426 results for Undergraduate

  • Dawn and Te Ao Hou : popular perspectives on assimilation and integration, 1950s-1960s

    Chan, Michael Adam (2008)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 90 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-90). University of Otago departments: History and Political Studies.

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  • A separate world? : the social position of the mentally ill in New Zealand society, 1945-1955

    Grant, Susannah (1998)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    69 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy). "October 1998."

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  • The other class of women : maternity services available for destitute women in Dunedin, c.1886-1897

    McKay, Willow Reay (2002)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    98 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints : major issues affecting the Fiordland tramping industry since 1952, using the Routeburn, Hollyford and Milford tracks as case studies.

    Patterson, Lewis J. (1995)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    69 leaves ; 31 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 64-69). Typescript (photocopy)

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  • A land fit for heroes? the Otago experience of the National Soldier Settlement Scheme after World War One.

    Maloney, Anne (1982)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    19 p., [2] leaves of plates :ill. ; 27 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Mepitel Film. The Effect of Mepitel Film Dressings on Acute Radiation-Induced Skin Reactions in Patients Receiving Post-Wide Local Excision Irradiation

    Sutherland, Annie Elizabeth Mary (2015)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    The most common malignancy for women in New Zealand is breast cancer. As part of their treatment regimen the majority of these women will receive radiation therapy. A significant number of patients will experience severe acute radiation-induced skin reactions. At the time of writing, there is no evidence-based standard treatment for these reactions, the most extreme of which is moist desquamation which has a severe effect on patient comfort and psychological well-being. Previous studies in our department had shown that Mepilex Lite, an adhesive soft silicon dressing (Mölnlycke Health Care AB, Gothenburg, Sweden), reduced the severity of acute radiation-induced skin reaction by 40% when used to treat existing erythema. It is theorised that these soft silicone dressings prevent further mechanical damage to the radiation-damaged basal layer of the skin, allowing time for repair. Mepitel Film is another soft silicone dressing from the same company. This Film is fully breathable, transparent, very thin and with no clinically significant bolus effect; it can be left on during radiation therapy and can therefore be used prophylactically. We hypothesized that Mepitel Film would be more successful in minimizing acute radiation induced skin reactions when used in this way. In order to test the hypothesis we conducted an intra-individual randomised controlled trial (n=80) which investigated whether the prophylactic use of Mepitel Film would be superior to aqueous cream in reducing both the incidence of moist desquamation and the severity of radiation-induced skin reactions in breast cancer patients. The skin area to be irradiated was divided into a medial half and lateral half (which included the axilla). These two halves were then randomised to Mepitel Film (trial area) or aqueous cream (control area) from the start of radiation treatment. This trial was carried out by the author and one other radiation therapist researcher (RTR) at the Dunedin Radiation Oncology Centre (DROC) in New Zealand. Modified RTOG as well as the modified Radiation-Induced Skin Reaction Assessment Scale (RISRAS) was used to assess the visible signs (researcher component) and symptoms (patient component) of the skin reactions. Patients were reviewed three times a week during radiation therapy treatment, then once a week post-treatment for four weeks or until reactions had completely resolved. All patients filled out an Exit Questionnaire after completion of treatment. This thesis analyses the results of the first 10 mastectomy patients and the first 10 non-mastectomy patients who completed the trial. The results of this 20 patient cohort demonstrated that Mepitel Film, when used prophylactically, completely prevented the occurrence of moist desquamation and decreased the severity of radiation-induced skin reactions by more than 90%. A major limitation of this trial was the fact that neither the researcher nor the patient could be blinded as it was very clear where the film was and it was important that the film remained in place for as long as possible (up to several weeks). In conclusion, the results of this study show that using Mepitel Film prophylactically reduces the incidence and severity of radiation-induced moist desquamation in breast cancer patients.

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  • Rogernomics, predetermined policy or 'bureaucratic coup'?

    Barton, Andrew George (1989)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 65 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies.

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  • Mataora Bay Native School : cross cultural perspectives in a rural setting, 1903-1930.

    Locke, Cybele (1995)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    68 leaves :ill., ports. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 63-66). Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Falling branches, dying roots? : bank branch closure in small towns

    McKirdy, Callum Blair (2000)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 140 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 134-140. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • The validity of a food frequency questionnaire in assessing the nutrient intake of New Zealand adults

    Bolch, Rachel (1994)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: ix, 58, 11, [25] leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. Notes: Cover title. University of Otago department: Human Nutrition. Thesis (B.C. Ap. Sc. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 1995. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The Workers' Dwellings Acts : their implementation in Dunedin, 1905-1916

    Elworthy, Eve (1987)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    2 v. :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • For the lesser peoples : Woodrow Wilson, national self-determination and the Ottoman Empire.

    Flaherty, Timothy James (1997)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    66, [iv] leaves ; 29 cm. Bibliography: leaves 64-66.

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  • Fighting fit? A study of the Army's medical examinations, 1916-1918.

    Callon, Lynette (1980)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 57 leaves :ill. (some col.), col. map ; 30 cm.

