3,223 results for 2006

  • 'The danger of vertigo' : an evaluation and critique of Theōsis in the theology of Thomas Forsyth Torrance

    Habets, Michael (2006)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 387 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Theology and Religious Studies

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  • Copyright and its digital challenge : a comparison of New Zealand and German copyright law

    Gutman, Daniel (2006)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    145, [17] leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Law. "17 October 2006".

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  • Educating girls for a healthier Cambodia: The impact of education on girls' health knowledge, attitudes, and practices

    Cousins, Kimberly C (2006)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Introduction In recent decades, studies from developing countries have shown that maternal education is strongly correlated with child health. Many government agencies and non-governmental organisations have used this evidence to emphasise the importance of educating girls and women as an effective means of improving population health in the long-term. The relationship between maternal education and child health, though evident in many studies, is still not clearly understood. The differences between educated women and non-educated women are also indicative of wider socio-economic, cultural, and environmental differences that suggest that educated and non-educated women may be more influenced by other factors besides whether or not they have been to school. Furthermore, the immediate impact of education on girls' health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours, which may eventually affect both maternal and child health, has often been overlooked by researchers. An investigation of health knowledge and practices of young women may offer further insight into the mechanisms which determine their future children's health. As a developing country, Cambodia's leading causes of mortality and morbidity are from communicable diseases. Many of the country's inhabitants have limited access to adequate sanitation and water, health facilities, and schools. Although many humanitarian organisations and government and non-government agencies are working to improve the situation in Cambodia, little research has been conducted to determine effective strategies to improve the present and future health and well-being of young Cambodians. Purpose The purposes of this study were to evaluate the impact of schooling on young Cambodian women's health knowledge, attitudes, and practices, as well as to evaluate the health impact of a specific programme of the Cambodian Arts and Scholarship Foundation (CASF) that provides scholarships to young women. Methods Qualitative and quantitative data were collected using face-to-face interviews following a piloted, structured questionnaire. Three comparison groups were identified: CASF scholarship recipients, non-CASF students, and out-of-school participants. Eligible participants were selected by local informants and interviewed in Khmer or Bunong. Additional information was collected during focus groups with local villagers and interviews with village chiefs. Results Between April and August 2005, data were collected from 82 face-to-face interviews, nine village focus groups, and four interviews with village chiefs, in three Cambodian provinces and Phnom Penh. In-school and out-of-school participants lived in substantially different environments, primarily because in-school participants were more likely to live in rural areas (94.0%) than out-of-school participants (30.0%). Residence was an important determinant for access to hygiene and sanitation facilities, which would affect health practices and outcomes. Health practices improved among in-school participants, both CASF and non-CASF, although in CASF students, these improved practices were not reflected in health outcomes. Despite being in school, CASF students had similar health outcomes to out-of-school participants as regards self-reported health state and recent diarrhoeal disease incidence. Health knowledge of out-of-school participants was better than in-school participants, particularly for tuberculosis transmission and prevention methods. However, better health knowledge did not necessarily lead to improved health practices. Conclusion Although hand washing and other health practices were better and more consistent in the in-school groups, the poor health of CASF students suggests that education and improved health practices may not be sufficient in improving young people's health. Any benefits that may arise from educating girls may be overshadowed by an unhealthy physical environment, such as lack of toilets in communities and schools, inadequate access to safe water, and poor air quality. Socio-economic status also plays a huge role in the health status of young women, which, in the short term, at least is not mitigated by schooling.

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  • Family inclusive teamwork in mental health : collaborative working partnerships between the patient, family and staff, especially focussed on an acute adult mental health service in Dunedin

    Criglington, Ivan Murray (2006)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xxii, 141 leaves, 33 l;eaves of plates :col. ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 138-140) University of Otago department: Social Work and Community Development.

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  • Willi Fels: collector and patron

    Brown, Jennifer Anne (2006)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Physical description: 86, 3, 15 leaves : ill., ports. ; 30 cm. "6 October 2006". Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2008. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Greenstone distribution networks in southern New Zealand

    Cable, Nicholas Matthew (2006)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    62 leaves. "December 2006". University of Otago department: Anthropology.

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  • The privilege against self-incrimination in civil proceedings between private parties in Australia and New Zealand : is derivative use immunity the answer?

