6,553 results for Modify

  • An evaluation of seasonal variations in footwear worn by adults with inflammatory arthritis: a cross-sectional observational study using a web-based survey

    Brenton-Rule, A; Hendry, GJ; Barr, G; Rome, K

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: Foot problems are common in adults with inflammatory arthritis and therapeutic footwear can be effective in managing arthritic foot problems. Accessing appropriate footwear has been identified as a major barrier, resulting in poor adherence to treatment plans involving footwear. Indeed, previous New Zealand based studies found that many people with rheumatoid arthritis and gout wore inappropriate footwear. However, these studies were conducted in a single teaching hospital during the New Zealand summer therefore the findings may not be representative of footwear styles worn elsewhere in New Zealand, or reflect the potential influence of seasonal climate changes. The aim of the study was to evaluate seasonal variations in footwear habits of people with inflammatory arthritic conditions in New Zealand. Methods: A cross-sectional study design using a web-based survey. The survey questions were designed to elicit demographic and clinical information, features of importance when choosing footwear and seasonal footwear habits, including questions related to the provision of therapeutic footwear/orthoses and footwear experiences. Results: One-hundred and ninety-seven participants responded who were predominantly women of European descent, aged between 46–65 years old, from the North Island of New Zealand. The majority of participants identified with having either rheumatoid arthritis (35%) and/or osteoarthritis (57%) and 68% reported established disease (>5 years duration). 18% of participants had been issued with therapeutic footwear. Walking and athletic shoes were the most frequently reported footwear type worn regardless of the time of year. In the summer, 42% reported wearing sandals most often. Comfort, fit and support were reported most frequently as the footwear features of greatest importance. Many participants reported difficulties with footwear (63%), getting hot feet in the summer (63%) and the need for a sandal which could accommodate a supportive insole (73%). Conclusions: Athletic and walking shoes were the most popular style of footwear reported regardless of seasonal variation. During the summer season people with inflammatory arthritis may wear sandals more frequently in order to accommodate disease-related foot deformity. Healthcare professionals and researchers should consider seasonal variation when recommending appropriate footwear, or conducting footwear studies in people with inflammatory arthritis, to reduce non-adherence to prescribed footwear.

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  • Characterisation of rhizobia associated with New Zealand native legumes (Fabaceae) and a study of nitrogen assimilation in Sophora microphylla