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  • The functions of an institution : the Otekaieke Special School for Boys, 1908-1950

    Bardsley, Sandra (1991)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 82 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopied)

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  • Child Mortality after Discharge from a Health Facility Following Suspected Pneumonia, Meningitis and Septicaemia in Rural Gambia

    Chhibber, Aakash Varun (2015)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Background Two years away from 2015, the decline in child mortality is not fast enough to reach Millennium Development Goal 4. The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) is a strategy that simplifies management of child health. Beyond effective disease management, IMCI recommendations for care following illnesses are based on limited evidence from the field. The aim of this project was to find (1) the magnitude of and (2) risk factors for child mortality following discharge from a health facility in a low-income setting. Methods This study used an established population-based surveillance system for suspected invasive pneumococcal disease in Upper River Region, The Gambia, West Africa. Children that survived admission for suspected pneumonia, meningitis or septicaemia at the Region’s only referral centre (Basse Major Health Centre, Upper River Region) were followed for 180 days after discharge. Vitality status monitored by the DSS informed time-to-death information in a survival analysis that identified predictors of post-discharge mortality. Two multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed. Model A described the clinical syndrome on admission (provisional diagnosis) and risk of post-discharge mortality. Model B used a reverse step-wise approach to find pre-discharge risk factors for mortality following discharge. Results The cohort that survived admission had higher mortality rates than the background rate in the community. Overall, 105 (2.8%) of 3735 patients died during the 6 months of follow-up. Half of the deaths occurred within 45 days of discharge. Approximately half as many patients died in the six months following discharge as died during hospital admission. Age stratified post-discharge mortality rates were three to six times higher than community mortality rates. In addition to demonstrating the protective effect of increasing age at discharge (HR 0.98 [95%CI: 0.96, 0.99] for every month increase in age), Model A showed that, compared to pneumonia alone, a provisional diagnosis of: pneumonia with visible signs of severe malnutrition had a HR 8.74 (95%CI: 4.93, 15.49); meningitis with visible signs of severe malnutrition had a HR of 13.90 (95%CI: 5.43, 35.58); sepsis with visible signs of severe malnutrition had a HR 18.79 (95%CI: 11.65, 30.32). Model B showed independent risk factors associated with post-discharge mortality were: the presence of neck stiffness on assessment (HR 17.60 [95%CI: 7.36, 42.10]); low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) (<10.5cm, HR 11.52 [4.59, 28.90]); visible signs of severe malnutrition (HR 3.94 [95%CI: 2.11, 7.36]); non- medical discharge (HR 6.22 [95%CI: 2.98, 13.01]); discharge during dry season (HR 2.33 [95%CI: 1.44, 3.77]); decreasing peripheral arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation (HR 0.95 [95%CI: 0.93, 0.98] per percent increase); decreasing haemoglobin concentration (HR 0.82 [95%CI: 0.74, 0.90]) per unit g/dL increase); and decreasing axillary temperature (HR 0.70 [0.58, 0.84] per unit oC increase). Conclusion Gambian children in Upper River Region with suspected invasive pneumococcal disease are at increased risk of death following discharge from a health facility, and most of these deaths occur early. There are identifiable risk factors for death, including neck stiffness, low MUAC, visible signs of severe malnutrition, non-medical discharge, discharge during dry season, decreasing peripheral arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation, decreasing haemoglobin concentration and decreasing axillary temperature. These data add to the evidence base needed to inform the development key guidelines and may be helpful towards development of a tool with clinical utility to identify children for intervention after discharge from hospital.

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  • Take that, you dirty commie! : the rise of a Cold War consciousness in New Zealand, 1944-1949.

    Kay, Richard G. H. (1994)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    106 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 97-106. Typescript (photocopied)

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  • Well-intentioned but ill-fated : the New Zealand Government's repatriation scheme for World War One returned soldiers, 1915-1930

    Neal, Sarah (2001)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    19 p., [2] leaves of plates :ill. ; 27 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy). "October 2001."

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  • The geology of the Homestead stream area, Lower Hakataramea Valley, South Canterbury

    Morton, Malcolm Russell (1971)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 93 leaves :maps ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 88-91. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • "A step to the right" : the restructuring of the New Zealand University Students Association in 1986

    Robertson, Grant (1994)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 76 leaves, [5] leaves of plates :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies. "October 1994."

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  • The bacillus of work : masculinity and the rehabilitation of disabled soldiers in Dunedin 1919 to 1939.

    Boston, Peter J. (1993)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    This is a work about perception and experience. It examines the way in which men disabled both by combat and disease incurred during their war service viewed themselves and their society. It is also a work about that society and how it collectively viewed the men who sacrificed the relative security and stability of civilian life for the rigours of war, and the efforts made by the state and voluntary groups in Dunedin towards their rehabilitation, or repatriation as it was more commonly termed at the time. In 1937, war service statistics compiled by the New Zealand Returned Soldiers' Association (NZRSA) found that of the 98,950 men who had served overseas with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF), 77,965 had been discharged upon their return to New Zealand, and 5822 had subsequently died. According to the 1936 census, 10,057 of these surviving men lived in the Otago and Southland areas. For the same year, census data found that the combined population of the provinces was 224,069. Returned servicemen therefore accounted for approximately 5% of the total provincial populations. Given that the casualty rate amongst the NZEF was 58% during the course of the war, it is reasonable to assume that at least 6000 Otago and Southland men had received some form of medical or rehabilitative care as a consequence of their war service. The major theme this thesis addresses is whether or not disabled men attached their postwar identity to the values for which they had fought once they began to experience the long-term physical, emotional, and economic losses wrought by their war service. To develop this theme, it has been necessary to examine a complicated array of sub-questions: what disabilities did men experience and was any particular medical or economic category of disabled men especially disadvantaged; how did medical knowledge affect the treatment and experience of men's disabilities; what impact did disability have on men's economic and family lives; what role did the symbolism attached to wounding by soldiers and society have upon the readjustment of men to their civilian lives; did the concept of the 'digger spirit' of comradeship, self-sacrifice, and duty create a collective identity amongst returned servicemen in postwar society; did war foster a sense of New Zealand national identity amongst the country's combatants; finally, upon whom was the responsibility of long-term rehabilitation placed? [from Introduction]

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