3,494 results for 2007

  • Possible selves and career transition: It's who you want to be, not what you want to do

    Plimmer, G. (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Desire for career change is the driver behind much adult study. Career change and going back to school as an adult are often stressful. For the individual, the experience often begins with a state of dissatisfaction about who you are and who you are becoming. Dissatisfied adults who make major career changes generally become more satisfied than those who did not, suggesting that the associated struggle is usually worthwhile (Thomas, 1980). Career transition often represents a radical break from earlier goals and plans. It may conflict with family obligations; it may involve trying out new roles and identities and revisiting past obstacles and fears (Schlossberg, 1984). Beneath the carefully written resume, the reasons for seeking career change may be fraught with emotion, uncertainty, and the desire to be someone different. Possible selves theory, when applied to new approaches to career development and adult education, helps us understand how adults manage transition and move toward being the selves that they want to become. This chapter outlines how possible selves theory is used in career development, and how these uses might apply to adult learning. It draws on theory, practice, and, for illustration, vignettes from a study of mature students’ experiences in a New Zealand polytechnic college (Schmidt, Mabbett, and Houston, 2005). It includes some personal conclusions taken from our experience of using possible selves with clients and presents a five-step process to use with learners in developing effective possible selves. Each section ends with some practical career development techniques that may be of use to adult educators. Being a mature adult in career transition is different from being a younger person, though younger people are the chief concern of traditional learning and career theories (Taylor and Giannantonio, 1990). Mature adults interpret themselves and the world with more complexity than the young (Hy and Loevinger, 1996), while also having a more narrow and specialized sense of self. Mature adults are less guided by social comparison and more guided by comparison with how they ideally want to be (Ouellete and others, 2005). Usually, they are less malleable than younger people, and may be experiencing an intense search for meaning (Zunker, 1990). Their sense of opportunity is often limited by obligations to others, like Kim, a middle-aged woman who comments that “The biggest obstacle for me is my home commitments because I have four children and a family to run”. Adult learners may also have a sense of running out of time. William, a mature part time student, is dispirited by what he calls his “protracted process” and is daunted by his realisation that “I’ve got a six year process before I’m even qualified … at that stage I’ll be 51 years old.” When an adult returns to study, it can be an attempt to break out of a sense of limited opportunities and restricted roles. Back in an education setting, adults may find their deeply held assumptions, beliefs and expectations threatened. Further, mature adults can feel like impostors, culturally alien and isolated (Brookfield, 1999). Older people in career transition often see themselves as having fewer psychological resources; they may experience more stress and less progress, and may perceive more barriers to change than younger people (Heppner, Multon, and Johnston, 1994). These themes of stress, circumscription, search for meaning, complexity, and narrowing and consolidating the self are well traversed in the adult learning and adult careers literatures (Brown and Brooks, 1996; Knowles, 1990; and Zunker, 1990).

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  • Estimation of Cronbach’s alpha for sparse datasets

    Lopez, M. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Cronbach’s alpha is widely used to evaluate the internal consistency of a psychometric instrument. Its popularity is largely based on a straightforward interpretation in terms of correlations, its ease of calculation and the guidance it gives to building a single dimensional scale. The standard calculation of alpha, however, requires a complete dataset and can give misleading results with sparse datasets. An alternative method of calculating an equivalent to Cronbach’s alpha is proposed that retains the essence of alpha and can be readily calculated for sparse datasets. A theoretical basis is given and the method is evaluated and validated against generated datasets.

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  • The use of a commercial ERP system: Teaching business systems computing students

    Comins, N.; Young, A. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes the use of a commercial Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system in an undergraduate degree course. It will describe the process of deciding on which system to use, the implementation of several different ERP systems and the integration of the system into the curriculum of the course. The paper will also discuss the different pedagogical uses of the system, the different ways in which such a system can be implemented and the advantages and disadvantages of the different systems that were implemented. The paper will conclude with lecturer and student feedback on the process and application of employing such a large system into the course to enhance the teaching and learning of a business information system to computing students..

