1,015 results for 2001

  • Growth and movement of Blue Cod (Parapercis colias) in Paterson Inlet, Stewart Island, New Zealand

    Govier, Daniel (2001)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 142 leaves :ill., map ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 134-142. "December 2001." University of Otago department: Marine Science.

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  • Are New Zealand Treaty of Waitangi settlements achieving justice? : the Ngai Tahu settlement and the return of Pounamu (greenstone)

    Gibbs, Meredith (2001)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 332 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies. "30 September 2001."

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  • Reconstruction of the 01 February 1814 eruption of Mayon Volcano, Philippines

    Mirabueno, Maria Hannah Terbio (2001)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Mayan Volcano's eruption on 01 February 1814 is considered as the volcano's most violent eruption episode, devastating five towns in the southern slopes of the volcano and killing at least 1,200 people. The deposits of the 1814 eruption are mainly distributed on the southern slopes of the volcano. The primary volcanic succession consists of, from bottom to top, tephra fall deposit, lower ignimbrite, pyroclastic surge deposit and upper ignimbrite. Two post-eruption lahar units were also recognized in the field area. The tephra fall unit, although not observed in direct contact with any of the other primary deposits, was distinguished based on petrologic and geochemical similarities with the lower ignimbrite and pyroclastic surge deposit. The lower ignimbrite and the overlying pyroclastic surge deposit are both scoriaceous, and are similarly bombs-rich; the surge deposit is distinguished by its characteristically good sorting. In contrast, the upper ignimbrite contains abundant angular altered clasts derived from pre-eruption deposits. All the primary deposits are interpreted to have been derived from an eruption column that was generated by multiple explosive eruptions occurring in close succession. This column initially generated the tephra fall. Discrete phases of column collapse produced the succession of lower ignimbrite, pyroclastic surge deposit and upper ignimbrite. The wide dispersal, composition and textural characteristics of the pyroclastic surge indicate that it was generated by a discrete phase of an eruption column collapse. The upper ignimbrite is the deposit from a density current produced during the cessation of the eruption that was accompanied by partial collapse of the crater wall. The 1814 deposits are predominantly composed of basaltic andesite, with minor more acidic andesite. Petrographic texture and contact relationships, bimodal distribution of plagioclase, and variation in glass composition indicate mixing of two magmas. A geologic model for the 1814 eruption is proposed in which an intermediate andesite magma residing in a small, shallow chamber beneath Mayan was intruded by a comparably larger magma of basaltic andesite composition. The resulting magma mixing may have triggered the explosive eruption of 1814.

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  • Social construction, discourse and outdoor instruction assessment

    Chisholm, Hilary Anne (2001)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 199 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Physical Education. "March 2001."

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  • Perceptions of the Otago Central Rail Trail

    Kulczycki, Cory (2001)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 261 leaves : ill., map ; 30 cm

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  • Health and disease in the prehistoric Pacific Islands

