1,804 results for 2005

  • Informed preferences in forest-based land use planning in Indonesia : a methodological case study.

    Rahardja, Teguh (2005)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Indonesia is large and rich in natural resources. Its forest extends over 60 per cent of the country's land and contains many other natural resources. There are many stakeholders, often with conflicting interests. The demands placed on the forest have resulted in declining quantity and quality of the forest lands. People have recognised the need for reviewing and improving the forest-based land use plan, and, in so doing, promoting the participatory approach rather than the traditionally centralistic one. This has been attempted, but there were difficulties in the participatory evaluation of land use options' impacts. Therefore, this study aims to develop a method to help forestry-based land use planning take into account stakeholders' preferences after considering land use scenario consequences. Based on the situation in Indonesia and existing options, this study adopted the mixed rational-participatory approach. The rational side was attempted by FOLPI simulation of land use scenarios. An interview survey of opinions suggested eight scenarios of varying emphases on the economic, ecological and social aspects, which were simulated in FOLPI with area and resource data of each land use. The results were graphs of land use changes and their economic, ecological and social impacts. The participatory aspect was promoted by Q methodology applications. Q was used to analyse respondents' sorts of a set of statements about different aspects of land use planning, and revealed the typology and preferences of stakeholders with regard to land use planning. Using verbal statements in such exercises discovered the typology and normative preferences, while using the FOLPI application graphs as the statements disclosed the positive preferences. In tandem, they provide useful information as inputs to stakeholder deliberations towards a new, rational, and acceptable land use scenario. This study, therefore, recommends a method to help forest-based land use planning stakeholders. The method includes FOLPI simulation of the broad-scoped land use scenarios, and Q applications both the conventional verbal way and the innovative graphical way.

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  • Advanced surface texturing for silicon solar cells

    Ganesan, Kumaravelu (2005)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The multi-crystalline silicon (me-Si) solar cell is considered to be one of the most promising cells capable of achieving high efficiency at low cost and high reliability. Improving solar cells efficiency using low cost materials requires careful design considerations aiming to minimise the optical and electrical losses. In this work plasma texturing was employed to reduce optical reflections from silicon surfaces well below 1%. Plasma texturing is used to form light trapping structures suitable for silicon solar cells. Several plasma texturing methods are investigated and associated defects are analysed. Masked as well as mask-less texturing techniques are investigated. Conventional parallel plate Reactive Ion Elching (RIE), Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) and Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma system are used to compare the plasma induced defects in silicon. The influence of various plasma etch parameters on plasma induced defect is investigated. A correlation between the minority carriers lifetime and surface area increased by texturing is established. Effective lifetime measurements using Quasi Steady State Photo Conductive (QSSPC) technique is mainly used to estimate the plasma induced defect in textured silicon substrates. Sinton lifetime tester is used to measure the effective lifetime of the substrates. The implied open circuit voltage is calculated from the lifetime data for textured substrates. In this work low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy is also used to analyse the defect caused by plasma on me-Si substrates. Photoluminescence (PL) data is obtained using the 514.5 nm line of an Ar⁺ laser as an excitation source. The luminescence is dispersed with SPEX 1700 spectrometer with a liquid nitrogen cooled Germanium detector. Reflectance measurements are performed on textured surfaces usmg a purpose built integrating sphere attachment of a high accuracy spectrophotometer. Modelling is also performed using PV-optics software to compare the experimental and theoretical results. Finally, silicon solar cells are fabricated with measured efficiency around 18% . The efficiency is estimated from the I-V characteristics data obtained using a calibrated halogen lamp and a HP semiconductor parameter analyser. Spin-on-dopant source as well as solid diffusion source is used to form the ewitter junction of the solar cells fabricated on p-type silicon wafers. Multicrystalline silicon, CZ- silicon and FZ silicon wafers are used to fabricate solar cells in this thesis. The effect of single and double layer antireflection coatings on diffused reflections is also investigated.

