4,562 results for 2009

  • Charles Begg and Company Limited : the story of music in New Zealand is the history of Begg's

    Gleeson, Jean Clare (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 143 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "December 2009". University of Otago department: History

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  • Intentionalism, Intentionality and Reporting Beliefs

    Mitrovic, Branko (2009)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The dominant view of twentieth century analytic philosophy has been that all thinking is always in a language; that languages are vehicles of thought. In recent decades, however, the opposite view, that languages merely serve to express language-­‐independent thought-­‐contents or propositions, has been more widely accepted. The debate has a direct equivalent in the philosophy of history: when historians report the beliefs of historical figures, do they report the sentences or propositions that these historical figures believed to be true or false? In this paper I argue in favor of the latter, intentionalist, view. My arguments mostly center on the problems with translations that are likely to arise when a historian reports the beliefs of historical figures who expressed them in languages other than the one in which the historian is writing. In discussing these problems the paper presents an application of John Searle’s theory of intentionality on the philosophy of history. The debate between the view that all thinking is verbal and always in a language and the view that human beings think independently of any language (using their languages merely in order to express their thoughts) has had an extensive history in the philosophy of language for the past hundred years. It also has numerous implications for the philosophy of history, where the problem can be stated in general terms as the question of whether a historian, when reporting the beliefs of historical figures, reports the thought-­‐contents (conceived as independent of the language in which they were articulated) or the sentences that these people believed to be true or false. Among English-­‐speaking historians of philosophy, the latter view was promoted by Arthur Danto, the former by Quentin Skinner and Mark Bevir. Both positions are reflected in specific problems of history-­‐writing, such as, for instance, the question whether and how a historian can report the beliefs of historical figures who articulated them in languages different from the language in which the historian is writing. Both positions also fundamentally rely on the assumption that it is possible and legitimate to provide translations of sentences from one language to another when reporting the beliefs of historical figures; but, as we shall see, they are not on equal footing when it comes to explaining what counts as a legitimate translation. This paper explores the implications that these two views on the role of language in human thinking have for the philosophy of history. It will show that the view that all human thinking is verbal is not compatible with some fundamental and standard practices of history-­‐writing. Thus, the paper can be seen as a contribution to the debate about intentionalism in history-­‐writing. It argues in favor of the intentionalist approach by introducing new arguments derived from the philosophy of language, while at the same time proposing a formulation of the intentionalist position that relies on John Searle’s philosophical elaboration on the concept of intentionality.

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  • Effect of estradiol on the ovarian surface epithelium in older mice

    Gulliver, Linda Shirley Mabelle (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    2 v. (xxxii, 573 leaves) :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "August 2009". University of Otago department: Anatomy and Structural Biology

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  • The gift of the other: Levinas, Derrida, and a theology of hospitality

    Shepherd, Andrew Philip (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Despite the celebration of 'difference' and the rhetoric of 'connectedness', the so-called 'global village' of the early twenty-first century is far from a peaceful and harmonious reality. Powerful ideological discourses such as the market and the political 'war on terror' shape a world in which many, classified as Others, are excluded. Conceived of as abstract commodities competing for limited resources, or worse, as potential 'terrorists' coming to 'destroy civilization', Others are seen as threats. In this world of exclusion and hostility the Christian church is summoned to continue to witness to the good news of God's gracious hospitality. The practice of 'hospitality' -what Christine Pohl refers to as 'an essential part of Christian identity' - is, however, rendered problematic due to the emasculation and distortion of the term by the prevailing ideologies of our time. To engage in this historical and life-giving practice faithfully therefore requires a theological rehabilitation of the concept of 'hospitality'. This thesis undertakes this rehabilitative task in two ways. Firstly, the work engages with the work of prominent French philosophers Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida. In contrast to Cartesian western philosophical thought which has given primacy to the cogito, Levinas and Derrida claim that the self is constituted by the call of the Other. Instead of disregard or fear of the Other, their 'philosophies of hospitality' assert that authentic human existence is characterised by an 'infinite responsibility' before the face of the Other. While finding rich resources in Levinasian and Derridean thought, there are weaknesses and limitations in their respective understandings of selfhood, inter-human relationality, eschatology and teleology, and the differential ontology upon which their ethical philosophies are grounded. Therefore, while continuing the dialogue with Levinas and Derrida, section two of this thesis offers an explicitly theological account of 'hospitality'. Whereas Levinasian-Derridean thought implies that tension and hostility are both ontologically intrinsic and insurmountable, the Christian doctrines of Trinity, creation, and sin offer an ontology of primordial communion in which hostility is understood as arising from the failure of humanity to live in communion with others. This hostility is overcome in the 'once for all' death of Jesus. This sacrificial and substitutionary action, far from sacralising violence and turning suffering into a virtue, prevails over human enmity and offers the true form of personhood. Those who through faith accept this 'gift of God' are indwelt by the presence of the Spirit of the resurrected Christ and incorporated into a new form of sociality - the ecclesia. The alienated self, discomforted by the disturbing Other, undergoes a makeover and is transformed into an ecclesial self; expanded to 'make room' for otherness. Fear is replaced by love, and appropriative desire gives way to mutual gift-exchange. Undergoing this gradual transformation, the ecclesia is empowered to participate in God's redemptive purposes being enacted in the world and thus becomes a witness to God's hospitality.

