4,185 results for 2008

  • Parental bereavement: From grief theory to a creative nonfiction perspective on grieving the death of a young adult child from cancer

    Arnold, S. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Developing and introducing courses on testing and quality assurance

    Joyce, D.; Young, A. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reviews the processes involved in developing level 6 and 7 courses on testing and quality assurance. These processes include having the initial idea, conducting market research, deciding to proceed, forming a development team, gathering data, deciding levels and prerequisites, identifying resources, obtaining approvals, and marketing to students. The paper also reflects on the learnings gained from the experience of delivering the level 6 course for the first time.

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  • Attracting students to computing: The collaborative development of an innovative marketing tool

    Young, A. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Over the past few years students enrolling in computing courses or choosing computing as a major have been declining. (McCallum, 2006, Chabrow, 2004) Review of the literature tells us that one of the reasons for this decline is the “image of computing” as a viable career option. To help eliminate this myth a project was established under the Accelerating Auckland Task Force TEC funding to create a DVD for high school students to show how exciting a career in computing can be. Six Auckland tertiary institutions collaborated to design and produce a DVD outlining eight different careers in the field of computing. This paper outlines the background to the declining enrolments, the collaboration of the six tertiary providers and the production and development of the DVD. Free copies of the DVD will be available at the presentation.

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  • Nurses' views of family nursing in community contexts: An exploratory study

    Yarwood, J. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article is chosen as it provides a community nurses' perspective about family nursing, of which there is a dearth of understanding both in New Zealand and abroad. The qualitative exploratory study was designed to give voice to community nurses views about working with families and to encourage debate and discussion about the possibilities of family nursing in nursing practice this country. To do this and to ensure it reached academic and clinical nurses to inform practice, it was important this article was published in the only national, well recognised scholarly, peer reviewed nursing journal, that focusses on nursing research, Nursing Praxis in New Zealand. This article was recently picked up internationally and cited in a literature review 'Study of the implementation of a new community health nurse role in Scotland' URL http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2012/03/1388/13.

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  • Pre-school children frequently seen but seldom heard in nursing care

    Watson, P. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A significant number of users of nursing services are ]3re-school children, and have a right to be heard in matters affecting their health. Despite nurses' duty to seek and take seriously the views of children in matters concerning children's health, children are rarely directly consulted as consumers of health care. Thus, children's voices are largely unheard in nursing practice. Furthermore, research about children's experience of illness generally excludes preschool children. Therefore, preschool children's voices are also mostly unheai-d in nursing research about the experience of being ill. Consequently, there is little evidence from nursing practice or research to show the potential benefits of ensuring these voices are heard. This line of reasoning forms the basis of recommending the need for research that seeks to understand how preschool children experience being ill and how they communicate those experiences to others.

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  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • A comparison of activities undertaken by enrolled and registered nurses on medical wards in Australia: an observational study

    Chaboyer, W.; Wallis, M.; Duffield, C.; Courtney, M.; Seaton, P.; Holzhauser, K.; Schluter, J.; Bost, N. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: The past decade has seen increasing patient acuity and shortening lengths of stays in acute care hospitals, which has implications for how nursing staff organise and provide care to patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the activities undertaken by Enrolled Nurses (ENs) and Registered Nurses (RNs) on acute medical wards in two Australian hospitals. Design: This study used structured observation, employing a work sampling technique, to identify the activities undertaken by nursing staff in four wards in two hospitals. Nursing staff were observed for two weeks. The data collection instrument identified 25 activities grouped into four categories, direct patient care, indirect care, unit related activities and personal activities. Setting: Two hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Results: A total of 114 nursing staff were observed undertaking 14,528 activities during 482 hours of data collection. In total, 6,870 (47.3%) indirect, 4,826 (33.2%) direct, 1,960 (13.5%) personal and 872 (6.0%) unit related activities were recorded. Within the direct patient care activities, the five most frequently observed activities (out of a total of 10 activities) for all classifications of nursing staff were quite similar (admission and assessment, hygiene and patient/family interaction, medication and IV administration and procedures), however the absolute proportion of Level 2 RN activities were much lower than the other two groups. In terms of indirect care, three of the four most commonly occurring activities (out of a total of eight activities) were similar among groups (patient rounds and team meetings, verbal report/handover and care planning and clinical pathways). The six unit related activities occurred rarely for all groups of nurses. Conclusion: This study suggests that similarities exist in the activities undertaken by ENs and Level 1 RNs, supporting the contention that role boundaries are no longer clearly delineated.

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  • Elder abuse and neglect: Past endeavours as a springboard for the future

    Brook, G. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper traces the emergence of, and responses to, the phenomenon known as elder abuse and neglect in Aotearoa New Zealand and considers where to from here.

