1,544 results for 2004

  • The Carich Affair: Picking up the "pieces" (students) and moving on

    McCarthy, C.; Roberton, G.; Jull, C.; Potgieter, C. (2004)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In recent years Private Training Enterprises (PTEs) started teaching diploma programmes at levels 5 and 6 in full competition with Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITP). ITPs became increasingly concerned about the ability of PTE students to pathway into higher level ITP programmes, so as to continue with their studies. The National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) had done considerable work to map the unit standards contained in the national diplomas to their qualifications and this exercise drew into question the perceived value of the PTE levels 5 and 6 diplomas from the perspective of ITPs (Ross & Roberton, 2003). In the event, these concerns became less relevant when a major player in the PTE domain collapsed. In October 2003 Carich were forced to close business down and suddenly the future of their students, including a major cohort from the international market, was in serious jeopardy. The New Zealand government requested higher education institutions to rescue students, recognizing the negative impact that the collapse of Carich would have on students. They also coordinated the re-assignment of students to institutions who volunteered to help. This paper is written as an opinion piece to explain how Wintec and CPIT handled the situation, which occurred at an extremely busy time of the year for ITPs. It discusses the associated problems, the benefits that accrued as a result of the successful rescue operation, and lessons learned from the experience.

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  • The use of yeasts and moulds as sensing elements in biosensors

    Baronian, K. H. R. (2004)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Whole cell biosensors are able to provide information that sensors based on single and multiple types of molecules are unable to do. For example broad-spectrum catabolite analysis, cell toxicity and genotoxicity are best detected in the context of a functioning cell. Most whole cell sensors have used bacterial cells as the sensing element. Fungal cells, however, can provide all of the advantages bacterial cells offer but in addition they can provide information that is more relevant to other eukaryote organisms. These cells are easy to cultivate, manipulate for sensor configurations and are amenable to a wide range of transducer methodologies. An overview of the use of yeast and filamentous fungi as the sensing element of some biosensors is presented here.

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  • The meaning of effective education for critical care nursing practice: a thematic analysis

    Hardcastle, J. E. (2004)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Continuing education and practice development are integral components of specialist nursing practice in environments such as intensive and critical care. Previous studies have examined the ‘effectiveness’ of various approaches to teaching and learning in critical care, yet few have considered how effective education affects the relationship between education and practice development. Using thematic analysis, this study explored the phenomenon of effective education (for critical care nursing practice) by asking: What does effective education for critical care nursing practice mean to nurses currently practising in the specialty? Eighty eight critical care nurses from the South Island of New Zealand provided written descriptions of what effective education for critical care nursing practice meant to them. Descriptive statements were analysed to reveal constituents, themes and essences of meaning. Four core themes of personal quality, practice quality, the learning process and learning needs emerged. Appropriateness or relevance for individual learning needs is further identified as an essential theme within the meaning of effective education for critical care nursing practice. Shared experiences of the phenomenon are made explicit and discussed with reference to education and practice development in the specialty. The study results lend support to education that focuses on individual learning needs, and identifies work based learning as a potential strategy for learning and practice development in critical care nursing.

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  • A history of avalanche accidents in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Irwin, D.; Owens, I. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is based on a study for the New Zealand Mountain Safety Council which investigated the circumstances contributing to the deaths of 128 people in avalanches between 1863 and 1999. The study identified a trend of high fatalities during European settlement followed by a lull in fatalities early last century and then an increase in recent decades similar to other recently colonized countries. Similar to other studies, most victims were in their twenties and shift from work-to recreation-based activities has occurred from a century ago to recent times. Comparison with other studies of more specific activities involved in recent decades showed that alpine climbing, people on training courses and in area skiers and patrollers were over-represented while out of area ski/boarders and snowmobilers were under-represented. The geographic distribution of fatalities is concentrated in the South Island reflecting the preponderance of terrain for climbing and skiing.