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  • Assessing the impact of human disturbance on penguins

    Ellenberg, Ursula (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xix, 257 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.

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  • Spirituality in New Zealand hospice care

    Egan, Richard Michael Martin (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xv, 362 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "July 2009". University of Otago department: General Practice

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  • Practising Tamariki 'Āngai : Mangaia's informal island adoption

    Dodson, Marsa A (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xv, 410 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Social Work and Community Development. "21 August 2009." Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • "Body snatching" in contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand : a legal conflict between cultures

    Brandt, Bettina (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The main purpose of this thesis is to consider whether legal sanctions would be capable of deterring the practice of "body snatching," and, if so, whether the law should be reformed in New Zealand to clarify the legal situation of ownership in, and burial of, a dead body. The project will involve an analysis of existing law, proposed law changes, tikanga Māori, and comparative law elements. It will examine and synthesise primary and secondary legal sources, including relevant case law and statutory law. More specifically, the research aim is to provide an explanation of the legal aspects of the "body snatching" issue within Aotearoa/New Zealand, as it occurs within bicultural Māori and Pākehā families. [Extract from Introduction]

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  • Open population capture-recapture models and diabetes in Otago

    Cameron, Claire (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 207 leaves :ill., ; 30 cm Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Mathematics and Statistics

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  • The search for 'self' for lifestyle travellers

    Cohen, Scott Allen (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: ix, 186 leaves : maps. ; 30 cm. Notes: "February 27th 2009". University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2009. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Beyond consultation: Getting good outcomes for everyone in cross-cultural resource consent practice

    Kanawa, Lisa; Stephenson, Janet; O'Brien, Marg (2009)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    When the Resource Management Act (RMA) was introduced in 1991 it brought in new requirements for the consideration of Māori knowledge and values. Nearly 20 years on, consultation with Māori has become a normal part of the resource consent process, and many best practice guidelines are available on how to consult. Less attention has been paid to what a good outcome might look like and how this might be achieved. Our research seeks to identify what makes for good resource consent processes where Māori knowledge and values are given appropriate consideration and inclusion in the process and outcomes. We report here on the first four stages of a 3-year research process. Firstly, a review of formal national guidelines on consultation and incorporating Māori values in decision making. Secondly, analysis of Environment Court decisions and how the court deals with Māori witnesses and their knowledge. Thirdly, interviews with Māori and Pākehā (New Zealanders of European descent) involved in resource consent processes in a variety of roles. Finally, we discuss a case study of a “win–win” situation in which both the hapū (kinship group) and the developer of a significant coastal development are happy with the process and outcomes in a situation where significant cultural values were at stake.

