1,490 results for 2004

  • The medical, ethical and legal issues surrounding the management of persistent vegetative state patients

    Bloore, Samuel Geoffrey (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 72 leaves ; 30 cm Includes bibliographical references. "1st July 2004"

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  • Climate change and the water yield of snow tussock grasslands in the Upper Taieri Catchment

    Cameron, Janine (2004)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 66 leaves :ill., facsim., maps, ports. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 63-66). University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Medication histories and the identification of adverse drug event-related hosptial admissions

    Cooke, Rachael Peart (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 190 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • An examination of some relationships between the New Zealand jurisprudence of shared, equal parental rights and responsibilities & the gendered hierarchy of care 1994-2002

    Evans, Marian J. (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 258 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 184-207. University of Otago department: Law.

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  • The Protean grid : Milan Mrkusich, formalism and change

    Craig, Chrissie (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 103 leaves :charts, music ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 88-89. University of Otago department: Art History and Theory. "December 2004."

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  • The routes of roots reggae in Aotearoa/New Zealand : the musical construction of place and identity

    Cattermole, Jennifer Anne (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 161 leaves :ill ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Music.

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  • Risky needling : a localised South Island study of women's experiences of amniocentesis

    McKay, Willow Reay (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis evolved from a question about how women experience amniocentesis in a New Zealand context, and emerged as a localised South Island study of women's amniocentesis experiences. The research process involved several methods including participant observation of both amniocentesis procedures and the counselling sessions that precede them at 'Southern Hospital' Antenatal Clinic. In addition, three consultants who perform the procedures, the assisting midwife, and receptionist were all interviewed about their role in the clinic's practice of amniocentesis, as well as their understandings of the technology. Thirteen women (who were recruited through the Antenatal Clinic) were also interviewed retrospectively about their experiences of amniocentesis. The collected data was then placed in the context of the international English language literature concerning prenatal testing. When communicating their experiences of amniocentesis it became evident that the women were telling stories, and so narrative analysis was used to frame the research. This perspective also allowed an investigation of further stories of amniocentesis, for instance, the stories of consultants, counselling sessions, medical discourse, popular culture, and the social scientists who have studied this procedure. The findings of this thesis locate amniocentesis as embedded within our interconnected physical, social, and cultural worlds. Some of the many themes that emerged through the analysis of this research include motherhood as an ideology that intersects with the technology in various ways, the contested nature of choice, and centrality of disability (and so 'normality' and 'abnormality') to understandings of amniocentesis. The women's stories also spoke about wider issues in society, such as the type of children that we want, the ways in which society privileges medicine and technology as a system of knowledge, and also amniocentesis as a site of gender negotiation, which identifies how the technology of amniocentesis can be approached with various agencies. The 'point' of amniocentesis was also investigated from various angles, identifying the very complex and situated understandings of the purpose of the test. Lastly the concept of risk, which is central to the practice and understanding of amniocentesis was investigated, identifying multi-layered perceptions and influences of risk for both the women who experience the procedure of amniocentesis and the consultants who perform it.

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  • Management and allocation of fresh water in New Zealand:

    Bartrum, Lisa Cherie (2004)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    93 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 69-80). University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Reliability and validity of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children Extended Age Band 4 in New Zealand

    Clarkson, Jenny (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    128 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Physical Education. "January 2004".

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  • Being musical : teachers, music and identity in early childhood education in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Bodkin, Sally (2004)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 294 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Music.

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  • Site Characterisation and Assessment of Sediments For Beach Renourishment

