762 results for 1999

  • Diet of feral cats (Felis catus) in pastoral habitats of Canterbury, Otago and Southland : functional and numerical responses to rabbit availability

    Borkin, Kerry Maree (1999)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 63 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "April 1999." University of Otago department: Zoology. University of Otago Wildlife Management Report no. 105.

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  • He kupu tuku iho mo tenei reanga : Te ahua o te tuku korero

    Higgins, Rawinia Ruth (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    170 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies. "March 1999."

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  • Synthesis and characterisation of poly(acrylic acid) microspheres containing β-cyclodextrin

    Bibby, David C. (1999)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xviii, 160 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "February 1999"

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  • Supervision and the culture of general practice

    Wilson, Hamish John (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Supervision is a well-known and well-theorised activity in some professions where experienced practitioners contract to facilitate, guide or educate the novice. Supervision is uncommon in medicine, which has traditionally employed more didactic teaching processes. In the general practice community in New Zealand, practitioners use a variety of methods of professional maintenance, with educative mentoring or supervision being a recent innovation. In this form of supervision, general practitioners (GPs) discuss their work with an experienced supervisor, with one focus being to learn counselling or psychotherapy skills. This study examined the experiences of GPs who use supervision, with particular reference to how supervision impacts on their practice of medicine. The context for this inquiry included the background philosophical assumptions of the biomedical paradigm, current problems in clinical practice and the culture of general practice in New Zealand. The research used a qualitative methodology, with seven GP respondents being interviewed at length about their use of supervision. A focus group with four of the participants followed initial analysis of the individual interviews. Interviews and group discussion were analysed within a social constructivist paradigm. The respondents' stories of learning about supervision led to the construction of a collective story. This could be outlined under the four broad themes of dissonance and exploration, self-awareness and professional development, the supervised practice, and defining supervision in general practice. However, before these GPs could make effective use of supervision, they needed to work through a number of personal and cultural barriers. The findings of the research suggest that supervision is a powerful method of learning, being an embodied experience through the supervisor-doctor relationship. Some of these GPs used their supervisor to learn how to do psychotherapy in general practice. The supervisor also acted as sounding board for all the respondents to discuss other work issues, such as practice management and peer relationships. One outcome of regular supervision was validation about their work, contributing to a heightened sense of self in the work environment. Supervision facilitated a model of reflective learning that is relatively uncommon in medicine. This was achieved through rigorous attention to self-awareness, resulting in facilitated career development. In a supervised practice, the GP incorporates an increasing acuity for patients' psychological problems. There is an emphasis on the doctor-patient relationship, with awareness of the roles and boundaries around the GP’s work. Supervision was seen to be different to work in peer-groups or in personal psychotherapy, but there were similarities. The role of the supervisor was defined to include sub-roles of teacher, facilitator, analyst and evaluator. In this study there was invariably no form of summative evaluation. The results led to a definition of supervision in general practice. Studying these successful supervisor-doctor relationships gave unique insights into the barriers that prevent further utilisation of supervision or other forms of mentoring in general practice. These barriers include broad issues of the traditional epistemological assumptions of modern medicine. Having supervision appeared to have a major impact on the style of medical practice that is exhibited by these GPs. There are implications of these findings for both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. This research was grounded in a social constructivist paradigm that linked theory, research and clinical practice. From the evidence presented here, these practitioners have incorporated biomedicine into a wider medical model that offers a resolution to the current paradigmatic crisis of modern medicine.

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  • A functional analysis of coral tools from late prehistoric Moloka'i Island, Hawaii.

