4,577 results for 2009

  • Intentionalism, Intentionality and Reporting Beliefs

    Mitrovic, Branko (2009)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The dominant view of twentieth century analytic philosophy has been that all thinking is always in a language; that languages are vehicles of thought. In recent decades, however, the opposite view, that languages merely serve to express language-­‐independent thought-­‐contents or propositions, has been more widely accepted. The debate has a direct equivalent in the philosophy of history: when historians report the beliefs of historical figures, do they report the sentences or propositions that these historical figures believed to be true or false? In this paper I argue in favor of the latter, intentionalist, view. My arguments mostly center on the problems with translations that are likely to arise when a historian reports the beliefs of historical figures who expressed them in languages other than the one in which the historian is writing. In discussing these problems the paper presents an application of John Searle’s theory of intentionality on the philosophy of history. The debate between the view that all thinking is verbal and always in a language and the view that human beings think independently of any language (using their languages merely in order to express their thoughts) has had an extensive history in the philosophy of language for the past hundred years. It also has numerous implications for the philosophy of history, where the problem can be stated in general terms as the question of whether a historian, when reporting the beliefs of historical figures, reports the thought-­‐contents (conceived as independent of the language in which they were articulated) or the sentences that these people believed to be true or false. Among English-­‐speaking historians of philosophy, the latter view was promoted by Arthur Danto, the former by Quentin Skinner and Mark Bevir. Both positions are reflected in specific problems of history-­‐writing, such as, for instance, the question whether and how a historian can report the beliefs of historical figures who articulated them in languages different from the language in which the historian is writing. Both positions also fundamentally rely on the assumption that it is possible and legitimate to provide translations of sentences from one language to another when reporting the beliefs of historical figures; but, as we shall see, they are not on equal footing when it comes to explaining what counts as a legitimate translation. This paper explores the implications that these two views on the role of language in human thinking have for the philosophy of history. It will show that the view that all human thinking is verbal is not compatible with some fundamental and standard practices of history-­‐writing. Thus, the paper can be seen as a contribution to the debate about intentionalism in history-­‐writing. It argues in favor of the intentionalist approach by introducing new arguments derived from the philosophy of language, while at the same time proposing a formulation of the intentionalist position that relies on John Searle’s philosophical elaboration on the concept of intentionality.

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  • The Maori cultural institution of hui : when meeting means more than a meeting.

    O'Sullivan, John; Mills, Colleen (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Within all societies individuals gather together for various reasons and in a variety of ways for events that can be collectively termed “meetings”. The Māori cultural institution termed hui is often translated into English as a meeting (Cormack, 2000, Ryan, 2001). Using Volkema and Niederman’s (1996) input/ context-process-output model of the meeting, hui, as described by expert Māori informants, is compared with how Western corporate meetings are depicted in management and communication textbooks used in New Zealand universities over the last decade. The analysis shows that, while the Western approach to meetings and hui share common features, equating the two forms of communication event is inappropriate and results in the key cultural dimensions of hui being ignored. The authors propose that a more thorough explanation of the forms, functions, and cultural underpinnings of both hui and Western style meetings is required in our tertiary textbooks to ensure our students are adequately prepared for their future roles, which in Aotearoa New Zealand will entail working across Western and Māori group communication settings in an appreciative and informed manner.

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  • Sen's capability approach in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes: promoting successful local application through focus groups

    Schischka, J. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At a theoretical level there has been wide acceptance of Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach (CA) in development. However, questions remain regarding operationalization of the approach within the constraints participants and practitioners and other stakeholders face in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes.

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  • Living in stories: Creative nonfiction as an effective genre to write about death and bereavement

    Arnold, S. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Through the telling of stories and interaction with listener or audience, we give structure to our experience and create order and meaning. Written narrative is, therefore, a medium well suited to exploring the experience of death and bereavement. 'We live in stories, not statistics,' Gilbert says (2002: 223). Parents' stories of their children's deaths serve the same purpose as parents' stories of their living children's ongoing lives. Writing about the death of one's child is a way not only to continue bonds and help other bereaved parents, but also a way to allow the 'wounded storyteller' to give voice to the dead and facilitate catharsis in the teller. Utilising the techniques of creative nonfiction to write such a story, the writer can create a compelling narrative that allows writer and reader to enter 'the space of the story for the other' (Frank 1995: 18). This paper discusses the human affinity with story telling and the reasons the bereaved write their stories. It also defines the genre of creative nonfiction and outlines the history of its development. Finally it examines four creative nonfiction texts that have influenced my own writing on the topic of parental bereavement.