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  • mLearning and the workplace learner: Integrating mLearning ePortfolios with Moodle

    Chan, S.; Ford., N. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports on trials undertaken at CPIT to set up a support system for workplace based learning. A mlearning programme involves the use of a text messaging to disseminate summative and formative assessments. The use of mobile phones to take photos, videos, audio and text evidence of workplace skills being acquired to compile an eportfolio are also part of the trials. Evidence will be stored on Web 2.0 applications / personal portals and accessed by students via a course site set up using the content management system, Moodle.

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  • NMR-Solution structures of fluoro-substituted β-peptides: A 3 14-helix and a hairpin turn. The first case of a 90 [degrees] O=C-C-F dihedral angle in an α-fluoro-amide group

    Mathad, R. I.; Jaun, B.; Flögel, O.; Gardiner, J.; Löwenenck, M.; Codee, J. D.C.; Edmonds, M. K. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    To further study the preference of the antiperiplanar (ap) conformation in a-fluoro-amide groups two b-peptides (1, 2), containing a (2-F)-b3hAla and a (2-F)-b2hPhe residue, have been synthesized. Their NMR-solution structures in CD3OH were determined and compared with those of non-fluorosubstituted analogs (3, 4a). While we have found in a previous investigation (Helv. Chim. Acta 2005, 88, 266) that a stereospecifically introduced F-substituent in the central position of a b-heptapeptide is capable of “breaking” the 314-helical structure by enforcing the F–C–C=O ap-conformation, we could now demonstrate that this same procedure leads to a structure with the unfavorable ca. 90º F–C–C=O dihedral angle, enforced by the 314-helical folding in a b-tridecapeptide (1, Fig. 4). This is interpreted as a consequence of cooperative folding in the longer b-peptide. An F-substituent placed in the turn section of a b-peptidic hairpin turn was shown to be in an ap-arrangement with respect to the neighboring C=O bond (2, Fig. 7). Analysis of the non-fluorosubstituted b-tetrapeptides (with helix-preventing configurations of the two central b2/b3-amino acid residues) provides unusually tight hairpin structural clusters (3, 4a, Fig. 8, 9). The skeleton of the b-tetrapeptide H-(R)b3hVal-(R)b2hVal-(R)b3hAla-(S)b3hPhe-OH (4a) is proposed as a novel, very simple back-bone structure for mimicking a-peptidic hairpin turns.

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  • Risky work: Child protection practice

    Stanley, T. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The introduction of a differential response model to the New Zealand child protection system is an important social policy initiative. However, the differential response literature has yet to address the role that risk discourses play as organising and regulatory regimes in contemporary child protection work, and this paper addresses this gap. Child protection social work is strongly underpinned by discourses of risk, and this is best illustrated in the adoption of risk assessment tools that aim to assist the practices of risk assessment and its management. This paper traces the shifting and discursive functions of risk in child protection social work, and argues that Child, Youth and Family (CYF)2 social workers are negotiating a complex and increasingly pressured practice environment where difficult decisions can be legitimised through the use of risk discourses. The author’s doctoral study, which considered risk discourses and statutory social work practice decisions, is drawn on to illustrate how social workers may inadvertently compromise the differential response system – a system where the discursive functions of risk are likely to remain central and regulatory. There is a danger that CYF social workers might construct their role within such a system as increasingly the assessor and manager of high risk. This paper advocates for social work training and supervision as forums where practitioners can consider and better understand these risk discourses.

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  • Key attributes for success within the ICT job market: a case study of ICT students' view

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on attributes that are seen as being critical to success within the ICT sector roles. The required attributes as identified by a study of 205 randomly selected ICT roles have been compared with students’ perception (based on the preliminary results of a study of one student focus group). Overall, there were difficulties in drawing clear conclusions from the outcome of one case study only. However, we were able to identify some key issues in both agreements and mismatches on winning attributes for future studies.

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  • How does enterpreneurship within rural tourism diversify rural ecomonies - Banks Peninsula - New Zealand?

    Cloesen, U. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Rural tourism is considered an economic alternative for farmers who are facing sinking profits and require additional income. This in turn can lead to an entrepreneurial response. The distinction between simple diversification and entrepreneurial response. The distinction between simple diversification and entrepreneurship takes place when seperate legal entities for new ventures are formed. Entrepreneurship is commonly defined as creating something of value from practically nothing (Timmons in Morrison et. al., 1999, p.10). It is the process of creating or seizing an opportunity, and pursuing it regardless of the resources currently personally controlled. this involves the definition, creation and distribution of value and benefits to individuals, groups, organisations and society at large. One example for this is the establishment of the first private rural walkway in New Zealand on Banks Penninsula.