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  • Researching the toxicity of party pills

    Gee, P.; Richardson, S. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Party pill use is on the increase. A research study at Christchurch Hospital's emergency department is tracking the adverse reactions to ingestion of these substances, which in New Zealand are freely availabe to any one aged over 18.

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  • NESB students - COPing with BICT: one year on

    Nesbit, T.; McPherson, F. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the success of a special foundation programme that has been completed by some international students as their first semester’s study towards the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies degree at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology. The findings are useful for evaluating the ongoing use of the special foundation programme and will be of use to other members of the NACCQ sector who are using or considering using a similar foundation programme.

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  • Maths with attitude: an encouragement based approach

    Kennedy, D. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) approach to the teaching of an introductory, level 2 (where level 5 is equivalent to stage 1 university), mathematics course. It describes what has been done to address maths anxiety and poor attitudes to mathematics. An analysis of Maths Anxiety Scores (MAS) and Maths Self-Concept (MSC) scores is presented and compared with achievement. The results of interviews with students who have completed this course are also presented.

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  • Understanding intraaortic balloon pumping

    Lewis, P. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Intraaortic balloon pumping is a complex procedure aimed at supporting a compromised heart. Carried out in many of the country's intensive care units, it is important that nurses understand the physiology and mechanics of the procedure so they can offer optimal nursing care.

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  • The benefits of nurse-led pre-assessment

    Harris, C.; Watson, P. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A nurse-led pre-assessment clinic in the cardiology day unit at Christchurch Hospital has proved to be an efficient use of resources, a satisfying experience for patients and a way for expen'enced nurses to extend their practice.

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  • The importance of innovative management practices as part of business success in a developing nation: a case study of Communications Fiji Ltd.

    Shanahan, M. W.; Shanahan, Y. P. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Communications Fiji Limited (CFL) is a profitable, high-profile, publicly owned media organisation originally set up in Fiji by William Parkinson in 1986. This company is a market leader and has expanded throughout the Pacific over the last decade to include radio stations in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. Much of the success of this small medium enterprise (SME) has been due to the innovative management practices employed and encouraged by Parkinson. Awareness of cultural differences, knowledge of indigenous traditions and viewpoints, and sensitivity to macro, societal, and internal influences, has allowed the company to successfully incorporate these sensibilities into everyday management philosophy. The CFL experience provides an example of functional and innovative management practices that may have utility for other SMEs in developing nations.

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  • 'Signs of genius apparent'-The art of James Cook (1904-60)

    Pauli, D. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Profiles the artist. Discusses his drawings, water colours and oil paintings. Details his travels overseas, including his time at the Edinburgh College of Art and the Royal Scottish Academy, and his activities with the Australian Forces during WW2.

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  • Coping with outbreaks of the norovirus

    Richardson, S. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The norovirus can have devastating effects on the health of the very young and the elderly. It can also have devastating effects on the ability of hospitals, emergency departments in particular, to function effectively when both patients and staff are infected.

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  • Independence and well-being in later life: three New Zealand studies

    Neville, S.; Keeling, S.; Milligan, K. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper argues that social gerontology is an appropriate methodological lens to investigate independence and well-being in later life and goes on to overview three diverse and independent pieces of research which cross disciplinary boundaries, geographic locations and philosophical terrains. A comparative analysis of the results from these studies identifies that health, economic status and social support influence the concepts of independence and well-being in older people. Nurses, particularly those working in primary health care, are likely to be the first point of contact for many older adults and need to operationalise a holistic assessment framework in order to address all components of ageing that influence independence and well-being in this group of people.

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  • Developing and running a photographic website

    Nesbit, T.; Oliver, R.; Hancock, M.; Nesbit, G. (2005)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes how a website was successfully developed for a Wellington-based photography business by a student completing the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology during 2004. The business specialises in photography of athletics and other sporting events throughout New Zealand, and it had been identified that a website that allowed the easy uploading of photos by the business so that customers could order copies would enhance the operations of the business. A group of students developed an initial prototype of the website as part of course work in the first semester of 2004 as an initial feasibility test and requirements gathering process. Two of these students developed the concept further as part of their cooperative education project at the end of that semester. A third student redeveloped the site in semester two of 2004 with the purpose of the site going live before the end of 2004. The site was launched successfully in late 2004.