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  • Computing education for sustainability: Madrid and beyond

    Young, A.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Muller, L. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents a synopsis of the report published in Inroads, December 2008, on work started by an international working group at the Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education conference in Madrid in July 2008 and the continuation of that work in the ensuing year. The report presented a policy on Computing Education for Sustainability for adoption by SIGCSE. The original paper presented “results from a survey of Computing Educators who attended ITiCSE 2008 where such a policy statement was mooted” (Mann et al, 2008). It also sets out an action plan to integrate Education for Sustainability into computing education curriculum. This paper draws heavily on the content of the Working Group report 2008.

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  • Do computing students have a different approach to studying?

    Lopez, M.; Clarkson, D.; Fourie, W.; Lopez, D.; Marais, K. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Courses in ICT qualifications have a lower pass rate than other qualifications. We postulate that this might be a result of different pedagogy and that such difference might be reflected in student conceptions of learning. We surveyed students (n=218) from two degree programmes (Nursing and Computing) and one sub-degree programme with a questionnaire based on the ASSIST instrument to identify differences in conceptions of learning, preferences for types of learning, and approaches to studying. We report on the differences we found between the fields of study and consider the implications for teaching.

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  • Recognising excellence in student projects

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    We would like to propose the establishment of an annual publication of student projects. This publication would be reviewed by a panel drown from NACCQ and published in association with the annual conference. Submissions would be invited from all tertiary institutions in New Zealand and would take the form of a two page paper, in a design science format that provides a concise summary of the project. The review will be designed to enforce a minimum standard but resubmissions will be invited from those who do not initially meet the standard.

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  • Incorporation of the invasive mallow Lavatera arborea into the food web of an active seabird island

    Hawke, D.; Clark, J. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This study investigated the role of the invasive mallow Lavatera arborea in the terrestrial ecosystem of a flourishing seabird island in SE New Zealand using natural abundance stable isotope ratios (13C/12C; 15N/14N, reported as d13C and d15N). Foliage samples of L. arborea came from transects encompassing three distinct environments (plateau, slope, storm-washed flat) across the island. Samples of potential marine nutrient sources (beach-cast kelp; seabirds using the island) were also collected, to contextualise the L. arborea data. Samples of invertebrate taxa (exotic and indigenous) from multiple ecosystem guilds were hand-collected; a bee, a sapsucking Homoptera, a litter-feeding tenebrionid beetle, various carrion-feeding flies, a predatory carabid beetle, a salticid spider, and (from a seabird cadaver) Dermestes sp. exuviae. Discarded skins from the gecko Hoplodactylus maculatus were collected from moulting sites. Highly enriched d15N values showed that L. arborea from all three environments utilised seabird N, even though breeding seabirds were absent from the storm-washed flat. The isotopic signatures of the Homoptera, and the tenebrionid and carabid beetles could be accounted for entirely by food webs based on L. arborea. Bee and salticid spider isotopic signatures could be accounted for by varying contributions from L. arborea. The flies and Dermestes were (as expected) linked to carrion from either the island or the adjacent mainland. In contrast, gecko data indicated direct dependence on seabirds, although the exact relationship was unclear. Our study therefore showed that L. arborea is an integral part of the terrestrial ecosystem of the island across multiple trophic levels from pollinators to top-level predators.

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  • Generation Y: Why nursing must retain this workforce

    Jamieson, I. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article was submitted for publication for two reasons. One, to highlight the emerging literature about the attributes of Generation Y workers and concerns about their retention in the nursing workforce, and two, to advertise my doctorial research that was about to start the data collection stage. This literature review added to the body of nursing knowledge by providing useful and up-to-date information about an important workforce issue for nursing, namely the tension occurring due to an ageing and retiring workforce, the ageing population who are placing increasing demands on health care services and the need to recruit and retain young nurses. The literature review will be of interest to nurse educators, nurse managers and nurse employers.

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  • Leaving from and returning to nursing practice: contributing factors

    Jamieson, I.; Taua, C. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Many nurses leave nursing and never return. Others return after a period of time. Given the global shortage of nurses a better understanding of these movements is needed. The present study focused on nurses who had been out of nursing for more than five years, and explored factors that influenced their leaving and return to practice. All the nurses who had undertaken a Competency Assessment Programme at a given New Zealand tertiary institution during 2005 were invited to participate. Of the 70 questionnaires mailed out 32 (44.5%) were completed and returned. Quantitative data were analysed using Microsoft Excel, and the qualitative data were coded and analysed by means of content analysis. For each, leaving and returning, three key issues emerged. Nurses left for personal reasons, to seek a career change, or because of poor working conditions. They returned when they had the personal freedom to do so, for fiscal reasons, or because they were motivated by some sense of unfinished business. These findings indicate that it is important for educators involved with Competency Assessment Programmes to collaborate with employers in ensuring that there are opportunities for re-entry to positive work environments, with a degree of flexibility that suits the demographic characteristics of those nurses returning to practice.