    Cotton, John (2006)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 367 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30cm Includes bibliographical references. "25 October 2006". University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Outsider influence and the utility of e-mail as an instrument for teaching in developing nations: a case study in Fiji

    Shanahan, M. W. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The impact of outsider influence in the advancement of human capital in developing nations is well documented1. This paper examines the utility of e-mail as a mechanism for delivery of outsider influence to middle managers in Fiji via a personal management development programme (PMDP). Thirteen participants took part in the PMDP over a six month period. The programme was aimed at enhancing their managerial skills by achievement of a series of negotiated objectives. There was one face-to-face meeting with each participant to set up the programme and negotiate objectives, and a second face-to-face meeting six weeks later to ensure all processes and systems were operational. During the six month duration of the programme, all other correspondence was limited to e-mail only.

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  • A standards-based approach to federated identity

    Lopez, M.; Mann, S.; Peppiatt, J.; Sewell, A.; Stott, C. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Federated Identity allows users to access multiple services at different organisations with the same credentials. In this paper, we summarise key work currently being carried out on Federated Identity. We evaluate several existing and suggested schemes and propose a new standards-based platform-neutral design pattern that uses current mature technologies and is suitable for the implementation of federated identity in a business-tobusiness context. The design pattern is verified with a practical implementation at two polytechnics.

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  • An exploratory study into the impact of NACCQ research

    Clear, T.; Young, A. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary investigation into the impact of research within the New Zealand National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) sector. Using a strategy based predominantly upon keyword search of academic reference databases, the study found that NACCQ projects and publications are beginning to be cited in diverse outlets, and are now making a contribution to the international literature in the computing disciplines. The study and its findings are briefly reviewed and the outlets in which NACCQ research has been cited are tabulated. This paper establishes the first profile of international citations for NACCQ research and provides a replicable baseline for subsequent studies into the impact of research originating in the sector.

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  • Electrochemical detection of wild type Saccharomyces Cerevisiae responses to estrogens

    Baronian, K. H. R.; Gurazada, S. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The presence of an estrogen binding protein (EBP) and an endogenous ligand in three yeast species was first reported in 1982/1983. The ligand was shown to be 17-estradiol and the binding affinities of EBP were demonstrated to be similar to those of rat estrogen receptors. This report describes detection of the behaviour of a putative estrogen binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a double mediator electrochemical detection system. The response to estrogen is shown to be quantitative with signals detectable from 10-8 to 10-14 M. An incubation period of 5 hours is established and a method to block electrochemical signals produced by the catabolism of exogenous substrates is demonstrated to be effective. The system provides a method that permits the use of wild type S. cerevisiae to quantify estrogens.

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  • m-learning for work based apprentices:- a report on trials undertaken to establish learning portfolios

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports on ongoing work that is being completed on developing a mlearning delivery package for apprentice bakers. These include: - a report on trials of formative assessment questions using the mass text messaging (SMS) software eTXT , from New Zealand Telecom. - the evaluation of web 2.0 applications (Flickr , Filemobile , Springdoo etc) to collate, archive and organise eportfolios of workplace based assessment evidence using mobile phones to gather the evidence in the form of photos, videos or audio files - a summary of suggestions that can be used to construct a customised mlearning platform for use at CPIT - the blending of various aspects of distance and mlearning that will be used to support mobile phone based delivery of a New Zealand National qualification - a start at building a model for mobile learning pedagogy pertinent to workplace based learners.

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  • Falling into trade:- apprentices' perceptions of becoming a baker

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is a report on the initial data analysis of a larger study on how apprentices become bakers. The overall objective of this study is to explore the apprenticeship journeys of young apprentices learning their trade in the New Zealand baking industry. This interim report is based on interviews with first year apprentices. The apprentices interviewed were all between 17 to 18 years of age. The majority of these apprentices left school in year 11 or 12 (equivalent to Australian years 10 and 11) with minimal National Certificate in Educational Achievement (NCEA) credits. Perhaps surprisingly, none of these apprentices had initial ambitions to become bakers. However, interestingly, they had all undertaken work experience in bakeries while at school. At the time of the interviews, they were well into their first year of working in a bakery. Therefore, this report provides a snapshot view of how these apprentices have settled into the baking life and their progress through the beginning stages of becoming bakers.