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  • Research cultures under the microscope: three case studies

    Joyce, D.; Bridgeman, N.; Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) offer computing degrees and are under pressure to grow their “research cultures” in order to maintain their degree accreditation. The three authors have experienced this pressure in different ways: as heads of department, programme directors and research co-ordinators. In this paper they attempt to answer five research questions: • what patterns of growth/decay have been observed at three institutions of different sizes? • how has the balance between publication and presentation changed? • how has the balance between national and international changed? • how has the balance between conferences and journals changed? • what are the possible reasons for the observed changes?

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  • Women maintaining physical activity at midlife: contextual complexities

    Yarwood, J.; Carryer, J.; Gagan, M. J. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Health benefits associated with being active are well recognised and yet for many, particularly women at midlife, how this activity is maintained is both complex and poorly understood. This paper describes a qualitative feminist study in which 10 midlife women participated in two semi-structured interviews to explore factors influencing their ability to maintain physical activity over time. A thematic analysis uncovered participants’ beliefs and behaviours regarding their experience of, and strategies used to maintain, regular activity. Four core themes emerged; ‘exercise is part of me, part of my life’, ‘the importance of being fit and healthy’, ‘exercise interweaves and changes with life situations’, and ‘constraints and conflicts’. Encompassed within these four was a desire for life long good health and physical fitness. Maintaining regular physical activity was intrinsically connected to family, relationships and work. Findings from this study indicate how important it is for nurses to consider contextual realities when encouraging and supporting midlife women to maintain physical activity.

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  • Design mechanisms and constraints

    Pons, D. J.; Raine, J. K. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes a model of design, which takes a different perspective in that it emphasises mechanisms and constraints. The model accommodates design-related activities from the enterprise level through to activities of individuals (e.g. decision-making processes), and provides a holistic treatment of existing design methods. It is suggested that the output of a design stage is not so much the input to the next, as the provider of constraints. Consequently, the creative component of design is not concentrated in one task, with the others being technician tasks: instead each of the tasks augments the design in a creative way. A degree of commonality was observed across different domains and stages of design, which leads to the proposal of a generic design activity (GDA), that can be used in diverse design situations. Sub-activities within the GDA were identified as the generation of candidate solutions, solution assessment, solution selection, implementation, and retrieval of design intent. It is suggested that one of the limitations of many design tools, especially artificial intelligence, is the reliance on on complete problem and constraint specification. In real situations, designers have to determine constraints from incomplete and qualitative specifications, using subjective processes. Furthermore, they subsequently have to negotiate with others for the relaxation of constraints, as the design space may be over-constrained. This negotiation involves interaction with others, and adds the organisational behaviour factors to the design process. Decision-making during design needs to be able to accommodate multiple viewpoints, cope with uncertainty of analysis (incompleteness of knowledge), propagate uncertain variables, and accommodate varying degrees of information abstraction. Other areas of design that may benefit for additional research are identified.

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  • Invisible borders: sexual misconduct in nursing

    Hughes, M.; Farrow, T. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Sexual misconduct can occur when nurses practise in close physical or emotional proximity with patients. Nurses, however, have a professional responsibility to maintain professional boundaries to avoid the potential for sexual misconduct to occur. In New Zealand, there is evidence that some nurses have been involved in sexual misconduct, resulting in disciplinary proceedings against them. Despite this, there is an absence of guidelines and discussion for New Zealand nurses to prevent such occurrences. This article identifies difficulties in naming and defining sexual misconduct, and discusses sexual misconduct as an abuse of power by nurses. New Zealand and international literature about sexual misconduct by nurses and other health professionals is described, as are guidelines designed to prevent sexual misconduct. Finally, we make recommendations for actions needed to facilitate New Zealand nurses in identifying and avoiding sexual misconduct in practice.