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  • The protection of terrestrial biological diversity and climate change : an environmental law perspective

    Hederich, Wiebke (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiii, 182 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "16 October 2009". University of Otago department: Law

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  • Kia Whakamaramatia Mahi Titi : Predictive measures for understanding harvest impacts on Sooty Shearwaters (Puffinus griseus)

    Clucas, Rosemary (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    1 v. (various pagings) :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "July 26, 2009". University of Otago department: Mathematics and Statistics

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  • Alleviating fuel poverty in NZ through improving the energy efficiency of the residential sector

    Callaú, Maria Fernanda (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 175 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Physics

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  • The Maori cultural institution of hui : when meeting means more than a meeting.

    O'Sullivan, John; Mills, Colleen (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Within all societies individuals gather together for various reasons and in a variety of ways for events that can be collectively termed “meetings”. The Māori cultural institution termed hui is often translated into English as a meeting (Cormack, 2000, Ryan, 2001). Using Volkema and Niederman’s (1996) input/ context-process-output model of the meeting, hui, as described by expert Māori informants, is compared with how Western corporate meetings are depicted in management and communication textbooks used in New Zealand universities over the last decade. The analysis shows that, while the Western approach to meetings and hui share common features, equating the two forms of communication event is inappropriate and results in the key cultural dimensions of hui being ignored. The authors propose that a more thorough explanation of the forms, functions, and cultural underpinnings of both hui and Western style meetings is required in our tertiary textbooks to ensure our students are adequately prepared for their future roles, which in Aotearoa New Zealand will entail working across Western and Māori group communication settings in an appreciative and informed manner.

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  • Sen's capability approach in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes: promoting successful local application through focus groups

    Schischka, J. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At a theoretical level there has been wide acceptance of Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach (CA) in development. However, questions remain regarding operationalization of the approach within the constraints participants and practitioners and other stakeholders face in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes.

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  • Living in stories: Creative nonfiction as an effective genre to write about death and bereavement

    Arnold, S. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Through the telling of stories and interaction with listener or audience, we give structure to our experience and create order and meaning. Written narrative is, therefore, a medium well suited to exploring the experience of death and bereavement. 'We live in stories, not statistics,' Gilbert says (2002: 223). Parents' stories of their children's deaths serve the same purpose as parents' stories of their living children's ongoing lives. Writing about the death of one's child is a way not only to continue bonds and help other bereaved parents, but also a way to allow the 'wounded storyteller' to give voice to the dead and facilitate catharsis in the teller. Utilising the techniques of creative nonfiction to write such a story, the writer can create a compelling narrative that allows writer and reader to enter 'the space of the story for the other' (Frank 1995: 18). This paper discusses the human affinity with story telling and the reasons the bereaved write their stories. It also defines the genre of creative nonfiction and outlines the history of its development. Finally it examines four creative nonfiction texts that have influenced my own writing on the topic of parental bereavement.

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  • Computing education for sustainability: Madrid and beyond

    Young, A.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Muller, L. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents a synopsis of the report published in Inroads, December 2008, on work started by an international working group at the Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education conference in Madrid in July 2008 and the continuation of that work in the ensuing year. The report presented a policy on Computing Education for Sustainability for adoption by SIGCSE. The original paper presented “results from a survey of Computing Educators who attended ITiCSE 2008 where such a policy statement was mooted” (Mann et al, 2008). It also sets out an action plan to integrate Education for Sustainability into computing education curriculum. This paper draws heavily on the content of the Working Group report 2008.

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  • Do computing students have a different approach to studying?

    Lopez, M.; Clarkson, D.; Fourie, W.; Lopez, D.; Marais, K. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Courses in ICT qualifications have a lower pass rate than other qualifications. We postulate that this might be a result of different pedagogy and that such difference might be reflected in student conceptions of learning. We surveyed students (n=218) from two degree programmes (Nursing and Computing) and one sub-degree programme with a questionnaire based on the ASSIST instrument to identify differences in conceptions of learning, preferences for types of learning, and approaches to studying. We report on the differences we found between the fields of study and consider the implications for teaching.

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  • Recognising excellence in student projects

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    We would like to propose the establishment of an annual publication of student projects. This publication would be reviewed by a panel drown from NACCQ and published in association with the annual conference. Submissions would be invited from all tertiary institutions in New Zealand and would take the form of a two page paper, in a design science format that provides a concise summary of the project. The review will be designed to enforce a minimum standard but resubmissions will be invited from those who do not initially meet the standard.

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