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  • Third-party courseware in higher education: The case of Microsoft official courses at one tertiary institution

    Correia, E. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A tertiary institution can purchase third-party courseware for its own purposes. The use of Microsoft courseware, for instance, though it raises a number of wide-ranging issues and challenges, can offer significant cost-effective benefits to an academic institution, especially one having to adapt to declining levels of funding. Large providers enjoy the economies of scale to be able to keep course material current, and produce not just information in paper format, but also multimedia materials that appeal to diverse students and improve the quality of teaching and learning in higher education.

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  • Fluorinated analogues of biological molecules: accessing new chemical, physical and biological properties

    Edmonds, M.; Peddie, V. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The introduction of fluorine into biological molecules often results in significant changes in their chemical, physical, and biological properties. As such, fluorinated analogues of biological molecules provide useful tools for probing and modifying the functions of biological systems. Where such modifications are beneficial to humans the fluorinated analogue becomes a potential therapeutic agent.

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  • Computer literacy: where are nurse educators on the continuum?

    Hanley, E. (2006)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Computers are becoming ubiquitous in health and education, and it is expected that nurses from undergraduate nursing programmes are computer literate when they enter the workforce. Similarly nurse educators are expected to be computer literate to model the use of information technology in their workplace. They are expected to use email for communication and a range of computer applications for presentation of course materials and reports. Additionally as more courses are delivered in flexible mode educators require more comprehensive computing skills, including confidence and competence in a range of applications. A cohort of nurse educators from one tertiary institution was surveyed to assess their perceived computer literacy and how they attained this. A questionnaire that covered seven domains of computer literacy was used to assess this. The results were illuminating and identified specific training needs for this group. Their perceived lack of skill with Groupwise email and the student database program are of concern as these are essential tools for nurse educators at this polytechnic.

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  • Belbin team roles, organisational patterns and eLearning: a case study

    Gibson, A.; Nesbit, T. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 2004 Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) embarked on a project to develop eLearning content for a number of modules from the Certificate in Computing (CIC) that is overseen by the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ). The purpose of this paper is to describe the process that was used to manage the development team and the key issues that arose, how Belbin Team Roles as described in Belbin (1981) could have been applied at the inception of the project, and how the use of organisational patterns as described in Coplien and Harrison (2005) could have been applied in making decisions about how the team would function. The paper identifies how some aspects of Belbin Team Roles were extremely helpful in the managing of the team, how some organisational patterns confirm different aspects of how the team was managed, and that had other organisational patterns been applied at the start of the project some aspects of the overall project would have been improved and enhanced.

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  • Education for registered nurses - does one size fit all?

    Hardcastle, J. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Postgraduate education does not meet the needs of all registered nurses. Assuming it does could be detrimental to nursing practice development and patient care.

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  • Surface soil chemistry at an alpine procellariid breeding colony in New Zealand, and comparison with a lowland site

    Harrow, G.; Hawke, D. J.; Holdaway, R. N. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Procellariid seabirds occupied colonies on the pre-human New Zealand mainland from the lowlands to alpine areas, but the effect of geographic environment on soil nutrient cycling has not been investigated. To facilitate qualitative predictions of seabird breeding effects on terrestrial ecology and biogeochemistry, we compared surface soil (0–15 cm) results from a Hutton’s shearwater colony at 1230 m with a Westland petrel colony in lowland forest.

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  • Early attrition among first time eLearner: a review of factors that contribute to drop-out, withdrawal and non-completion rates of adult learners undertaking eLearning programmes

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The problem of dropout rates in eLearning programmes has been argued over at length without any consistent conclusions about the degree of the problem, or a clear understanding of what factors contribute to learners dropping out, withdrawing or not completing eLearning courses. In examining the factors that affect attrition among distance online learners this paper focuses on the distinctive characteristics of mature adult learners undertaking part-time education by distance eLearning course for the first time. The available research suggests that attrition among mature adult online learners is affected by sociological, psychological, technical and cognitive factors, critical features of which are the notions of cognitive load and locus of control. This paper argues that first time eLearners often experience cognitive overload, (as described in Cognitive Load Theory), in the early stages of an online course and it is suggested that this is a likely contributor to high drop out rates, particularly in terms of those withdrawing within the first few weeks of the course start.

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