    Tan, Heng Wee

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    Many legume species have the capacity to fix atmospheric N₂ via symbiotic bacteria (generally termed “rhizobia”) in root nodules and this can give them an advantage under low soil N conditions if other factors are favourable for growth. There are four genera of native legumes, on the main New Zealand (NZ) islands. These are the closely related Carmichaelia, Clianthus and Montigena in the Carmichaelinae clade, tribe Galegeae, and Sophora, within the tribe Sophoreae: all are capable of nodulation. Little work has been done on the genotypic characterisation and host-range specificity of the rhizobia associated with NZ native legumes. Moreover, the ability of native legumes to assimilate soil N in comparison with their N₂ fixation has not been assessed. The primary objectives of this research were to 1) more fully characterise the rhizobia associated with the four genera of NZ native legumes, including their ability to cross nodulate different species and 2) assess the ability of Sophora microphylla to assimilate soil N in comparison with its N₂ fixation. Gene sequencing results indicated that the bacterial strains isolated from NZ native legumes growing in natural ecosystems in the current and previous studies were of the genus Mesorhizobium. Generally, the Carmichaelinae and Sophora species were nodulated by two separate groups of Mesorhizobium strains. Ten strains isolated from the Carmichaelinae showed 16S rRNA and nifH similar to the M. huakuii type strain, but had variable recA and glnII genes, novel nodA and nodC genes and the seven strains tested could produce functional nodules over a range of Carmichaelinae species but did not nodulate Sophora species. Forty eight strains isolated from Sophora spp. showed 16S rRNA similar to the M. ciceri or M. amorphae type strains, variable recA, glnII and rpoB genes and novel and specific nifH, nodA and nodC genes which were different from those of the Carmichaelinae strains. Twenty one Sophora strains tested were able to produce functional nodules on a range of Sophora spp. but none nodulated C. australis. However, eighteen of the twenty one strains produced functional nodules on Cl. puniceus. These results indicate that, in general, the ability of different rhizobial strains to produce functional nodules on NZ native legumes is likely to be dependent on specific symbiosis genes. Clianthus puniceus appears to be more promiscuous in rhizobial host than the other NZ native legumes species tested. Generally, strains isolated from NZ native Sophora spp. from the same field site grouped together in relation to their “housekeeping” gene sequences and ERIC-PRC fingerprinting banding patterns. Most strains were able to grow at pH 3 – pH 11 but only one showed phosphorus solubilisation ability and none showed siderophore production. The strains showed differences in their ability to promote the growth of S. microphylla under glasshouse conditions. DNA-DNA hybridisation tests indicated that strains isolated from New Zealand native Sophora spp. are of several new Mesorhizobium species. The ability of S. microphylla to utilise soil NO₃⁻ and NH₄⁺ in comparison with its N₂ fixation was assessed under glasshouse conditions. N₂ fixing (nodulated) plants showed substantially greater growth and tissue N content than those relying solely on NH₄NO₃, NO₃⁻ or NH₄⁺ up to the equivalent of 200 kg N ha⁻¹ and N limitation is likely to have been the major cause of reduced growth of non-N₂ fixing (non-nodulated) plants. NO₃⁻ levels were negligible in plant tissues regardless of NO₃⁻ supply, indicating that virtually all NO₃⁻ taken up was assimilated. Thus, there appears to be a limitation on the amount of NO₃⁻ that S. microphylla can take up. However, it is possible that S. microphylla could not access NO₃⁻ in the potting mix and further work is required using different substrate and more regular NO₃⁻ applications to confirm this. Plants showed NH₄⁺ toxicity symptoms at 25 kg NH₄⁺-N ha⁻¹ and above. Nitrate reductase activity was not detected in roots or leaves of mature S. microphylla in the field: all plants were nodulated. Overall, the two major findings of this research are 1) NZ native legumes are nodulated by diverse and novel Mesorhizobium species and 2) S. microphylla seedlings have limited ability to utilise soil inorganic N. Important future work based on the results obtained in this research is discussed.

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  • Protective socks for people with diabetes: a systematic review and narrative analysis

    Otter, S; Rome, K; Ihaka, B; South, A; Smith, M; Gupta, A; Joseph, F; Heslop, P

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Padded socks to protect the at-risk diabetic foot have been available for a number of years. However, the evidence base to support their use is not well known. We aimed to undertake a systematic review of padded socks for people with diabetes. Additionally, a narrative analysis of knitted stitch structures, yarn and fibres used together with the proposed benefits fibre properties may add to the sock. Assessment of the methodological quality was undertaken using a quality tool to assess non-randomised trials. From the 81 articles identified only seven met the inclusion criteria. The evidence to support to use of padded socks is limited. There is a suggestion these simple-to-use interventions could be of value, particularly in terms of plantar pressure reduction. However, the range of methods used and limited methodological quality limits direct comparison between studies. The socks were generally of a sophisticated design with complex use of knit patterns and yarn content. This systematic review provides limited support for the use of padded socks in the diabetic population to protect vulnerable feet. More high quality studies are needed; including qualitative components of sock wear and sock design, prospective randomized controlled trials and analysis of the cost-effectiveness of protective socks as a non-surgical intervention.