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  • Student perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities

    Cronje, T.; Coll, R.K. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents student perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities (‘learning communities’) derived from a cross-case analysis of four case studies across the New Zealand university and polytechnic sectors. Here we explore student expectations and experiences of the higher education sector and canvass their views as to the infrastructure and resources in their institutions of study, and how they see their learning serves their careers aims. Student career aims and perceptions of how their learning addresses these aims is next. Student perceptions of pedagogies employed in their institutions, along with their preferred pedagogies follows; including staff-student interactions and consideration of the importance of practical skill development. The paper finishes by considering student perceptions of support structures and an analysis of their understanding of aspects of the nature of science (NoS) and engineering. The research findings suggest the students become more independent and responsible for their own learning, enjoy smaller class sizes and interactive learning activities such as practical work and tutorials, and stressed the importance of establishing good relationships with their teachers. Polytechnic students were more positive about their learning and felt the more practice features of their learning led to enhanced career prospects. Students from university and polytechnic sectors were aware of formal learning support structures, but only used them as a last resort; instead first working with peers and teachers.

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  • 'Back to the bedside': Graduate level education in critical care

    Hardcastle, J. E. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The need for post registration education for nurses practising at specialty level in critical care environments is widely acknowledged in nursing and educational literature. There is also clear consensus that the ultimate aim of educational preparation and practice development is to improve the delivery of nursing care to patients who are critically ill and provide support for their families. Yet the ‘right’ approach to educational delivery and evaluation is less clear and stimulates considerable debate amongst nursing educators, care providers, learners and regulatory bodies. The need for critical care nurses to apply advanced knowledge and technical skills to complex and dynamic practice situations necessitates the development of critical thinking and a problem-solving approach to clinical practice that can be fostered through education and experience. This paper explores the relationships within teaching, learning and practice development in critical care nursing and questions the popular assumption that ‘post graduate (Master’s level) education fits all’. Discussion focuses on the successful development and implementation of graduate level education for critical care nurses in the South Island of New Zealand and how this development is challenging existing approaches to the provision and evaluation of formal critical care education in New Zealand.

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  • Weaving the threads: Challenges encountered while educating for sustainability in outdoor education

    Irwin, D. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper will explore some of the ways outdoor education has created a difficult environment for the delivery of education for sustainability. The discussion poses a range of challenges that arise when education for sustainability is juxtaposed to traditional subjects, teaching methods, and institutional structures that act to normalise the values of modern society. The paper presents insights taken from a PhD research project that investigates weaving together the threads of education for sustainability and outdoor education.

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  • Dedicated education units: a new way of supporting clinial learning

    Casey, M.; Hale, J.; Jamieson, I.; Sims, D.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A new way of supporting student nurses in their clinical placements has been successfully piloted at Canterbury District Health Board.

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  • DDSWG: direct digital synthesis waveform generator

    Bright. M. J.; Li, Y. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper discusses the development of a direct digital synthesis waveform generator as a forty week project, contributing to over thirty percent of a BEngTech student’s final year grades. The waveform generator uses a numerically controlled oscillator to digitally synthesize standard and arbitrary waveforms up to a frequency of 5MHz, with adjustable output voltage ranging from 5mV(p-p) to 10V(p-p) and DC offset between 5VDC. The 32-bit phase accumulator and the 8-bit phase to amplitude converter were implemented within programmable logic Xilinx’s Spartan-IIE FPGA. With the success of implementing the digital section of the DDS waveform generator and the design flexibility of VHDL and FPGAs, four DDS waveform generators have been synthesized within the FPGA, each with independent wave shape, frequency, and phase control.

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  • To what extent are Maori studying ICT? The policy implementation gap?

    McCarthy, C. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Maori are studying ICT at a disproportionate rate. Maori make up 15% of the New Zealand population yet Maori school leavers are trailing the success tables and despite the advent of the Wananga, Maori tertiary students (aged 18 to 24) are declining (Social Report, 2007). Recent government reports are also identifying Maori as having a low level of involvement in ICT (NZ Government Executive, 2000). With the approval of CPIT’s Kaiarahi, this paper examines the current literature on this issue. It also examines the responsibilities under the Treaty of Waitangi, gives a brief overview and analysis of the government policies and strategies involved, and looks at how these responsibilities, policies and strategies are working in practice. Finally this paper suggests the need for in-depth collaborative applied research – both at a local and a national level.