    Dickson, Hamish (1999)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    1.1 Research Orientation During the course of archaeological fieldwork conducted late in 1978, 425 artifacts relating to fishhook manufacture were recovered from site 38 on Moloka'i Island in the Hawaiian chain. Fishhook manufacturing artifacts include Porities sp coral and echinoid urchin spine abraders, basalt flakes, bone fishhook blanks and bone fishhook debitage. Artifacts deemed coral abraders (precise definition will be given in a latter section) were studied from this site and will be the focus of this dissertation. It is generally believed that coral abraders were used to manufacture fishhooks for the following reasons: 1) Coral artifacts have been found in close association with fishhook manufacture (Emory, Bonk and Sinoto and Sinoto, 1959, Allen, 1992; Suggs 1961; Kirch and Yen 1982 and Buck 1957: and many others). 2) Early ethnographic accounts recorded in the journals of Captain James Cook by Joseph banks (Endeavor botanist), describe native Pacific islanders manufacturing fishhooks using coral files (Hawkesworth, 1773). 3) Use-wear analysis by Allen (1992) indicates that a large number of these tools may have been used to manufacture fishhooks. This dissertation as two main aims: 1) To form a classification system (non-classificatory arrangement; after Dunnel, 1971) for the purpose of ascertaining a functional to coral tools in relation to fishhook manufacture. 2) To devise a standardised system for the measurement of attributes on coral abraders that may aid future functional studies . Chapter one will set the scene, giving details regarding the background of the site under investigation. A definition and basic description of coral tools will be provided along with a review of the literature regarding coral artifacts. Chapter two is divided into two parts. The first part involves a brief review of the literature on classification systems and typology’s. Also in the first section, a justification will be given as to why the particular classification system was used. The second half of chapter two will involve a justification of attributes chosen to form the classification system. The third chapter involves a description of the methods used in measuring attributes and why these attributes were measured in this manor. This will be followed with a detailed description of each artifact class. Each class description will be accompanied with possible functions. The last chapter will be brief, involving conclusions and suggestions for future research. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Feeding the lambs : the influence of Sunday Schools in the socialization of children in Otago and Southland, 1848-1901

    Keen, David Stuart (1999)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 250 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Hostile borders on historical landscapes : the placeless place of Andamanese culture

    Pandya, Vishvajit (1999)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper is an analysis of meanings attributed to contacts between Jarwas and non-Jarwas in the Andaman Islands. Unlike other Andaman tribal groups, the Jarwas are confined to a government-designated area of 765 square kilometres of forest reserve, which is only a fraction of their former tribal land. Since early colonial occupation, government parties have sought out Jarwas on the west coast of the island they inhabit, bringing them gifts to try to establish friendly relations. On the eastern side of Jarwa territory, on the other hand, the Jarwas raid settlements and occasionally kill settlers and police who venture into their territory. The paper addresses the issue of how the contact event on the eastern side is different in Jarwa eyes from what occurs on the western side. The boundaries are given meanings by the various outsiders and the Jarwas, and these meanings are not fixed. Although contact events are in tended to establish 'friendly' relations with 'hostile' Jarwas, no true relationship of trust and understanding has yet been established. This underlines the fact that meanings are bound by cultural, political and historical contexts.

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  • "Fouling the nest" : the conflict between the 'church party' and settler society during the New Zealand Wars, 1860-1865

    Grimshaw, Michael P (1999)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    328 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Theology and Religious Studies

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  • A voice of her own : Ethel Smyth and early feminist musicology

    Emerson, Helen Katrine (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 180 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Music.

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  • Conceptions of motherhood and how they affect the way surrogacy is viewed and regulated

    Ericsson, Deborah Nancy (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 99 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "25 March 1999"

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  • The use of topical tranexamic acid for the prevention of postextraction bleeding in patients on oral anticoagulants who are undergoing oral surgery, without modification of their anticoagulant regime

    Gibbs, Robert David (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: x, 77 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. Notes: "October 1999". Thesis (M. D. S.)--University of Otago, 1999. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Speech style in gendered communication

    Hannah, Annette (1999)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Dr Annette Hannah is a registered Psychologist in New Zealand and invites enquiries regarding this research: ahannahnz@gmail.com This research was further published in the Journal of Language and Social Psychology: Hannah A, & Murachver T. Gender and conversational style as predictors of Conversational behaviour. Vol 18, No2, June 1999, 153-174. Hannah A, & Murachver T. Gender Preferential Responses to Speech. Vol 26, No 3, Sept. 2007 274-290.

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  • Negotiating infant welfare : the Plunket Society in the interwar period

    Hickey, Maureen (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vi, 139 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves [134]-139.