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  • Perceived barriers of New Zealand podiatrists in the management of arthritis

    Lansdowne, N; Brenton-Rule, A; Carroll, M; Rome, K

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background Rheumatic conditions can have a significant impact on the feet and requires effective management. Podiatric involvement in the management of rheumatic conditions has previously been found to be inadequate in a hospital-setting and no study has examined current trends across New Zealand. The aim was to evaluate the perceived barriers of New Zealand podiatrists in the management of rheumatic conditions. Methods A cross-sectional observational design using a web-based survey. The self-administered survey, comprising of thirteen questions, was made available to podiatrists currently practicing in New Zealand. Results Fifty-six podiatrists responded and the results demonstrated poor integration of podiatrists into multidisciplinary teams caring for patients with arthritic conditions in New Zealand. Dedicated clinical sessions were seldom offered (16%) and few podiatrists reported being part of an established multidisciplinary team (16%). A poor uptake of clinical guidelines was reported (27%) with limited use of patient reported outcome measures (39%). The majority of podiatrists expressed an interest in professional development for the podiatric management of arthritic conditions (95%). All surveyed podiatrists (100%) agreed that there should be nationally developed clinical guidelines for foot care relating to arthritis. Conclusions The results suggest that there are barriers in the involvement of podiatrists in the management of people with rheumatic conditions in New Zealand. Future studies may provide an in-depth exploration into these findings to identify and provide solutions to overcome potential barriers.

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  • A Report on the Community Development Conference 2015

    Stansfield, John; Masih, Abishhek (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The Community Development Conference 2015 was an effort by the Department of Social Practice at Unitec and Community Development practitioners to bring together practitioners, academics and students to share their knowledge, research and stories about community development. Thirty-­‐five completed feedback forms were received - summary included.

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  • Communicating social change : politics and immigrants

    Cruickshank, Prue (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Immigration is a complex, dynamic global phenomenon which impacts irrevocably on both immigrants and the receiving society. Immigration policies, reflecting governments’ political and economic intentions, significantly influence successful immigration and settlement. Immigrants’ success in meeting governments’ and their own expectations are influenced by the political, economic, regulatory and social conditions of the host society they enter. Developing communication strategies to prepare a population for a change in immigration policies would be advantageous for social cohesion. However, the introduction of radical economic change intended to restructure business and society at the same time was not conducive to smooth, social immigrant integration. This paper explores the communication dimensions of an immigration policy set within the context of national political and economic restructuring. It does this by tracing the process and impact of the introduction of neo-liberal policies on New Zealand society without prior political debate. The economic and social consequences of neo-liberal reforms affected the reception and opportunities encountered by newly arrived business immigrants. To contextualise the discussion, the effects of neo-liberal policies on the New Zealand economy and society, including its immigrant communities, are traced from their inception in the 1980s through the 1990s. Introducing an economic and political change process which enables people to connect and participate, requires leaders who can articulate a vision to persuade people it is in their best interests to incorporate the change (Shockly-Zalabak, 2009). An opportunity for political debate on the impending neo-liberal changes arose during the 1994 New Zealand election campaign but was deliberately ignored (Jesson, 1999). An unexplained change in the social contract potentially creates a sense of betrayal and unfocused anger (D’Aprix, 1996). Subsequently, as the neo-liberal structural reforms were introduced, communities reacted in confusion, anger and scepticism.

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  • Introduction : representation and voice in a complex communication environment

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Representation is, of course, a central analytical concept with media, communication and cultural inquiry. The centrality of representation – of expression, mediation, institutional form and cultural negotiation - to issues of public debate and engagement, the quality of our media and to the measure of human agency and of our institutions is a notion that grounds our research and inquiry at Unitec. Representation is a central foundation of our research strategy and a central theme of this collection. A parallel interest and sensitivity to the place of voice within contemporary communicative practices provides a second foundational concept for our research activities. With an interest in voice we are focusing our attention on individuals, agencies and institutions and processes of ‘self’ and ‘collective’ representation that voicing implies, particularly in response to experiences or conditions of marginality (Couldry, 2010). Here, voice is understood as capacity and agency, in as much as it implies the communicative or representational act itself. Likewise, representation is an important way in which our voice can be heard. We feel strongly that how voices are intervening from the margins within contemporary New Zealand is a centrally important dynamic to be analysed and understood. We feel our Department is strongly placed to make significant contributions in this area and this collection stakes this claim.

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  • Preface. In Communication issues in Aotearoa New Zealand: a collection of research essays.