    Longdill, Peter Clifford (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Marsden Point, Northland, New Zealand, is a Holocene, prograded barrier spit at the tidal inlet to Whangarei Harbour. The development of the Northport timber export port at Marsden Point in late 2000 modified the tidal inlet dynamic equilibrium due to a large reclamation (32.6 ha) and dredged turning basin (31.8 ha to 13 m below Chart Datum). The effects of the Northport development on the inlet morphodynamics and the potential use of dredge sediments as beach nourishment fill are the foci of this study. Regional sediment transport patterns adjacent to the Northport development were inferred and documented through the interpretation of sediment grain size distributions, geomorphic analysis of historical shoreline and bathymetry data, analysis of beach profiles, identification of seabed sediment transport pathways, and calculation of potential sediment transport vectors from hindcast wind-wave and current meter data. Sediments found in the lower harbour are consistent with Schofield's (1975) Hauraki (B) facies. Shelly lag sediments, which armour and stabilise the bed, were observed in similar locations to those present in 1983. Sediment transport directions inferred from sediment textural analyses were generally in agreement with directions found from beach profile analysis, morphologic interpretation and calculation of potential sediment transport vectors. Analysis of thirteen rectified and geo-referenced vertical aerial photographs of the Marsden Point region over the period 1984 to 2001, indicated a general reduction in dry beach widths within the harbour, and an increase in beach width at Marsden Point, where opposing sediment transport vectors meet and the ebb tidal delta of Mair Bank became 'welded' to the shoreline. This area exhibits highly variable beach profiles and offshore bathymetry, indicative of the relatively large potential sediment vectors meeting at this location. Comparison of digital bathymetric surveys, sediment transport pathways and bedform locations both pre and post-development, indicates changes have been limited to the local reclamation and dredge basin areas. Reduced post-development sediment transport potentials were found in the northern areas of the dredge basin. There is potential for scour and the development of a shell lag at the dredge basin's eastern edge. Small-scale (-1,000m³yr¹} accretion has been observed against both western and eastern edges of the Northport reclamation. Accretion is occurring due to dominant longshore sediment transport patterns (western edge) and the creation of a 'current transport shadow zone' (eastern edge). Dredge basin sedimentation is expected to increase over the next 5-10 years to reach 15-20,000 m³ yr¹ as the beach profile against Northport's western edge 'fills' with sediment. Sediment grain size comparisons and sediment transport patterns have been used to develop an effective beach nourishment plan for Marsden Bay (West and Central) using sediments sourced from Northport's dredge basin. The Northport development has caused only local modifications to sediment transport processes operating within the lower Whangarei Harbour. There have been no largescale changes in sediment transport patterns or morphology observed postdevelopment.

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  • Music education in New Zealand primary schools : issues in implementing the music component of the arts curriculum

    Rohan, Tracy (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis investigates music education as it is currently theorised and practiced in New Zealand primary schools. The project arose from professional concern for the quality of music teaching in primary schools. The aim of the project was to gather ideas from some key informants about perceived barriers to the effective implementation of the music component of the current arts curriculum and, most importantly, to consider possible solutions to these barriers, so that an effective model of music education for primary schools might be identified and described. The key informants were people working in leadership roles for music education at a national level. They were selected because of their breadth of knowledge and experience within early childhood, primary, secondary and tertiary settings, and for their involvement in advocacy, school advisory work, teaching and research in music education. Each key informant participated in a semi-structured interview. They each suggested that music education is a specialist area requiring a teacher with a depth of pedagogical content knowledge. They advocated for specialist pathways within generalist teacher education qualifications leading to an implementation model where specialist teachers work collaboratively with generalist teachers to provide effective music education programmes.

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  • The Carich Affair: Picking up the "pieces" (students) and moving on

    McCarthy, C.; Roberton, G.; Jull, C.; Potgieter, C. (2004)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In recent years Private Training Enterprises (PTEs) started teaching diploma programmes at levels 5 and 6 in full competition with Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITP). ITPs became increasingly concerned about the ability of PTE students to pathway into higher level ITP programmes, so as to continue with their studies. The National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) had done considerable work to map the unit standards contained in the national diplomas to their qualifications and this exercise drew into question the perceived value of the PTE levels 5 and 6 diplomas from the perspective of ITPs (Ross & Roberton, 2003). In the event, these concerns became less relevant when a major player in the PTE domain collapsed. In October 2003 Carich were forced to close business down and suddenly the future of their students, including a major cohort from the international market, was in serious jeopardy. The New Zealand government requested higher education institutions to rescue students, recognizing the negative impact that the collapse of Carich would have on students. They also coordinated the re-assignment of students to institutions who volunteered to help. This paper is written as an opinion piece to explain how Wintec and CPIT handled the situation, which occurred at an extremely busy time of the year for ITPs. It discusses the associated problems, the benefits that accrued as a result of the successful rescue operation, and lessons learned from the experience.

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  • The use of yeasts and moulds as sensing elements in biosensors

    Baronian, K. H. R. (2004)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Whole cell biosensors are able to provide information that sensors based on single and multiple types of molecules are unable to do. For example broad-spectrum catabolite analysis, cell toxicity and genotoxicity are best detected in the context of a functioning cell. Most whole cell sensors have used bacterial cells as the sensing element. Fungal cells, however, can provide all of the advantages bacterial cells offer but in addition they can provide information that is more relevant to other eukaryote organisms. These cells are easy to cultivate, manipulate for sensor configurations and are amenable to a wide range of transducer methodologies. An overview of the use of yeast and filamentous fungi as the sensing element of some biosensors is presented here.