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  • Becoming a baker:- from 'hopeful reactor' to' passion honer'

    Chan, S. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper focuses on emergent themes from interviews with young apprentice bakers. It is part of a larger study of how young people become bakers. The overall objective of the main study is to explore the apprenticeship journeys of young apprentices learning their trade in the New Zealand baking industry. This paper reports on interviews carried out with second year apprentices. It reveals that the majority of the apprentices in the study, who had taken on an apprentice due to lack of other choices, are gaining confidence in their abilities. This confidence is shown in their building passion for the trade and their growing commitment towards becoming bakers.

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  • Not accepting oblivion - The career of Cedric Savage

    Pauli, D. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article is the result of my continuing engagement with biography as a mode of framing art historical research. It proved challenging to write because during the later stages of his career, Savage frequently moved between Europe and New Zealand and had to negotiate on-going economic and political changes, both at home and abroad. Moreover, his career coincided with the rise of modernism, and the subsequent split of the already distinctly regionalised New Zealand art world into pro- and anti-modernist factions. Not least because of his working class background, complex personality and ambiguous sexual orientation, this proved to be a difficult context for Savage to negotiate. His letters are often frank, and discuss in some detail the realities of trying to make a living as an artist in New Zealand. Writing his biography therefore allowed me to develop a more nuanced perspective of the life of a professional painter in 20th century New Zealand painting, beyond the more commonly applied modernist paradigm.

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  • Development of the New Zealand nursing workforce: historical themes and current challenges

    Gage, J.D.; Hornblow, A.R. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Development of the New Zealand nursing workforce has been shaped by social, political, scientific and inter-professional forces. The unregulated, independent and often untrained nurses of the early colonial period were succeeded in the early 1900s by registered nurses, with hospital based training, working in a subordinate role to medical practitioners. In the mid/late 1900s, greater specialization within an expanding workforce, restructuring of nursing education, health sector reform, and changing social and political expectations again reshaped nursing practice. Nursing now has areas of increasing autonomy, expanding opportunities for postgraduate education and leadership roles, and a relationship with medicine which is more collaborative than in the past. Three current challenges are identified for nursing in New Zealand‟s rapidly evolving health sector; development of a nursing focused knowledge culture, strengthening of research capacity, and dissemination of new nursing knowledge.

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  • Carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 enrichment in coastal forest foliage from nutrient-poor and seabird-enriched sites in southern New Zealand

    Hawke, D. J.; Newman, J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    To assess the effect of nutrient inputs from breeding seabirds on forest foliage δ13C and δ15N, we collected foliage samples from two contrasting locations. Olearia lyallii forest on North East Island at The Snares hosts large numbers of (in particular) breeding sooty shearwaters (Puffinus griseus). At Mason Bay (Rakiura/Stewart Island), samples of Brachyglottis rotundifolia, Griselinia littoralis, and Dracophyllum longifolium were collected from two strata within diverse dune forest and one stratum from the open dunes. The δ13C results were typical of C3 plants and did not differ significantly between Mason Bay and North East Island. In contrast, the δ15N results from Mason Bay (mean ± standard deviation, -6.1 ± 1.7‰) were significantly lower than expected for temperate forest (95% confidence interval of difference, 2.7–3.9‰), and dramatically lower (19.1–21.5‰) than North East Island where enrichments (+14.2 ± 3.1‰) were among the highest ever reported for vegetation.

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  • Caring for obese patients in a culturally safe way

    Hughes, M.; Farrow, T. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Obesity is a culturally constructed concept and nurses need to be culturally safe in their practice, when caring for those labelled obese.