    Bossio, Diana (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aim of this collection is to showcase Unitec’s Department of Communication engagement with contemporary communications issues and this collection presents a rich and diverse response. From questions of race, multiculturalism and cultural politics, to case studies discussing questions of digital accessibility, governance and organisational communications, the research highlights a specifically New Zealand context, but is applicable to global understandings of communications.

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  • Race, racism in everyday communication in Aotearoa / New Zealand

    Revell, Elisabeth; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Kolesova, Elena (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This essay is based on theories of ‘new racism’, which explain how race and racism continue to play an integral role in our lives, but in subtle and often hidden ways. This approach informs the discussion in this essay that focuses on some of the issues that emerged from a critical collaborative autoethnographic project that explored how race is manifested in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand. The discussion, more specifically, draws on what we call here ‘conversational tact’ and its three sub-themes of ‘everyday racialised ethnic terms’, ‘the everyday racialised use of ethnic stereotypes’, and ‘everyday censorship and silence around race in conversation’. These themes have been chosen as the focus of this essay because they sit together under a larger theme that looks at the way in which people communicate race through their everyday patterns of speech and vocabulary in New Zealand and help us unmask ‘racial micro aggressions’ (DeAngelis, 2009; Sue et al, 2007).

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  • “Cool” Asia in a local context : East Asian popular culture in a New Zealand classroom

    Kolesova, Elena (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The central issue is not only what can every discipline learn from popular culture, but also how can popular culture become a successful tool of learning for different disciplines. The fact that it is such an attractive tool of learning for students does not make it easier to answer the question of what we, as teachers of popular culture, want our students to learn and understand when we use this powerful tool in our classroom. The course East Meets West was introduced in 2003 as a part of a suite of ‘global electives’ for all students enrolled in degree level programmes, e.g. Marketing, Business Management, Sports Management, Communication Studies etc at Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand. However, the majority taking the course were Bachelor of Arts [BA] students majoring in Japanese, Chinese or European languages. Some students were choosing to study Asian languages and, first of all, Japanese language to satisfy their obsession with East Asian popular culture. Japanese popular culture certainly played a key role, but interest in popular culture from other East Asian countries was equally present. Since 2010 the majority of students enrolled in this course were students enrolled in Communication Studies. Similarly to the BA students, their interest in this course was equally determined by their previous engagement with East Asian popular culture. The aim of the course has been to explore the influence of East Asian popular culture on the Western popular culture. The main emphasis was on visual popular culture, e.g. anime, film, advertising or street fashion. However, other genres or types of popular culture were also considered.

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  • The migrant and the media : maintaining cultural identity through ethnic media

    Noronha, Sandra; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Evidence shows that mainstream media in New Zealand does not fully address the communication needs of these ethnic groups nor does it represent them in a balanced way (Robie, 2009). This is where ethnic, migrant, diaspora media play an important and supporting role by providing an alternative to an increasingly homogenised mainstream media. For ethnic communities, access to such media gives them an avenue to understand more clearly issues affecting their community, a stronger sense of identity and social cohesion and a connection to a perceived transnational community. While there is an increasing concern that mainstream media fails to reflect migrant issues and concerns, a plethora of migrant media exists in parallel that helps fill this gap (Williamson and DeSouza, 2006). Auckland alone has a vibrant ethnic media scene with media spread across print, radio, and web. Its strong Pacific Islands population, for instance, has created a lively media scene with a strong radio and online media presence contributing to the creation of a distinctive cultural diasporic identity (Papoutsaki and Strickland, 2008). With this background, this essay explores the function of different migrant media in New Zealand drawing examples from across the board with a particular focus on Indian media. This includes traditional media (i.e. print, TV, magazine, and radio), and online media. In this, the traditional communication networks of ethnic community and religious associations and their use of web, films and events is also taken into consideration. By exploring the role, challenges and potential of ethnic media, this essay seeks to understand how these media represent the diverse voices of migrant groups, in addition to providing content relevant to their needs as migrants (i.e. content that counterbalances the mainstream host culture as it is represented in the mainstream media).