    Buckley, Hallie R. (2001)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The main impetus of this research was to assess the role of infectious disease, particularly malaria, on the success of human settlement in the prehistoric Pacific Islands. A significant difference in the disease environments of the Pacific Islands is the presence of malaria in most of Melanesia and its absence in Polynesia. This research is the first attempt to assess the impact of malaria on the health of prehistoric Pacific Islanders. The materials used were two samples of human skeletal remains from different regions of the Pacific Islands; one from Taumako, an island in the malarial zone of the Solomon Islands, Melanesia and one from Tongatapu, the Kingdom of Tonga, Polynesia where malaria has always been absent. The objectives of this research were to record several different parameters of health and disease in these samples. Firstly, the demographic profile of each population was compiled to test whether the mortality rates of the Taumako people may have been affected by the presence of malaria. Secondly, non-specific indicators of growth disruption in dental material were recorded to assess whether levels of childhood stress were greater at Taumako. The stature of adults was also compared between Taumako and Tonga as a measure of the individual ability to achieve a genetic potential for growth. Finally, the skeletal indicators of iron deficiency anaemia and infectious disease were recorded to test whether the prevalence of disease differed and whether these differences may be attributed to malaria. The results of the analyses of these parameters of health and disease showed significantly higher prevalences of prenatal and childhood growth disturbance at Taumako compared to Tonga. The stature of adults was similar between the two regions but the range of heights was greater at Taumako. Similarly, a higher prevalence and more severe expression of iron-deficiency anaemia and significantly more proliferative skeletal lesions were found at Taumako. However, a significantly greater number of subadults were affected with postcranial proliferative lesions at Tonga than Taumako, although, the affected children were older at Tonga. The mortality rates of the two populations were similar, although males were more vulnerable to early death than females at Taumako. A differential diagnosis proposed that endemic yaws was the most likely infectious disease causing the skeletal lesions at Taumako; while at Tonga a more non-specific pattern of disease was proposed. The possibility of multiple causes for the skeletal lesions was also proposed for some individuals at both sites. The discussion of the results found they were consistent with the premise that the presence of malaria in Melanesia may have caused chronic growth disturbance and exacerbated the expression of anaemia and infectious disease in prehistory. However, it is also argued that differences in diet may have had an equally strong role in the observed patterns of health and disease. In conclusion, the results of this research did not unequivocally demonstrate the role of malaria on the health of prehistoric populations. However, this study is an initial step in the investigation of the impact of malaria on human populations, while not excluding other factors such as diet.

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  • The declaration of inconsistency with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990

    Curran , Chris (2001)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Section 2(4) of the Criminal Justice Amendment Act (No 2) 1999 is incompatible with the cardinal tenets of a liberal democracy. This Court would be compromising its judicial function if it did not alert Parliament in the strongest possible manner to the constitutional privation of this provision. The arrival of the declaration of inconsistency in Moonen v Film and Literature Board of Review was quite remarkable. There was nothing in the legislative history nor the terms of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 (NZBORA) that explicitly furnished the courts with the jurisdiction to declare that certain statutory limitations of rights are inconsistent with the Act. Concerns were immediately raised about the feasibility and constitutional propriety of the new remedy. The Court of Appeal's traditionally liberal approach to the NZBORA appeared to have led it into error. It will be argued in this paper, however, that the declaration is both a legitimate and practical development. The new remedy promises to augment the democratic processes protecting human rights, facilitate transnational and domestic institutional dialogues on the nature of such rights, and promote a climate of rights-based justification and accountability for state action. Chapter 1 inquires into the significance of the declaration. The nature of the declaration is outlined, and its current legal status considered. The impact of the declaration is then briefly traversed in terms of its implications for the law of remedies, the NZBORA, the constitution, and New Zealand jurisprudence. Chapter 2 then questions whether the declaration is truly a surprising development. In this regard, the legal pedigree of the declaration, the context of expanding NZBORA remedies and the UK statutory analogue are all discussed. Chapter 3 begins the analysis of the legitimacy of the declaration. The inquiry first assesses the fit between the declaration and the broader NZBORA framework. The constitutional relationship between Parliament and the courts then provides a major yardstick in this legitimacy analysis. Democratic objections to the declaration and the possible benefits of a new constitutional order are discussed. Finally, the ramifications of the declaration for the international human rights system are assessed. Chapter 4 concludes the paper by considering the methodology of declaration decision-making. It looks to Canada for guidance in appraising the legitimacy and competency of such decisions, and discerns lessons regarding the employment of appropriate legal and procedural methods in this regard. The final procedural issue discussed is the question of standing. The two dominant standing standards are thus evaluated against the requirements of declaration decisionmaking and the nature of the declaration itself.

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  • Pushing past the confines of femininity : music for women in Dunedin, 1907-1950 : a vehicle for agency, recognition and social connections

    Deuchrass, Andrea (2001)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Music is a form of self-expression, community or national culture, political voice and ethnic identity, among many other things. This dissertation examines the way that music can be a central influence to life for women, in a social structure encompassing the factors of gender and femininity, socio-economics and to a lesser extent, ethnicity. Music can provide a livelihood, form of (small) income and a way of making social connections in a sphere that can function both in and out of the home. It is also an activity where people often cross social boundaries. I have chosen to examine the extent to which music gave women agency, social acceptance and enjoyment in the Otago district from 1907 to 1950.