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  • Critical incident technique: A user's guide for nurse researchers

    Schluter, J.; Seaton, P.; Chaboyer, W. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    1. This paper contributes to the use of the Critical Incident Technique research methodology in healthcare. The impact of the larger programme of health workforce research is extended through this paper by the methodological guidance it offers researchers in this field. 2. The Journal of Advanced Nursing is a leading international peer reviewed nursing journal that is widely indexed in 32 international databases. 3. The journal has an impact factor of 1.54. ISI journal citations ranks this journal as ninth out of eighty five nursing social science journals. 4. This paper has been recorded in Google scholar as being cited in other publications in the international nursing literature 38 times demonstrating its contribution to developing and refining the methodological body of knowledge. Furthermore the methodology has the potential to be transferable to research with other health professions.

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  • Facilitating learning by using case studies

    MacGregor, A.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A number of issues can result in institutions seeking alternatives to industry based capstone projects in the final semester or year of three year qualifications in information and communications technology (ICT), whether they be three year degree programmes or diploma programmes such as the level 7 Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT – Level 7), formerly called the National Diploma in Business Computing (NDBC). One issue documented has been large numbers of international students as documented by a number of writers including Chard and Wempe (2004), Baker and Nesbit (2006). The issue giving rise to this paper is where a small institution has built links with industry based clients through the offering of DipICT Level 7 projects, but due to a decline in student numbers has ceased the offering of the DipICT Level 7 programme. There was however a desire to maintain the relationships that had been built with the industry based clients. The aim of this paper is to investigate the pitfalls and promise of using client case studies in a simulated work environment to fulfil learning outcome requirements in DipICT Level 6 courses so that these relationships can be maintained with industry based clients. The framework used is small classes, full work days, multiple courses being taught at the same time and multiple clients. The framework used is described. A trial implementation is reported on, and feedback analysed from client, student, tutor and administrative views. Given this feedback, modifications to the process are suggested. The paper then discusses whether there is promise for investigating using these methods in a larger situation.

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  • The capabilities approach and appraising community development programmes in Christchurch

    Schischka, J. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper summarises the results of a participatory appraisal methodology study carried out with groups of participants in two Christchurch based community development programmes - Sydenham Community Development Project and Manuka Cottage in Addington. Based on the capabilities approach of economist Amartya Sen the methodology extends strategies used in previous studies of participant perspectives in development initiatives in Vanuatu and Samoa. Analysis of the transcripts of the focus groups conducted in these studies reveals significant outcomes from both programmes. Particularly important was the ability of the participatory methodology used to gain the perspectives of a wide range of participants, a number of whom are marginalised from mainstream society. The predominant views among participants in all groups are reported. The prevailing sense of local ownership of both programmes together with the reputation of the community development workers are key motivators in attracting people to the projects and retaining their involvement. Discussion is provided of the limitations and difficulties encountered during the course of the study. A major theme in all of the discussions was that participants had experienced a significant increase in their confidence. Many saw their time in the programmes as very important means in becoming more involved in the community and making new contacts.

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  • International students and cooperative industry projects in ICT education: a study of impact factors

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the outcome of initial stages of a study on factors than can impact (positively or negatively) upon success of international students’ (in this case Chinese) studies overseas - with a focus on projects that require considerable self initiation, self discipline and self learning. Cooperative industry projects were chosen to conduct this study. Phase one involved observing the performance of 16 graduating students and collecting data throughout two semesters. The outcome of this phase (even though not yet final) indicates that despite popular belief (that language and cultural differences are significant barriers to Chinese students’ success), willingness, interest in topic and commitment play a crucial role in success of Chinese students in completing cooperative industry projects.

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  • Rationalising Student Numbers in Degree and Diploma Courses: The CPIT Experience

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) delivers both its three year BICT degree and the two year level 6 DipICT programme in parallel with sufficient student numbers to justify the two separate programmes. Both qualifications even go so far as to have three areas of specialisation or streams – network administration, programming and multimedia. However, from time to time, there have been subject areas in one or both of the two programmes specialisation areas that have been low enough to make it difficult to justify to CPIT administrators running some of these courses. The fact that these subject areas were required by industry became increasingly difficult to satisfy the administrators’ requirements to meet budgetary constraints. The Programme Leaders of the two programmes of study examined ways and means to provide students with a range of course and specialisation choices that also satisfied industry’s need for graduates and the administrators’ budgetary compliance requirements. This paper looks at the various proposals created by the two Programme Leaders over the past two years.

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  • Literature review on online assessment authentication

    McCarthy, C. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    While it is acknowledged that much more has been written on this subject than can be reviewed here, every effort has been made to search for and review those works that were deemed by the author and others to have the closest relationship to the issues of online assessment and authentication of such online assessment when developing online courses and programmes of study at CPIT.

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