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  • Communication issues in Aotearoa New Zealand : a collection of research essays

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This edited volume introduces highlights of the academic interests and research activities of a number of staff at Unitec’s Department of Communication Studies, demonstrating the breadth and scope of the engagement of this academic collective with contemporary communication issues. Edited by Giles Dodson and Evangelia Papoutsaki, it is clear from the work that communication in Aotearoa New Zealand remains complex and continually under negotiation, as this country continues to be formed and reformed by processes of cultural encounter, by political and institutional change and by voices seeking to assert, to contest and to claim their presence – to represent and to be represented within contemporary New Zealand.

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  • Moving forward, keeping the past in front of us : Treaty settlements, conservation co-governance and communication.

    Dodson, Giles (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    At present there is well-established recognition in New Zealand of Māori and the Crown as constitutional partners to the Treaty of Waitangi1 and commitment to partnership is widely articulated in official and public discourses. This essay addresses the current issue of how developments in Treaty policy and new institutions arising from settlement of Treaty of Waitangi claims can inform the development of institutions of co-governance within national conservation policy. This discussion is contexualised by an examination of currently evolving marine conservation policy. The essay argues that communication, as a discipline conventionally outside policy – especially science dominated conservation policy – has much to offer policymakers as we seek to understand best practice partnership and co-governance arrangements emerging from Treaty settlements.

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  • Public relations in New Zealand - the missing pieces

    Trenwith, Lynne (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Modern practitioners of public relations in New Zealand work in diverse areas of communication (PRINZ, 2006, 2011) but the different areas of practice and the skills that each area employs have developed from the early years of public relations activity; from its origins in the two separate yet related strands of tikanga Māori and press agentry. The press agentry strand has been documented by Trenwith (2010) as the occupation emerged from its war time press agentry and propaganda practices to that of the more modern public relations practices. But missing from the New Zealand public relations history discourse is representation that addresses and integrates Māori and Pacific Island public relations ontological and epistemological assumptions.

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  • Repositioning the oral history interview : reciprocal peer interviewing within a transgenerational frame

    Donaghey, Sara (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This essay signals a departure from conventional models for the oral history interview to allow the participant voices to occupy a position of greater prominence in a collaborative process of co-creation. Reciprocal peer interviewing is an adaptation of focus group interviews; a technique that positions the narrators at the forefront of the interview process whilst the researcher takes on a secondary role as facilitator and observer. My research applies the reciprocal peer interview technique to explorations of lesbian identity and life experiences through oral testimony within a transgenerational frame. The interview lies at the heart of oral history; an intensely personal activity that provides recorded information in oral form (Fyfe and Manson, 2006). Indeed, analogies to dramatic representations are common in the literature, describing the interview as a performance during which two people interact across multiple channels of reception and transmission. Traditional interview modes place the researcher/interviewer at the forefront, engaging in an interrogatory dialogue with the narrator/interviewee. Despite an uneasy relationship with historians who at times, have viewed oral history as populist, partial and selective, one may argue that the recording of a life story is no different to an interview used as a mainstream data collection instrument in qualitative research commonly applied in the social sciences. Ultimately, one must adhere to the raison d’etre for historical study as stated by Thompson (1978, p 21) that “all history depends ultimately upon its social purpose.”

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  • New Zealand online : what’s happened to our Digital Strategy?