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  • Using academic research methodologies to improve the quality of teaching: A case study

    McEwan, W. (2001)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A contract for the European Space Agency (ESA) was carried out by the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, to study the performance of the protocols (particularly TCP/IP) used within the ESA funded CODE satellite communication system (Fairhurst, Ord et al. 1993; Fairhurst, McEwan, et al. 1993; Fairhurst, et al. 1994). As part of that study, data was collected from the routers connected to the VSAT terminal equipment using the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). The analysis of data gathered from that experiment, and the later comparison of some of the methodologies used, formed part of a M.Sc. Engineering by research thesis published by the author of this paper (2000). The present paper does not particularly concern itself with the results of the above research. Rather, it is intended to illustrate that the experimental methodologies, devised for a leading academic research project undertaken at postgraduate level, can at times be later used to improve the quality of teaching and research at degree level and below. This is contrary to the common but ill-conceived notion that such academic research is overly esoteric and thus somehow unrelated and of no benefit to the more down-to-earth realities of general teaching. Within this paper some of the practical details of the methodology used in the CODE experiment will be described. This will include the hardware internetwork configurations used during both the “live” satellite data communication link (an expensive resource) and a similar configuration using a “Satellite Link Simulator (SLS)” during the majority time when the live link was unavailable. Following the model of the above research, the School of Computing at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) has recently begun work on the creation of an in-house data communications research and teaching laboratory. Although this is in its early stages of formation this presentation will show that parts of its design are derived directly from the above CODE experiments. In addition, some software simulations used in the CODE experiments will be briefly described along with our plans for using similar software simulations in student research project work.

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  • Health assessment and its relationship to nursing practice in New Zealand

    Milligan, K.; Neville, S. (2001)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Health assessment has been an integral component of nursing education in Australia for over a decade. New Zealand has only recently embarked down this path and might benefit from the Australian experience. This article will discuss health assessment in the context of three issues currently topical in nursing in New Zealand. The issues are annual registration based on evidence of competence to practice, a review of undergraduate curricula, and the development of nurse practitioner/advanced nurse practitioner roles. The meaning of the concept ‘health assessment’ is also clarified in order to provide consistency as new initiatives in nursing are currently being developed.

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  • What do pigs and chickens have to do with eCommerce

    Nesbit, T. (2001)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In a world where more organisations are embracing eCommerce or eBusiness or eSomethingelse, there are an increasing number of eFailures as well. This paper looks at what it means to be successful in eCommerce and in particular the management skills that are needed for eCommerce organisations to be innovative and successful. The findings are based on a review of literature and the interview of a senior manager in an eCommerce organisation in New Zealand, and will be able to be used as the basis for a questionnaire to be distributed to a wider sample of organisations. The paper concludes by drawing a parallel between our understanding of the nature of pigs and chickens, and the characteristics of successful eCommerce organisations.

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  • Performance evaluation and capacity planning of corporate networks: a pilot study of methodologies and trends

    Asgarkhani, M.; Ward, B.; Kennedy, D. (2001)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    During the past few years we have witnessed a staggering growth in computer networks. Internet and digital business have had a profound effect on our day-to-day lives. This paper discusses our findings in regards to the challenges that IT departments have had to face - in particular, that of ongoing network performance evaluation and capacity planning. Our findings are the result of a pilot study that was conducted within a number of Christchurch based organisations. Issues such as user involvement, service level agreements, reactive or proactive planning have been addressed, as have tools, techniques and methodologies.

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  • Patterns: lust for glory

    Wieck, M. (2001)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Pattern frameworks have emerged as a powerful if not yet pervasive tool for the continuous improvement of software authorship, teaching, business administration and building design. The concept of somehow storing proven solutions to repeating problems in a readily-retrievable form has enormous appeal to professionals in all walks of life. While there have emerged some excellent templates for the creation of effective patterns there are a number of alternatives that each offer something to attract different pattern users. This paper reviews those observed so far, considers their features and attempts to recommend a preferred version or versions in the light of developed criteria.

