, 1903-1930.

    Locke, Cybele (1995)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    68 leaves :ill., ports. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 63-66). Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Rogernomics, predetermined policy or 'bureaucratic coup'?

    Barton, Andrew George (1989)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 65 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies.

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  • Desperate measures : murder, marriage and the media, 1900-1939

    McNair, Alexandra (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    91 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy). "1 October, 2003."

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  • Hydrography and photommetry : tools for artificial surfing reef studies?

    Scarfe, Bradley Edward (1999)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 104 leaves, [18] leaves of plates :ill., maps (some folded) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographic references. University of Otago department : Surveying. Cover title. "November 1999."

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  • The other class of women : maternity services available for destitute women in Dunedin, c.1886-1897

    McKay, Willow Reay (2002)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    98 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Milton, the rural depression experience

    Panjabi, Jayashree (1979)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: iv, 65 leaves : photo (fold.) ; 30 cm. Notes: Tapes of the interviews accompany this thesis. Not to be quoted without the author's permission. Bibliography: leaves 61-65.

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  • Mineralogy and geochemistry of paralavas in Otago and Southland, New Zealand

    Rait, Rachel Jane (1992)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    74 leaves :ill., 1 map ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 71-74. Errata note on t.p. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • Domestic disquiet? : New Zealand responses to conflict in Malaya/Malaysia 1954-1966

    Sargison, Georgina (2006)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 89 leaves, [9] leaves of plates :ill., facisms., ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 84-89. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Why did so many babies die? : infant mortality and causes of death in Dunedin, 1900-1920

    Schumacher, Conrad (1998)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 93 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints : major issues affecting the Fiordland tramping industry since 1952, using the Routeburn, Hollyford and Milford tracks as case studies.

    Patterson, Lewis J. (1995)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    69 leaves ; 31 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 64-69). Typescript (photocopy)

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  • A land fit for heroes? the Otago experience of the National Soldier Settlement Scheme after World War One.

    Maloney, Anne (1982)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    19 p., [2] leaves of plates :ill. ; 27 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The Queenstown-Lakes District rural residential development debate : an analysis on the current debate about protecting outstanding natural landscapes and controlling rural residential development in the Wakatipu Basin

    Baudet, François Eugene Nicholas (2001)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    80 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Surveying.

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  • Loving our national parks to death

    Mann, Amber (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 91 leaves :col. ill., plan ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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