3,473 results for 2007

  • The cultural transmission of cookery knowledge : from seventeenth century Britain to twentieth century New Zealand

    Inglis, Raelene (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xv, 354 leaves :ill., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Anthropology.

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  • The social construction of femininities in a rural New Zealand community

    Gill, Erica Jane (2007)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 85-90). "June 2007"

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  • Dr Edward Shortland and the politics of ethnography

    Lousberg, Marjan Marie (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 321 leaves :col. port., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: History.

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  • Samurai Lear? : the cross-cultural intertexuality of Akira Kurosawa's Ran

    Gorringe, Karl (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    186 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: English. "Date: August 20, 2007."

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  • John Grierson, the NZNFU and the art of propaganda

    Hoskins, David John (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 187 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "6 February 2007." University of Otago department: Media, Film and Communication.

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  • A world of (linguistic) possibility : the rights-consistent interpretive directives of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and the United Kingdom Human Rights Act 1998

    Fenton, Bridget (2007)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 89 leaves :col. ill., maps (some folded) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-89) University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Imagining the revealed God : Hans Urs von Balthasar, Eberhard Jungel, and the triduum mortis

    Sharman, Elizabeth Pauline (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    'Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your minds.' [Rom 12:2] Hans Urs von Balthasar and Eberhard Jungel are profound and imaginative thinkers who unreservedly ground their theologies in revelation as God's self-disclosure. This thesis asks what resources such revelation-centred authors, from different traditions, may contribute to a theological understanding of the human imagination. Although theology has often been more interested in the constructive capacities of the imagination, it is the responsive quality of the imagination that is of particular interest to this thesis. Can the imagination contribute to a theological understanding which comprehends the action and speech of God as antecedent to human response? This thesis examines the epistemological issues that are related both to the imagination and to revelation as the self-communication and self-interpretation of God. The imagination is conceived of as essential to perception and understanding; it allows for both recognition and re-cognition. Through the imagination we can rethink the patterns or paradigms that shape our lives. The renewing of the mind can be said to involve the imagination. However, spiritual transformation requires more than a notion of the imagination as a spontaneous mental act which determines its own content. Balthasar and Jungel, while thinking in lively and narrative ways, are constrained by divine self-disclosure. God's self-revelation provides the content of the paradigm or pattern by which the Christian believer is to live. The imagination can be said to act as the context or locus of revelation. This thesis demonstrates that the three days of Easter are central to Balthasar's and Jungel's respective understandings of God. For Balthasar and Jungel, the triduum mortis is where the self-revelation of God is most apparent; it is here that God is understood to be self-giving love as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. While quite distinct in their approaches, both authors work within trinitarian, and therefore relational, frameworks. This thesis traces the motifs that not only express their understandings of the paschal mystery in relational terms but also ground their respective understandings of renewed existence; for Balthasar, the motifs of mission and kenosis, and for Jungel, those of identification and justification. For both Balthasar and Jungel, the events of the triduum mortis can be said to provide the content of, and act as a boundary to, our conception of God. Nonetheless, it is proposed that, within their respective understandings of divine prevenience, Balthasar and Jungel leave room for the exercise of the imagination. God is mystery; God is not a fixed or completed concept.

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  • 'Blood, sweat and queers' : (re)imagining global queer citizenship at the Sydney 2002 Gay Games

    Burns, Kellie Jean (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xxii, 260 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "September 17, 2007". University of Otago department: School of Physical Education.

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  • From Wonder Woman to Aeon Flux : women heroes, feminism and femininity in post-war New Zealand

    Cullen, Lynda (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: v, 140 leaves ; 30 cm. Notes: "March 2007". University of Otago department: Anthropology. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • "Don't just visit. Live it!" : a descriptive study of Japan exchange and teaching programme participants' experiences in Miyazaki prefecture

    Doering, Timothy Adam (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: v, 166 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. Notes: "June 28, 2007" -- t.p. University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (M. Tour.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Farm women : diverse encounters with discourse and agency

    Peoples, Susan J (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis contributes to the established literature on farm women within the context of family farming. It recognises that not enough is yet known about the discourses and agency which influence their lives. Consequently, this study has sought to establish what dominant discourses shape the lives of farm women, their responses to these discourses and how their discursive positioning influences their agency. This study employed a qualitative case study approach involving interviews with a diverse mixture of independent farm women, along with women farming in marital relationships. This thesis engages these narratives to showcase the colourful, complex life-experiences of farm women. In addition, and where present, women's partners were interviewed to provide male farmers' perspectives about women in family farming. This research has found that women's lives are shaped by positioning and contextualising discourses, with which they comply to ensure that the family farm survives. Their subservient discursive positioning limits the agency they can express, although they are able to mobilise indirect agency through supporting their partner; an implicit form of agency which has previously been unrecognised or understated. Cumulatively, this thesis highlights the need to recognise the diversity of farm women, and how they are able to exercise agency from their constrained subject positions within the family farming context. Furthermore it emphasises that agency is a dynamic, and far more varied concept than previously understood.