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  • The joy of the X: the design of an XML system

    Kennedy, D. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The two main uses of XML are data exchange and as a central source that can be extracted and displayed in multiple ways. This paper describes the design and development of an XML based system for course outlines that uses XML for data exchange and as a central repository. The central repository is constructed from a number of base XML documents that have been extracted from various disparate sources. The central repository is used to produce a range of different outputs in different formats. The design considerations, for the system, the schema and the XSL, are discussed.

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  • Where are they now? Making the transition - three years on

    McCarthy, C. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    366 Where are they now? Making the Transition - Three Years On. Three years ago, the author presented a paper on a pilot project for senior high school students (McCarthy 2002) that provided a programme for transition to tertiary study in a vocational institution in preparation for a career in information and communications technology. As a result of this project, CPIT believed it had “captured” a potential market of students better prepared to handle the demands of tertiary study. Those students appeared better informed as to their options and more able to make informed choices and it was thought they might prove to be better equipped to survive in tertiary study. The initial project has since initiated a great deal of interest within other Technical Institutes both here in New Zealand and, at least one overseas institution, and has also spawned several successors, including a full-scale ICT-orientated senior high school – unique in New Zealand. This paper re-examines the pilot scheme, and its successors, and follows the relevant tertiary experiences of the students involved in the past three years.

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  • Differing preceptions of knowledge management: a New Zealand context

    Nesbit. T. (2004)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Jolliffe and Nesbit (2002) in an exploratory study reviewed a number of pieces of literature relating to knowledge management. As a consequence of this literature review two knowledge workers (from quite different backgrounds) were asked to indicate their level of agreement with a number of statements relating to knowledge management. The purpose of this paper is to survey a much wider sample of knowledge workers in an attempt to try and identify the factors that lead different groups of knowledge workers to have different perceptions about what knowledge management is. Paper presented at the Third International Conference on Knowledge, Culture and Change in Organisations, Bayview Beach Resort, Penang, Malaysia, 11-14 August 2003

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  • Serving up server side programming

    Nesbit, T.; Raizis, R. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper explores what content should be focussed on in the teaching of a level 7 server side programming course (covering PHP) that is part of the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) and the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce (Grad Dip eCommerce) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT). Opinions were sought from members of a variety of PHP user groups about the importance of various topics that could be included in such a course. The project reports of students from both BICT and Grad Dip eCommerce who had completed their major projects using PHP were analysed, to determine which content in the course was the most useful for their projects. The outcome of the research includes some recommendations for increased coverage of some topics in the course under review, and the possibility of changing one of the other courses in the Grad Dip eCommerce from being strongly recommended to being compulsory. The findings of this research will be of use to CPIT and other institutions that are already teaching or are contemplating teaching web-programming courses using PHP at this level.

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  • Teaching with a unit testing framework

    Lance, M. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper analyses element usage in a ‘real world’ XSLT application. A subset of core XSLT elements is identified and the reasons why these particular elements are useful is discussed. Teachers of XSLT may need to modify their introductory examples to cover what is actually needed in larger projects.

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  • Encouraging student retention: a study of student retention practices

    McCarthy, C. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Tinto (2002) asks what would it mean for institutions to take student retention seriously? For CPIT, it took the harsh realities of budgeting EFTS for 2004. We had always seen it as an adult student problem – the students were adults: if they chose to leave it was their business. Now, at budget preparation time, when we saw the retention of our 2003 mid-year intake was 60%, we realised it wasn’t a student problem – it was our problem. We had found what it would mean to take student retention seriously.

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  • The impact of effective IT systems management on end-user productivity: IT academics have their say

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines the use of technology partnership agreements (TPAs) and service level agreements (SLAs) for the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, from the perspective of a group of academics involved in the teaching of information and communication technology (ICT) in the Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) sector in New Zealand. Also examined in the paper are the use of cost centres and profit centres for measuring the financial performance of internal IT departments. This paper is part of ongoing research into the management of the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, with future research likely to include the perspectives of a wide grouping of those in IT management roles in the public sector; a group of people in IT management roles in the ITP and wider tertiary education sector; those teaching in non-ICT subject areas in the ITP sector and a cross section of practitioners in the IT Industry.