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  • eLearning initiative for education in ICT

    McCarthy, C.; Ross, J. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    CPIT has recently started offering the Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT) (Level 5) in a blended delivery format to a small group of students under the Ministry of Education’s Digital Opportunities (DigiOPs) Community Technicians Project. This paper documents, reflects on and reviews the initial set-up, preparation and start-up of delivering the DipICT (Level 5) to a group of students located in remote rural areas throughout New Zealand. The results of this initial review, along with the two further stages of evaluative research, will help towards supporting the growth of flexible delivery methods that include eLearning and allow us to ensure effectiveness of such blends for future projects or instances of delivery.

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  • Where did the b……. go and is it still important?

    Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At the annual conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2001, it was decided to remove a word that began with “B” from the names of the level 5 and 6 qualifications that are part of the NACCQ family of qualifications. These qualifications were restructured for the 1992-year into an 18-module qualification structure. In the years since then, the number of modules being taught that relate to the same “B” word have reduced in proportion to the total number that are being taught. This paper describes the extent to which the decline in teaching modules related to the “B” word has actually happened; develops a hypothesis as to why this happened; and asks the question as to whether employers of graduates from these qualifications now place less importance on knowledge and skills related to the “B” word.

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  • The workplace eLearner: Designing and delivering eLearning into the workplace

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Historically, polytechnics and institutes of technology in New Zealand have had an extensive relationship with industry, business and the public sector employers in terms of placing students into internships, work experience, clinical placements and such like. Polytechnics are also able to secure relevant industry representatives on polytechnic programme advisory boards, for providing guidance with curriculum design and industry guidelines for applied qualifications. However, providing training and education in the workplace represents a very different situation. While polytechnics are seen as good providers of entry level workers that industry, business and the public sector can mould to their own particular culture and needs, in terms of providing training and education in the workplace, polytechnics are seen by some as inflexible, too expensive, unresponsive and not really equipped to develop and deliver programmes that are tailored to the client’s specific needs. Web-based technology enabled learning offers the potential for the New Zealand’s polytechnic sector to address many of the problems they have faced in delivering cost effective training and education into the workplace. It also has the possibility to deal with the perceived weaknesses of traditional methods of workplace-based training and instruction. While computer-based training offers the advantages of self-paced learning and skills training, the real value in a workplace learning environment is the ability to capture and leverage the knowledge, expertise and skills already present in the learners. This paper presents a case study of how a consortium of polytechnics have undertaken two related eLearning projects which deliver a national management qualification to current and aspiring supervisory personnel in the New Zealand public sector.

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  • New Zealand Trade Marks Act 2002 and it's References to Māori : a critical discussion

    Rustler, Marie-Christine (2005)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    New Zealand established the Trade Marks Act 2002 to meet the substantial changes in trade mark matters over the past 50 years. Particular focus was placed on improving the protection of trade mark rights for business and economic interests. As Māori groups' concerns regarding the former Trade Marks Act intensified, the Governments also began extensive consultation of Māori, revealing the dilemma for Maori cultural property when forced under Western-oriented trade mark law systems. This research paper analyses the new Act with respect to its references to Māori. It focuses on the unique sections 17(1 )(b)(ii) and 177 to 180 and the Governments' aims and intentions that underpin these regulations. Analysis of the paper aims to show the meaning of the law in trade mark practice, with regard to Māori and business people. The paper is based on the thesis that the Act is dishonest legislation. It argues that the Government presented the law as a significant improvement in all relevant matters; in particular, as law that for the first time provides Māori knowledge and cultural heritage with legal protection. It is shown, however, that the Act neither provides business/economic interests, nor Māori with satisfying law. The paper concludes that the Governments were not interested in revealing their actual intentions in trade mark matters. The Governments' political interests did not allow them to exclusively focus on business and economic interests. Therefore, the Governments introduced a few Māori regulations.

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