    Williams, Jocelyn (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The world started to talk about a “digital divide” in the mid-1990s. Governments had to grapple with its meaning and anticipate its ramifications (Maharey and Swain, 2000), although the swiftness with which the world was entering a new internet era from 1995 meant it was difficult to keep ahead with coherent strategy. Much has been achieved in regard to internet access in New Zealand since 2000. One reason is that we have a track record of relatively rapid adoption of electronic technologies (Doolin et al, 2005), and as predicted in diffusion of innovations theory (Rogers, 2003) greater penetration of the New Zealand market has been achieved for technological innovations such as smart phones. Large-scale household surveys show a gradual closing of the information and communication technologies [ICTs] access gap (Statistics New Zealand, 2009; Bascand, 2013). Yet it may surprise some people to know that digital inclusion remains an issue in New Zealand society, especially where school-aged children in poorer communities are concerned (Statistics New Zealand, 2006a). Although New Zealand is a developed nation that by many measures appears to enjoy a good standard of living, lack of economic prosperity across the nation as a whole is driving income disparity, and the 2006-2008 global recession has led to increasingly thinly spread public sector resources. Improved economic performance is a governmental priority, and in that context digital literacy - “the new forms of literacy required from the incorporation of digital technology in the structures, flows and embodied experiences of everyday life” (Goggin, 2008, p. 88) - is vital so that people can contribute to the economy. However, one fifth of New Zealand households, especially those in low socio-economic areas, remain without internet access at the time of writing (Bascand, 2013). This is a matter of concern in terms of the need to include as many skilled people in the workforce as possible, and to stimulate the economy through high-tech innovation so that it is less dependent on primary production and tourism, and more on “weightless exports” (The Committee for Auckland, 2012, p. 7). Currently “staggering talent gaps” (ibid) are being identified as cause for concern, especially a growing shortfall of IT skills that are needed to assist business to be more productive, flexible and profitable (ibid, p. 12-13). This essay traces the evolution of a digital strategy in New Zealand, explores reasons why a digital divide persists in spite of it, and invites the reader to consider the importance of the social context for ICTs, and social interaction that facilitates learning, at least as much as the technologies themselves.

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  • All the suffering on our backs : rugby, religion and redemption amid the ruins

    Cass, Philip (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    New Zealand’s All Black rugby team is a national icon, an affirmation of the manly, self-reliant and resilient virtues which New Zealanders like to think they possess. In times of national peril, economic uncertainty and disaster they remain a pillar of certainty and inspiration, present in almost every television news bulletin and daily newspaper. At other times the All Blacks – whether current players or not - have also provided the media with a frame of reference for explaining significant international events to New Zealand audiences. In 2011 the All Blacks were used prominently to report on the Christchurch earthquake and the much greater seismic devastation experienced in Japan. However, as the Rugby World Cup approached both New Zealand and international media also began to invest the performance of rugby players with a quasi-religious expectation that they would somehow provide catharsis and healing for the earthquake victims in New Zealand and Japan. In doing so they reflected processes that had occurred elsewhere, notably in New Orleans after Cyclone Katrina, the 1995 Rugby World Cup in South Africa and London after the July 2007 terrorist attacks. Rugby has been described as a religion in New Zealand. It is certainly an obsession. Located on the fringes of the north Antarctic and exercising little global economic, political or military influence, New Zealand constantly seeks to mark a space for itself on the world stage through sport. Despite the success of its sportsmen and women in a variety of competitions, rugby remains the central, if not the driving force, in New Zealand sport and in its quest for global recognition. New Zealand’s national team, the All Blacks, is freighted with all sorts of social, cultural and quasi-political expectations.

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  • Model demonstrates functional purpose of the nasal cycle

    White, DE; Bartley, J; Nates, RJ

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: Despite the occurrence of the nasal cycle being well documented, the functional purpose of this phenomenon is not well understood. This investigation seeks to better understand the physiological objective of the nasal cycle in terms of airway health through the use of a computational nasal air-conditioning model. Method: A new state-variable heat and water mass transfer model is developed to predict airway surface liquid (ASL) hydration status within each nasal airway. Nasal geometry, based on in-vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is used to apportion inter-nasal air flow. Results: The results demonstrate that the airway conducting the majority of the airflow also experiences a degree of ASL dehydration, as a consequence of undertaking the bulk of the heat and water mass transfer duties. In contrast, the reduced air conditioning demand within the other airway allows its ASL layer to remain sufficiently hydrated so as to support continuous mucociliary clearance. Conclusions: It is quantitatively demonstrated in this work how the nasal cycle enables the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting roles of air conditioning and the removal of entrapped contaminants through fluctuation in airflow partitioning between each airway.