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  • The meaning of effective education for critical care nursing practice: a thematic analysis

    Hardcastle, J. E. (2004)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Continuing education and practice development are integral components of specialist nursing practice in environments such as intensive and critical care. Previous studies have examined the ‘effectiveness’ of various approaches to teaching and learning in critical care, yet few have considered how effective education affects the relationship between education and practice development. Using thematic analysis, this study explored the phenomenon of effective education (for critical care nursing practice) by asking: What does effective education for critical care nursing practice mean to nurses currently practising in the specialty? Eighty eight critical care nurses from the South Island of New Zealand provided written descriptions of what effective education for critical care nursing practice meant to them. Descriptive statements were analysed to reveal constituents, themes and essences of meaning. Four core themes of personal quality, practice quality, the learning process and learning needs emerged. Appropriateness or relevance for individual learning needs is further identified as an essential theme within the meaning of effective education for critical care nursing practice. Shared experiences of the phenomenon are made explicit and discussed with reference to education and practice development in the specialty. The study results lend support to education that focuses on individual learning needs, and identifies work based learning as a potential strategy for learning and practice development in critical care nursing.

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  • A history of avalanche accidents in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Irwin, D.; Owens, I. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is based on a study for the New Zealand Mountain Safety Council which investigated the circumstances contributing to the deaths of 128 people in avalanches between 1863 and 1999. The study identified a trend of high fatalities during European settlement followed by a lull in fatalities early last century and then an increase in recent decades similar to other recently colonized countries. Similar to other studies, most victims were in their twenties and shift from work-to recreation-based activities has occurred from a century ago to recent times. Comparison with other studies of more specific activities involved in recent decades showed that alpine climbing, people on training courses and in area skiers and patrollers were over-represented while out of area ski/boarders and snowmobilers were under-represented. The geographic distribution of fatalities is concentrated in the South Island reflecting the preponderance of terrain for climbing and skiing.

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  • The joy of the X: the design of an XML system

    Kennedy, D. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The two main uses of XML are data exchange and as a central source that can be extracted and displayed in multiple ways. This paper describes the design and development of an XML based system for course outlines that uses XML for data exchange and as a central repository. The central repository is constructed from a number of base XML documents that have been extracted from various disparate sources. The central repository is used to produce a range of different outputs in different formats. The design considerations, for the system, the schema and the XSL, are discussed.

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  • Where are they now? Making the transition - three years on

    McCarthy, C. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    366 Where are they now? Making the Transition - Three Years On. Three years ago, the author presented a paper on a pilot project for senior high school students (McCarthy 2002) that provided a programme for transition to tertiary study in a vocational institution in preparation for a career in information and communications technology. As a result of this project, CPIT believed it had “captured” a potential market of students better prepared to handle the demands of tertiary study. Those students appeared better informed as to their options and more able to make informed choices and it was thought they might prove to be better equipped to survive in tertiary study. The initial project has since initiated a great deal of interest within other Technical Institutes both here in New Zealand and, at least one overseas institution, and has also spawned several successors, including a full-scale ICT-orientated senior high school – unique in New Zealand. This paper re-examines the pilot scheme, and its successors, and follows the relevant tertiary experiences of the students involved in the past three years.

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  • Differing preceptions of knowledge management: a New Zealand context

    Nesbit. T. (2004)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Jolliffe and Nesbit (2002) in an exploratory study reviewed a number of pieces of literature relating to knowledge management. As a consequence of this literature review two knowledge workers (from quite different backgrounds) were asked to indicate their level of agreement with a number of statements relating to knowledge management. The purpose of this paper is to survey a much wider sample of knowledge workers in an attempt to try and identify the factors that lead different groups of knowledge workers to have different perceptions about what knowledge management is. Paper presented at the Third International Conference on Knowledge, Culture and Change in Organisations, Bayview Beach Resort, Penang, Malaysia, 11-14 August 2003

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  • Serving up server side programming

    Nesbit, T.; Raizis, R. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper explores what content should be focussed on in the teaching of a level 7 server side programming course (covering PHP) that is part of the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) and the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce (Grad Dip eCommerce) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT). Opinions were sought from members of a variety of PHP user groups about the importance of various topics that could be included in such a course. The project reports of students from both BICT and Grad Dip eCommerce who had completed their major projects using PHP were analysed, to determine which content in the course was the most useful for their projects. The outcome of the research includes some recommendations for increased coverage of some topics in the course under review, and the possibility of changing one of the other courses in the Grad Dip eCommerce from being strongly recommended to being compulsory. The findings of this research will be of use to CPIT and other institutions that are already teaching or are contemplating teaching web-programming courses using PHP at this level.

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