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  • The X files - an XML Xperience

    Kennedy, D.; Lance, M. (2001)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    XML – eXtensible Markup Language. A way to markup a document for content. A standard for data interchange that is being used for B2B transactions. XML is designed for use with data-centric documents. Williams et al, 2000 describe a method for mapping a RDBMS structure to an XML DTD. A non-trivial realworld example was selected, that of course outlines. A RDBMS was designed for course outlines and the structure mapped to a DTD. The DTD plus a sample document was initially validated using Internet Explorer. It was further checked using an on-line validator. The DTD was subsequently revised in line with guidelines for good XML.

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  • Responses to censorship issues at Auckland Public Library 1920-1940

    Walker, Pauline Jean (2001)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This report examines how historical responses to censorship issues have influenced the development of contemporary intellectual freedom ideology through an analysis of censorship challenges and responses at Auckland Public Library during the years 1920-1940. Sociological theories related to the development of public libraries and to the development of librarianship as a profession are considered. The Remarque case of 1929 is identified as a pivotal moment in the development of contemporary intellectual freedom ideology among New Zealand librarians. Three key conclusions are made. Some librarians in New Zealand during the 1920s and 1930s saw censorship as part of their role. There was tension between a public expectation that entertaining fiction should be provided by the public library and the librarian's belief that the public library's primary purpose was education and cultural advancement. Although there was some opposition to librarians as censors, New Zealand librarianship had not yet advanced towards a definite understanding that the public library should be for all. This is evidence that New Zealand librarianship was developing in much the same way as its British and American counterparts, who at this time were also negotiating the librarian's role in selection and censorship issues.

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  • Where Should the Focus be in the Aftermath of Parental Separation: Children's Rights and Interests, or Parental Responsibility/Rights?

    Tapp, Pauline; Taylor, Nicola (2001)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    A study evaluates legal framework governing guardianship, custody and access arrangements for children in United Kingdom and Australia, together with the most recent research on the impact of parental separation on children. In England and Australia, legislation is used to educate parents to accept the importance for the child's well-being of settling custody and access disputes and continuing to co-operate as parents after separation.

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  • Whose "Special Treatment"? Heterosexism and the Problems with Liberalism

    Brickell, Chris (2001)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This article examines the circulation of heterosexist positions within several recent New Zealand media texts. It argues that a recent form of discourse engages liberal language and assumptions in ways that support the privileged position of heterosexuality and the marginalization of homosexuality. The examples given highlight not only the tenor of some recent representations of homosexuality, but also some problems within liberalism. Most notable of these are liberalism's individualism and its failure to recognize the systemic nature of hierarchical power relationships and the constituting of lesbian and gay subjectivities within these relationships. These problems allow liberalism to play an active part in processes of domination and subordination.

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  • Is Probation Work Social Work?

    Gibbs, Anita; King, Denise (2001)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This article seeks to ask the question: Is probation work social work? It arises from the authors' involvement with UK and NZ probation services over the last 16 years and from conversations with probation staff in New Zealand, who, in the main, believe in a social work value and skill base for probation. Yet, when one considers the shifts in aims, philosophies and practices of probation work in New Zealand, from altruistic and benevolent origins, to current correctional and authoritarian auspices, it is sometimes hard to see what social work has to offer. This piece, in promoting a debate on this issue, will explore key aspects of probation's traditional alliance to social work, how things have changed, what probation staff currently think and some key questions for future dialogue and research.

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  • Effects of constant incubation regimes on eggs and hatchlings of the egg-laying skink, Oligosoma suteri