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  • The spatial ecology of yellow-eyed penguin nest site selection at breeding areas with different habitat types on the South Island of New Zealand

    Clark, Ryan D (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: ix, 82 leaves : col. ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes: Thesis typescript. University of Otago department: Zoology. "21 December, 2007." Thesis (M. Sc.)--University of Otago, 2008. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Participation, urbanism and power

    Bond, Sophie (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xiii, 312 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "July 2007". University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Referral source selection in word of mouth communication : findings from export education movements of China and Malaysia

    Gray, Vaughan Ronald (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    264 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Marketing.

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  • The role of film in destination decision-making

    Croy, William Glen (2007)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Format: xv, 346 leaves: ill. (chiefly col.); 30 cm.

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  • Aqua, aqua, undique : aspects of Roman domestic water use

    Harrison-Sim, Michelle (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    282 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Bibliography: l. 264-282. University of Otago department: Classics. "June 2007."

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  • Possible selves and career transition: It's who you want to be, not what you want to do

    Plimmer, G. (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Desire for career change is the driver behind much adult study. Career change and going back to school as an adult are often stressful. For the individual, the experience often begins with a state of dissatisfaction about who you are and who you are becoming. Dissatisfied adults who make major career changes generally become more satisfied than those who did not, suggesting that the associated struggle is usually worthwhile (Thomas, 1980). Career transition often represents a radical break from earlier goals and plans. It may conflict with family obligations; it may involve trying out new roles and identities and revisiting past obstacles and fears (Schlossberg, 1984). Beneath the carefully written resume, the reasons for seeking career change may be fraught with emotion, uncertainty, and the desire to be someone different. Possible selves theory, when applied to new approaches to career development and adult education, helps us understand how adults manage transition and move toward being the selves that they want to become. This chapter outlines how possible selves theory is used in career development, and how these uses might apply to adult learning. It draws on theory, practice, and, for illustration, vignettes from a study of mature students’ experiences in a New Zealand polytechnic college (Schmidt, Mabbett, and Houston, 2005). It includes some personal conclusions taken from our experience of using possible selves with clients and presents a five-step process to use with learners in developing effective possible selves. Each section ends with some practical career development techniques that may be of use to adult educators. Being a mature adult in career transition is different from being a younger person, though younger people are the chief concern of traditional learning and career theories (Taylor and Giannantonio, 1990). Mature adults interpret themselves and the world with more complexity than the young (Hy and Loevinger, 1996), while also having a more narrow and specialized sense of self. Mature adults are less guided by social comparison and more guided by comparison with how they ideally want to be (Ouellete and others, 2005). Usually, they are less malleable than younger people, and may be experiencing an intense search for meaning (Zunker, 1990). Their sense of opportunity is often limited by obligations to others, like Kim, a middle-aged woman who comments that “The biggest obstacle for me is my home commitments because I have four children and a family to run”. Adult learners may also have a sense of running out of time. William, a mature part time student, is dispirited by what he calls his “protracted process” and is daunted by his realisation that “I’ve got a six year process before I’m even qualified … at that stage I’ll be 51 years old.” When an adult returns to study, it can be an attempt to break out of a sense of limited opportunities and restricted roles. Back in an education setting, adults may find their deeply held assumptions, beliefs and expectations threatened. Further, mature adults can feel like impostors, culturally alien and isolated (Brookfield, 1999). Older people in career transition often see themselves as having fewer psychological resources; they may experience more stress and less progress, and may perceive more barriers to change than younger people (Heppner, Multon, and Johnston, 1994). These themes of stress, circumscription, search for meaning, complexity, and narrowing and consolidating the self are well traversed in the adult learning and adult careers literatures (Brown and Brooks, 1996; Knowles, 1990; and Zunker, 1990).

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  • Estimation of Cronbach’s alpha for sparse datasets

    Lopez, M. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Cronbach’s alpha is widely used to evaluate the internal consistency of a psychometric instrument. Its popularity is largely based on a straightforward interpretation in terms of correlations, its ease of calculation and the guidance it gives to building a single dimensional scale. The standard calculation of alpha, however, requires a complete dataset and can give misleading results with sparse datasets. An alternative method of calculating an equivalent to Cronbach’s alpha is proposed that retains the essence of alpha and can be readily calculated for sparse datasets. A theoretical basis is given and the method is evaluated and validated against generated datasets.

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  • The use of a commercial ERP system: Teaching business systems computing students

    Comins, N.; Young, A. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes the use of a commercial Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system in an undergraduate degree course. It will describe the process of deciding on which system to use, the implementation of several different ERP systems and the integration of the system into the curriculum of the course. The paper will also discuss the different pedagogical uses of the system, the different ways in which such a system can be implemented and the advantages and disadvantages of the different systems that were implemented. The paper will conclude with lecturer and student feedback on the process and application of employing such a large system into the course to enhance the teaching and learning of a business information system to computing students..

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  • mLearning and the workplace learner: Integrating mLearning ePortfolios with Moodle

    Chan, S.; Ford., N. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports on trials undertaken at CPIT to set up a support system for workplace based learning. A mlearning programme involves the use of a text messaging to disseminate summative and formative assessments. The use of mobile phones to take photos, videos, audio and text evidence of workplace skills being acquired to compile an eportfolio are also part of the trials. Evidence will be stored on Web 2.0 applications / personal portals and accessed by students via a course site set up using the content management system, Moodle.

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