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  • A virtual solution to a real problem: Vmware in the classroom

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Over the past few years we have witnessed rapid advancements in ICT, which in turn has led, in the industry, to a staggering growth in the number and diversity of computer and networking solutions. As a result, academic institutions and professional training organizations face serious challenges in exposing students to many different computing environments while making efficient use of limited resources. To put it bluntly, how do we easily provide people with the practical experience of working with different operating systems, server applications, switches and routers? For a number of years, tutors at the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) have been using VMWare for the teaching of Microsoft, Linux, Netware and other operating systems as well as various associated technologies. The use of VMWare allows students to complete exercises, laboratory work and practical projects involving multiple servers in multiple networks without having to leave the physical confines of a single computer. While William McEwan (2002) documents the use of virtual machines, its origins and uses in the teaching of Unix and Linux courses, this paper extends this to other operating systems and moreover shifts the focus to the supporting infrastructure required in order to extract the maximum benefit from this virtualisation of machines, devices and storage media. This paper discusses one response to the dilemma of needing to expose students to a range of rapidly evolving computing technologies while ensuring that costs are kept low and that the supporting infrastructure is reliable, robust and not easily compromised in one way or another: in short, a solution that delivers to students and staff alike, a safe, scalable and flexible learning environment.

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  • NESB students - COPing with BICT

    Nesbit, T.; Isitt, S. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As increasing numbers of Non English Speaking Background (NESB) students apply to enrol in information and communication technology (ICT) degree programmes in New Zealand, there are many issues that are arising relating to the entry requirements for these students. Many students far exceed the academic entry requirements, and narrowly fail to meet the English language requirements for entry but could well be capable of success, whereas other students who only just meet both the academic and English language requirements may have low rates of success. This paper describes how Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) introduced a Foundation Programme for NESB students who meet the academic entry requirements for the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) degree, but narrowly miss the English language entry requirements, in such a way that still allows the students to complete the BICT degree in 3 years. The success rates of the first group of students to complete this foundation programme as they move further into the BICT degree point to this move being a successful one. The results of this research will be of significant use to CPIT and other institutions looking for alternative pathways into their degree programmes for NESB students.

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  • The case for a national degree: if not why not and what next?

    Corich, S.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper revisits the case for a national computing degree and attempts to identify a way forward that might prove acceptable to all the institutes aligning themselves with the national Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ). The concept of a national computing degree has been around for some time and has been an issue for debate among NACCQ membership since shortly after the introduction of the National Diploma in Business Computing in 1986. Until now, the reaction of member institutes to a national computing degree concept has ranged from warm enthusiasm to disinterested observer. This paper outlines previous efforts made to gain support for a national degree concept and investigates the perceived barriers to the adoption of such a proposal from the point of view of academic management and computing practitioners. The paper investigates a number of options, which focus on first year degree study activities, and that could prove acceptable to most interested parties. These options include identification and delivery of common core papers and the introduction of an “Advanced Standing” concept where institutes recognise a body work as being equivalent to first year degree study without the need for formal cross crediting. The paper aims at identifying an approach that will address the concerns of member institutes and provide a pathway for students that is accepted by the majority of institutes.

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  • Improved shortest path algorithms for nearly acyclic graphs