    Hare, Kelly Maree (2001)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The conditions under which reptilian eggs are incubated affect survival probability and physiological attributes of the progeny. The egg-laying skink, Oligosoma suteri, is the only endemic oviparous lizard in New Zealand. No controlled laboratory incubation had previously been undertaken, and thus no information was available on the requirements for successful captive incubation. I studied the effects of incubation regime on the eggs and hatchlings of O. suteri to four months of age. Oligosoma suteri eggs (n = 174) were randomly distributed among three constant incubation temperatures (18°C, 22°C and 26°C) and two water potentials (-120 kPa and -270 kPa). Hatching success and hatchling survival were greatest at 22°C and 26°C, with hatchlings from 18°C incubation suffering from physical abnormalities. Incubation regime and maternal influence did not affect sex of individuals, with equal sex ratios occurring from each incubation treatment. Hatchlings from the 22°C and -120 kPa incubation treatments were larger, for most measurements, and warmer incubation temperatures resulted in increased growth rates. Juveniles from 22°C and 26°C and individuals with greater mass per unit length (condition index) sprinted faster over 0.25 m. Sprint speed was positively correlated with ambient temperature. At four months of age sprint speed decreased in 18°C individuals and individuals incubated at 26°C and -270 kPa compared to their performance at one month. The results suggest that the most successful captive incubation regime for O. suteri is 22°C and -120 kPa. This study also shows that temperature-dependent sex determination does not occur in O. suteri, but that fitness traits are influenced by incubation temperature.

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  • Urban Maori art : the third generation of contemporary Maori artists : identity and identification

    Rennie, Kirsten (2001)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Kia u ki tou kawai tupuna, kia matauria ai, i ahu mai !we i hea anga ana koe ko hea Trace out your ancestral stem, so that it may be known where you come from and in which direction you are going. The intention of this thesis is to examine and interpret the artistic careers and practice of University of Auckland Bachelor of Fine Arts graduates Lisa Reihana (1987), Brett Graham (1989), and Michael Parekowhai (1990), and University of Canterbury Bachelor of Fine Arts graduates Shane Cotton (1989) and Peter Robinson (1989). These urban artists are from a third generation of contemporary Maori artists, and they have been selected for this study because they represent a phenomenon within the New Zealand arts establishment. Graduating within three years of one another, they have instantly and successfully mapped out their artistic careers, rapidly rising in status nationally, and internationally, over the past decade. An examination of how contemporary Maori art has been defined by Maori and Pakeha critics and artists, and who is legitimised as Maori artists, presented as the debate between an essentialist and a post-modern, post-colonial argument, frames the context for this survey of identity and identification. The thesis investigates a contemporary Maori art movement: presenting a whanau of artists who form an artistic and educational support network of contemporaries, that whakapapa back to the Tovey generation - the kaumatua artists, influential in the work of Shane Cotton (Ngati Hine, Nga Puhi), Brett Graham (Ngati Koroki Kahukura), Michael Parekowhai (Nga-Ariki/Te Aitanga, Rongowhakaata) Lisa Reihana (Ngati Hine, Nga Puhi, Ngai Tu), and Peter Robinson (Kai Tahu). The artistic whanau now includes Cotton, Graham, Parekowhai, Reihana and Robinson who in turn influence and support their third generation peers, subsequently informing the artistic practice of the fourth generation of contemporary Maori artists, and forming a vital link in the continuation and development of the contemporary Maori art movement. The sesquicentenary of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1990 raised the question, once again, of how we identify as a nation, specifically, is there a New Zealand bicultural identity? The historically familiar focus on forming a partnership between the tangata whenua and Pakeha continued to be of importance for the nation as it approached the end of the millenium. The issue for New Zealand, as a country populated by a diverse range of migrant and locally born peoples, more recently, has become less concerned with 'creating' a bicultural identity and more interested in visually representing a multicultural nation. The last decade of the second millenium (1990 - 2000), is the main focus of this study because each one of the five artists profiled is conscious of speaking between two cultures, and they utilise their artistic works as the vehicle through which to investigate their Maoritanga and their bicultural reality. In a global climate of an increased awareness involving the rights of indigenous peoples, the third generation of contemporary urban Maori artists, the thesis will argue, became cultural ambassadors both nationally and internationally, their work an institutionally acceptable bicultural fusion of Pakeha and Maori concerns. The easy facility with which they negotiate between these two worlds makes them a pivotal generation in any study of contemporary Maori art. This thesis aims to reveal the changing and sometimes controversial face of contemporary Maori art, establishing the necessity for this change, revealing where the artists position themselves as a result of their geographical location within New Zealand, and in terms of their own connection to their Maori heritage and knowledge of their whakapapa, investigating issues of identity and identification.

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