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  • New Zealand and the Pipe Band

    Milosavljevic, D (2009)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Research Overview - Pipe bands = combined bagpipe and drum ensemble. - are globally associated with Scotland and military. Are pipe bands in NZ a culture of NZ or a culture of Scotland?

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  • Identifying the 'New Zealand' in Pipe Bands

    Milosavljevic, D (2009)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Overview - Pipe bands = combined bagpipe and drum ensemble. Globally associated with Scotland and military. Questions - What do New Zealand pipe bands represent? Has localisation created a distinctive cultural identity for New Zealand pipe bands?

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  • Bullying the boss : upwards bullying as a response to destructive supervisory leadership in the workplace.

    Wallace, Belinda (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Despite a growing acknowledgement of the negative outcomes for organizational functioning and the health and well-being of individuals attributable to workplace bullying, research into the phenomenon of upward bullying (supervisors bullied by their subordinates), particularly its aetiology, has received modest attention. The aim of the present study was to explore the link between destructive supervisory leadership and upward bullying and the mediating or moderating roles of perceived interactional justice, continuance commitment and workrelated meaning in this relationship. Two hundred and eight post-graduate students and two hundred and four work-based subordinate employees completed an on-line survey of their perceptions of the leadership style and interactional justice of their immediate supervisor, the levels of their own continuance commitment and work-related meaning, and the frequency with which they engaged in specific bullying behaviours targeting their supervisor. As expected, subordinate perceptions of destructive supervisory leadership were strongly associated with an increased incidence of upward bullying, with the strength of this relationship partially mediated by subordinate perceptions of interactional justice within supervisory interactions. In addition, subordinate levels of continuance commitment and work-related meaning moderated the relationship between subordinate perceptions of interactional justice and the incidence of upward bullying, such that this relationship was intensified when either, or both the level of subordinate continuance commitment or work-related meaning was higher. This paper offers preliminary support for conceptualizing upwards bullying as a retaliatory response to destructive leadership, however due to a reliance on cross-sectional data, inferences of causality cannot be made. Practical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

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  • Re-presenting climate change in the alternative and mainstream press of New Zealand

    Kenix, L.J. (2009)

    Oral Presentations
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • European Union Interregionalism and the Capability-Expectations Gap

    Doidge, M. (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article addresses interregionalism in EU external relations. It considers the nature of interregionalism centred on two functional varieties - an internally focused, capacity building interregionalism and an externally focused, globally active form - and, in broad brush strokes, the evidence for each of these forms in EU interregional strategies. On this basis, it notes a capability-expectations gap in the EU's approach to interregionalism, with a certain dissonance between the Union's apparent acknowledgement of limited regional actorness in its partner groupings on the one hand and, on the other, its coincident high-level expectations as to what is achievable in the context of these relationships. The article concludes by suggesting priority areas for EU interregional strategy.

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  • User-centred mobile navigation system interface development for improved personal geo-identification and navigation

    Delikostidis, I.; van Elzakker, C.P.J.M. (2009)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Introduction Orientating and navigating with the use of mobile navigation systems involves interaction with different sources of information. Landmarks are very important into linking these sources. However, outcomes of user research projects in such fields are not yet fully implemented in the mobile navigation systems that are currently available. Objectives The objectives of this paper are the presentation and explanation of a conceptual model of the interactions between the users of a geo-mobile application, their mental maps, reality and the mobile map displays. This model is used to create a series of guidelines for a usable mobile (carto-) graphic interface which contributes to the implementation of a prototype design solution. Methodology In order to meet the objectives of the research, two main sources of information are used: already existing research literature and the results of the analysis of two of our experiments with real users. The aim of the first experiment was to compare different methodologies for field-based usability testing of geo-mobile applications. Investigating the behaviour of pedestrian visitors to unfamiliar cities while orientating and navigating with the use of already existing geo-mobile applications was the aim of the latter. Results A conceptual design of a user interaction model as well as user interface prototype design solutions for personal geo-identification and navigation can be considered as the concrete outcomes of the research described in this paper. The results also demonstrate the importance of landmarks in the geo-identification and navigation processes of the users. Conclusions Following User-Centred Design in order to develop a more usable mobile cartographic interface for pedestrian navigation can reveal a lot of information regarding the user-environment-system interactions. Several design aspects can be extracted from modeling these interactions that could be used for the prototype development. However, usability testing is needed to determine the success of the followed approach.

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  • Methods and techniques for field-based usability testing of mobile geo-applications

    Delikostidis, I. (2009)

    Theses / Dissertations
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Under the spotlight : private lives of public people in Germany and New Zealand

    Bellitto-Grillo, Massimo. (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • New Zealand copyright law affecting libraries in the information age : the resposibility of libraries to keep the balance : how far should it go?

    Duppelfeld, Monika. (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Name suppression under Section 140 of the Criminal Justice Act 1985 : is the price of justice eternal publicity?

    Edwards, Adam, 1986- (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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