    Saunders, Shane (2004)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Dijkstra's algorithm solves the single-source shortest path problem on any directed graph in O(m+nlogn) worst-case time when a Fibonacci heap is used as the frontier set data structure. Here n is the number of vertices and m is the number of edges in the graph. If the graph is nearly acyclic, then other algorithms can achieve a time complexity lower than that of Dijkstra's algorithm. Abuaiadh and Kingston gave a single source shortest path algorithm for nearly acyclic graphs with O(m + nlogt) worst-case time complexity, where the new parameter t is the number of delete-min operations performed in priority queue manipulation. For nearly acyclic graphs, the value of t is expected to be small, allowing the algorithm to outperform Dijkstra's algorithm. Takaoka, using a different definition for acyclicity, gave an algorithm with 0 ( m + n log k) worstcase time complexity. In this algorithm, the new parameter k is the maximum cardinality of the strongly connected components in the graph. This thesis presents several new shortest path algorithms that define trigger vertices, from which efficient computation of shortest paths through underlying acyclic structures in the graph is possible. Various definitions for trigger vertices are considered. One definition decomposes a graph into a unique set of acyclic structures, where each single trigger vertex dominates a single corresponding acyclic structure. This acyclic decomposition can be computed in O(m) time, thus allowing the single source problem to be solved in 0 ( m + r log r) worst-case time, where r is the resulting number of trigger vertices in the graph. For nearly acyclic graphs, the value of r is small and single-source can be solved in close to O(m) worst-case time. It is possible to define both monodirectional and bidirectional variants of this acyclic decomposition. This thesis also presents decompositions in which multiple trigger vertices dominate a single acyclic structure. The trigger vertices of such decompositions constitute feedback vertex sets. If trigger vertices are defined as a set of precomputed feedback vertices, then the all-pairs shortest path problem can be solved in O(mn + nr2 ) worst-case time. This allows all-pairs to be solved in O(mn) worst-case time when a feedback vertex set smaller than the square root of the number of edges is known. For suitable graph types, these new algorithms offer an improvement on the time complexity of previous algorithms.

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  • Hollow-core floor slab performance following a severe earthquake.

    Matthews, Jeffrey (2004)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Hollow-core floor slabs are the dominant flooring systems used in New Zealand since the 1980's. This study experimentally investigates the seismic performance of precast hollow-core floors including three-dimensional effects of an entire floor system within a two-way moment resisting frame. In order to experimentally assess the seismic perfo1mance of a large super-assemblage a new type of self-equilibrating loading frame was designed and built. A full-scale super-assemblage based on a multi-storey prototype was constructed and tested under quasi-static cyclic loading. The capacity designed precast concrete frame perf01med very well but the performance of the floor itself was quite poor. Incipient failure of the precast floor occurred at an interstorey drift of 1.9 percent, while complete collapse of the floor occurred at a drift of 2.5 percent. A rainflow counting method is developed to enable the amount of beam elongation to be predicted during an earthquake. This is particularly impmiant in determining the required seating length for the precast hollow-core flooring units. Based on the results of this investigation new connection (seating) details are proposed for attaching the hollow-core units to the supporting beams to try to improve the performance of the hollow-core units.

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  • Engineering geological investigation of the Lake Coleridge rock avalanche deposits, inland Canterbury