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  • Where's the bling of the thing? Ethics, gaming and PBL-1

    McCarthy, D. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes an evaluation of PBL-Interactive (PBL-I), an authoring tool for an ethical decision making game, within the Dip ICT course, ET600 Ethics and professionalism, at Christchurch Polytechnic, Institute of Technology, (CPIT). The tool was developed through the e-Learning Collaborative Development Fund (eCDF) for use in online and face to face delivery. While the prototype was developed and the usability testing conducted with student volunteers returned positive results, the limitations of the authoring tool in a multilinear gaming environment outweighed its affordances. In particular, the authoring mode interface lacked ease of use and functionality for advanced features such as video and audio required to develop multiple ethical choices to motivate students with advanced gaming experience in online and face to face learning environments.

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  • How can mental health nurses prove they are culturally safe?

    Hughes, M.; Farrow, T. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Historically, nurses have been required to be culturally safe in their practice. (1,2) But now all registered nurses (RNs) must show competency within their scope of practice, including evidence of competence in culturally safe practice. (3) At first, this requirement may appear challenging for nurses working in mental health, given that practice in this area sometimes requires nursing people against their will, or where personal freedoms are temporarily restricted. While mental health practice does have some unique challenges, good mental health nursing practice actually exemplifies cultural safety. Likewise, cultural safety supports the articulation of good mental health nursing practice, and the description of good mental health nursing practice will likely meet the requirements of an audit of culturally safe practice. Some mental health nurses have expressed concern that in any audit they cannot articulate the true complexities of mental health nursing. However, we suggest good mental health nursing practice embraces cultural safety.

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  • Relating to families through their seasons of life

    Tritschler, E.; Yarwood, J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    An indigenous practice model - Seasons of Life - offers nurses a new way of relating to families transitioning to parenthood.

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  • Nurses assessing family violence - Some hidden dangers

    Stanley, T.; Yarwood, J.; Brook, G.; Watson, P. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Nurses need to tread carefully when questioning women about their experiece of family violence, under the Government's expanded violence intervention programme. There are hidden dangers in this policy approach.

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  • The ICT journey from diplomas to degrees: the CPIT staircasing experience

    Nesbit, T.; McCarthy, C. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The purpose of this paper is to explore aspects of the pathways from diploma level study in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to degree level study in ICT. The aspects explored include the role that such pathways play for students who for a variety of reasons did not enter degree level study upon leaving the school education system and to evaluate their success rates when they transferred to degree level study mid way through their degree. Over seventy (70 students) who have completed the Diploma in Information and Communications Technology Level 6 (DipICT L6) have transferred into the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology since 2002. These students are exempted from completing 180 credits of the 360 credits that are required for the BICT degree. This paper compares the success rates of these students in the BICT courses that they complete with the success rates of students who entered the BICT degree at year one and draws the conclusions that these students have success rates that are on a par with those of other students in the BICT degree and that the Staircasing arrangement that is in place is successful.

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  • A review of research literature addressing male partners and smoking during pregnancy

    Gage, J. D.; Everett, K.; Bullock, L. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    OBJECTIVE: To gain a more complete understanding of cigarette smoking and cessation during pregnancy by examining the men's role in supporting smoking cessation of their pregnant partners DATA SOURCES: A search of online data included CINAHL, Medline, and PsychLit databases. STUDY SELECTION: Studies published in the last 10 years, in English language, included three phenomena: pregnancy, male partners, and cigarette smoking. DATA EXTRACTION: Data were identified and organized according to theoretical, descriptive, and intervention methods of research. DATA SYNTHESIS: A growing body of literature indicates an interaction between pregnancy, male partners, and smoking behaviors. Explicating relationships between these phenomena is necessary for understanding and encouraging behaviors that promote maternal, child, and family health. CONCLUSIONS: Current research that includes the phenomena of pregnancy, male partners, and smoking behaviors highlights a need to further investigate the potential relationships, interactions, and health consequences of smoking behaviors of men and women during pregnancy.

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  • Abusing the abused? The 'double whammy' of 'elder abuse and neglect'

    Brook, G. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The author reflects on the silence of the social work sector when it comes to the issue of elder abuse and neglect in New Zealand. She cites that the silence might imply that social work has adopted the culture of ageism. He argues that social workers are obliged to critically examine services for elders in general and those designed, developed, organized and delivered to address older people abuse and neglect in particular. She asserts that all attempts to design services have been driven by a commitment to support and empower abused elders.

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