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  • Retinal development and ommin pigment in the cranchiid squid Teuthowenia pellucida (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida)

    Evans, AB; Acosta, ML; Bolstad, K

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    The cranchiid Teuthowenia pellucida, like many deep-sea squid species, possesses large eyes that maximise light sensitivity in a nearly aphotic environment. To assess ontogenetic changes in the visual system, we conducted morphometric and histological analyses of the eyes using specimens from New Zealand collections. While the ratio between eye diameter and mantle length maintained a linear relationship throughout development, histological sections of the retina revealed that the outer photoreceptor layer became proportionally longer as the animal aged, coincident with a habitat shift into deeper, darker ocean strata. Other retinal layers maintained the same absolute thickness as was observed in paralarvae. Granules of the pigment ommin, normally located in the screening layer positioned at the base of the photoreceptors, were also observed at the outer end of the photoreceptor segments throughout the retina in young and mid-sized specimens. Early developmental stages of this species, dwelling in shallow waters, may therefore rely on migratory ommin to help shield photoreceptors from excess light and prevent over-stimulation. The oldest, deeper-dwelling specimens of T. pellucida examined had longer photoreceptors, and little or no migrated ommin was observed; we suggest therefore that short-term adaptive mechanisms for bright light conditions may be used primarily during epipelagic, early life stages in this species.

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  • Procurement of non-incremental sustainable technology innovations - the case of small entrepreneurial firms supplying New Zealand construction & building industry

    Staal, A; Tookey, J; Seadon, J; Mobach, M; Walhof, G


    Auckland University of Technology

    Motivation Traditionally, the construction industry in New Zealand and in other countries has seen a low productivity and a low track record for successful innovations (Fairweather, 2010). The industry also lags in sustainability (e.g. Nemry, 2008) when seen from a broader or lifecycle perspective. This has a negative impact on private and government spending, on quality and health/wellbeing, and on the environment. This paper posits that the construction industry needs non-incremental (disruptive or discontinuous, i.e. modular, architectural, system or radical) sustainable technology innovations to make drastic improvements in sustainability. Such innovations are often procured (acquired) and (co-) developed by small entrepreneurial firms thus introducing such innovations into the construction and building industry. However it is unclear exactly how entrepreneurial small firms procure non-incremental sustainable technology innovations. Knowledge gap from extant research Often entrepreneurial small firms from outside the industry or at the beginning of supply chains play an important role in procuring innovations (e.g. Baumol, 2002; Johnsen 2011; Gambatese, 2011, Pries, 1995, 2005). There is a wealth of literature on how large organisations procure their goods and services but it often remains unclear how small firms procure these (e.g. Hagelaar, 2014). There is Australian literature (e.g. Hardie, 2006; Hardie 2013) on small firms successfully introducing sustainable innovations in the construction industry. Likewise, there is a growing body of literature (e.g. Johnsen, 2011; Philips 2004) on how large organisations procure non-incremental innovations. There is some literature on non-incremental sustainable innovations in the construction industry (e.g. Hardie, 2013; Sheffer, 2010, 2013). There is research on innovation types in the construction industry (Slaughter, 2000, Hardie, 2006). Literature also suggests (e.g. Hardie, 2011) several barriers to adoption of innovations on a meso (industry) level and on a macro (systemic) level in the construction industry. Utterback (1994) suggested that such (infrequent) non-incremental innovations would trigger more frequent process and incremental innovations, and would hence deliver large benefits to stakeholders. Manley (2008) concluded that despite the importance of product innovation there is not much research within the construction industry. Small firms are not miniature versions of large firms (e.g. Torres & Julien, 2005) and small firm innovation and procurement processes will differ from those of larger firms. Processes are likely to be more informal, holistic, and centred round the firm owner although Meijaard (2004) suggested a wide variety of organisational structures within small firms including formal and complex structures. Entrepreneurial small firms are a small subset of small firms but realize growth and renewal (OECD, 2010). In general there is a research gap on how entrepreneurial small construction firms procure non-incremental sustainable technology innovations.

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