    Lee, Jenny Alice (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Lake Coleridge Rock Avalanche Deposits (LCRADs) are located on Ryton Station in the middle Rakaia Valley, approximately 80 km west of Christchurch. Torlesse Supergroup greywacke is the basement material and has been significantly influenced by both active tectonics and glaciation. Both glacial and post-glacial processes have produced large volumes of material which blanket the bedrock on slopes and in the valley floors. The LCRADs were part of a regional study of rock avalanches by WHITEHOUSE (1981, 1983) and WHITEHOUSE and GRIFFITHS (1983), and a single rock avalanche event was recognised with a weathering rind age of 120 years B.P. that was later modified to 150 ± 40 years B.P. The present study has refined details of both the age and the sequence of events at the site, by identifying three separate rock avalanche deposits (termed the LCRA1, LCRA2 and LCRA3 deposits), which are all sourced from near the summit of Carriage Drive. The LCRA1 deposit is lobate in shape and had an estimated original deposit volume of 12.5 x 10⁶ m³, although erosion by the Ryton River has reduced the present day debris volume to 5.1 x 10⁶ m³. An optically stimulated luminescence date taken from sandy loess immediately beneath the LCRA1 deposit provided a maximum age for the rock avalanche event of 9,720 ± 750 years B.P., which is believed to be realistic given that this is shortly after the retreat of Acheron 3 ice from this part of the valley. Emplacement of rock avalanche material into an ancestral Ryton riverbed created a natural dam with a ~17 M m³ lake upstream. The river is thought to have created a natural spillway over the dam structure at ~557 m (a.s.l), and to have existed for a number of years before any significant downcutting occurred. Although a triggering mechanism for the LCRA1 deposit was poorly constrained, it is thought that stress rebound after glacial ice removal may have initiated failure. Due to the event occurring c.10,000 years ago, there was a lack of definition for a possible earthquake trigger, though the possibility is obvious. The LCRA₂ event had an original deposit volume of 0.66 x 10⁶ m³, and was constrained to the low-lying area adjacent to the Ryton River that had been created by river erosion of the LCRA1 deposit. Further erosion by the Ryton River has reduced the deposit volume to 0.4 x 10⁶ m³. A radiocarbon date from a piece of mānuka found within the LCRA2 deposit provided an age of 668 ± 36 years B.P., and this is thought to reliably date the event. The LCRA2 event also dammed the Ryton River, and the preservation of dam-break outwash terraces downstream from the deposit provides clear evidence of rapid dam erosion and flooding after overtopping, and breaching by the Ryton River. Based on the mean annual flow of the Ryton River, the LCRA2 lake would have taken approximately two weeks to fill assuming that there were no preferred breach paths and the material was relatively impermeable. The LCRA2 event is thought to have been coseismic with a fault rupture along the western segment of the PPAFZ, which has been dated at 600 ± 100 years B.P. by SMITH (2003). The small LCRA3 event was not able to be dated, but it is believed to have failed shortly after the LCRA2 event and it may in fact be a lag deposit of the second rock avalanche event possibly triggered by an aftershock. The deposit is only visible at one locality within the cliffs that line the Ryton River, and its lack of geomorphic expression is attributed to it occurring closely after the LCRA2 event, while the Ryton River was still dammed from the second rock avalanche event. A wedge-block of some 35,000 m³ of source material for a future rock avalanche was identified at the summit of Carriage Drive. The dilation of the rock mass, combined with unfavourably oriented sub-vertical bedding in the Torlesse Supergroup bedrock, has allowed toppling-style failure on both of the main ridge lines around the source area for the LCRADs. In the event of a future rock avalanche occurring within the Ryton riverbed an emergency response plan has been developed to provide a staged response, especially in relation to the camping ground located at the mouth of the Ryton River. A long-term management plan has also been developed for mitigation measures for the Ryton riverbed and adjacent floodplain areas downstream of a future rock avalanche at the LCRAD site.

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  • Constructing childhood for children : an analysis of 1970s award-winning children's literature from the Children's Model Collection at Auckland City Libraries

    Baker, Sanya Karen (2004)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Childhood is not simply a personal experience of an individual human in their early years of life. It is also a social construct which governs the way a society treats its youngest members – if they are considered to be members yet at all. Children’s literature is an acknowledged source of information about the ideologies adults have both intentionally and unintentionally offered children to help them understand the world and their place in it. This research involved both content analysis and discourse analysis of award-winning children’s books from the 1970s, which form part of the Children’s Model Collection held at Auckland City Libraries. These books, considered by local librarians to be ‘model literature’ for New Zealand children to read, were used as a window onto the constructions of childhood in this society at that time. Traditional children’s literature in English supported particular relations of domination through certain ‘institutions’ of childhood – family, friendship, gender, race and religion. The 1970s books also imparted ideologies through these institutions along with themes of land, coming of age and war; all interacting under a humanistic umbrella. Through their treatment of these themes or ‘institutions’, texts in this sample often deliberately challenged traditional relations of domination – with varied levels of success. Children were constructed as leaders in waiting, the hope for the future; a future where tolerance and respect would overcome prejudice, thinking for one’s self would replace conformity and the individual could be the best they could be. However, underlying linguistic mechanisms and ideologies transformed many of these texts into conservators of the very relationships they were intending to change. The methods of analysis used in this project were successful in locating the ideologies in books created for young people and revealing the degree to which these are agents of their time. These methods then are both eminently suitable for future research and would be a valuable addition to the multi-literacies with which we equip young people

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  • Citizenship on the agenda : a rights-based assessment of the meaning citizenship

    Besier, Antoinette Caroline, 1971- (2004)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Prying responsibly : defamation, breach of confidence, privacy and the defence of qualified privilege

    Barris, William. (2004)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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