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  • 'No room for luxuries' : aspects of life in a working-class New Zealand community in the 1930s

    Isaac, Penelope Sheila (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 166 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Big Norm - a principled pragmatist? : the origins and implementation of Norman Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies, 1959-1974

    Waite, James David Anthony (1999)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Preface: This essay aims to explore Norman Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies. It focuses on policy formulation and diplomatic process within the context of the 'moral and independent' foreign policy. The author does not aim to describe in detail the 1973 ICOJ case, that sought to end French atmospheric nuclear testing. Others have dealt with this event in detail and with great expertise. Instead the essay re-examines all of Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies, beginning in 1959 and ending with Kirk's death in August 1974. Kirk's policies continued in various forms after his death. Yet the strong and focused leadership that he provided in the field of disarmament and for humanitarian issues in general ended on 31 August 1974. The death of Kirk was a watershed for the New Zealand Labour Party. The man who dominated its leadership through two electoral defeats and one victory vanished from the political scene. Kirk's life as a mature politician constitutes an era in the history of New Zealand's anti-nuclear movement. His leadership deserves to be evaluated on its own terms.

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  • The effects of harvesting on the reproductive and population biology of the New Zealand Littleneck Clam (Austrovenus stutchbury) in Waitati Inlet

    Irwin, Craig Robert (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vi, 203 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "March 1999." University of Otago department: Marine Science.

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  • The impact of recent health legislation on health care ethics : the physiotherapy perspective

    Elkin, Sandra Ann (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    174 leaves :ill. ; 31 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "February 1999"

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  • Late Quaternary geology of Glenorchy district, Upper Lake Wakatipu

    Kober, Florian (1999)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 127 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • Health in late prehistoric Thailand

    Domett, Kathryn M. (1999)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xvii, 326 leaves :ill. (some col.), col. maps, form ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Wavefront estimation in astronomical imaging.

    Irwan, Roy (1999)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The challenge in building astronomical telescopes is to obtain the clearest possible image of a distant star, which should appear as a single point. Extended objects, such as galaxies and planets can be regarded as collections of points. However, turbulence in the atmosphere degrades any optical signal that passes through it. The optical effects of the atmospheric turbulence arise from random inhomogeneities in the temperature distribution of the atmosphere. As a consequence of these temperature inhomogeneities, the index of refraction distribution of the atmosphere is random. Plane waves striking the atmosphere from space objects acquire an aberration as they propagate through the atmosphere. The plane wave's surface of constant phase is no longer planar when intercepted by a,n a.stronornica.l telescope. The prnctica.l consequence of a.tmospheric turbulence is that resolution is generally limited by turbulence rather than by optical design and quality of a telescope. There are a number of approaches to solving this problem, ranging from an orbiting telescope (the Hubble Space Telescope), adaptive optics, and post detection processing. The latter approaches have applications to less expensive ground based telescopes and have been the subject of many years of research. Adaptive optics is a general term for optical components whose characteristics can be modified in real time so as to alter the phase of an incident optical wavefront. An adaptive optics system can be used to correct for atmospheric induced distortions. Before any corrections can be applied, however, some measurement must be made of the phase distortions. It is the aim of this study to estimate the degradation of the wavefronts phase. Two approaches to do so are presented. Firstly, through wavefront sensors, which many adaptive optics systems have been devised from. Among them the Shack-Hartmann sensor is the most commonly used. The sensor requires a subdivision of the receiving pupil by means of sub-apertures, wherein the lowestorder deformation of the wavefront phase is estimated. This linearizes the problem of phase retrieval to solving a linear system of equations. A new analysis is presented which differs from previously published work in the estimation of the noise inherent in the centroid calculation used in this sensor. This analysis is supported by computer simulations. Secondly, the nonlinear approach of phase retrieval is discussed. The problem becomes how to relate the phase and magnitude of the Fourier transform. It is thus necessary to estimate the phase distortion in the instrument solely from measurements made at the image plane of the telescope. The process of phase retrieval is then divided into two distinct steps. The expression for the covariance of the phase distortion using a Kolmogorov model for the turbulence is derived first. This covariance is then employed as part of a formal Bayesian estimate of the phase distortion. It is also shown that phase retrieval can be employed as a robust technique for estimating the wavefront distortion using a lenslet array. The results obtained compare favorably with the alternative approach of phase diversity. Furthermore, the introduction of prior information, in the form of statistical information of the distortion, is shown to considerably enhance the success of the phase retrieval especially for very low light levels. A comparative evaluation shows the superiority of phase retrieval to Shack-Hartmann sensing, only if the local maxima are overcome. The principal drawback of phase retrieval is the relatively long computing time required to find the solution when general-purposed computer is used.

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