5,383 results for 2010

  • Analysis of fungal inteins

    Bokor, Annika Anna Maria (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xxvi, 298 leaves :col. ill ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Biochemistry. "November 1, 2010"

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  • Remineralisation of decalcified tooth enamel consequent to orthodontic treatment

    Lam, Emily (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xx, 253 leaves : col. ill ; 30 cm. Notes: “A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Orthodontics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand”. "August 2010". University of Otago department: Oral Sciences. Thesis ( D. Clin. Dent. )--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Incunabula in Special Collections, University of Otago Library

    Kerr, Donald (2010)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Special Collections, University of Otago Library, houses 42 examples of pre-1501 early printed books that represent 15th century printmanship from Italy, German, Switzerland, and France. There is one highly unusual English sample: four binding fragments printed by William Caxton, and John Lettou, about 1480 and bound in a 1481 edition of Nicolas de Lyra’s Commentaria in bibliam (no.7). There is a selection of printers, ranging from Johann Amerbach, Peter Drach, Ulrich Han, and Georg Husner to Anton Koberger, Aldus Manuitus, Johann Mentelin, and Johannes Trechsel. Operating from European towns such as Basel, Speyer, Rome, Strassburg, Nuremberg, Venice, Strassburg, and Lyon, their productions reflect their expertise and resources in this burgeoning industry. Typefaces, style, and quality of printing and bookmaking also vary. Indeed, the collection contains items that are typographical masterpieces (no. 7); others are downright pedestrian. Barring one book in German and another in Latin and Greek, all of the other books are in Latin, the predominant language for the printed word before 1500. Given that most of the books are tied to established bibliographies, the descriptions attached are brief. However, the descriptions are grounded in the books at Otago, especially to condition and provenance. There has been some modernization of letters. References used follow the catalogue listing, as do printer and location indexes. Images accompany most entries, offering a brief glimpse of the book and its make-up. They highlight bindings, decorations such as woodcut initials and illustrations, title-page samples, rubrications, typefaces, colophons and printer’s devices, and provenance and bibliographical information (often on endpapers). Notable highlights include Liber chronicarum (The Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493), Boccaccio’s De genealogiae deorum gentilium, an encyclopedia of pagan gods, a book of medical aphorisms translated from Arabic in to Latin (1484), the Aldine printing of Institutiones Graecae Grammaticae (1497), and a leaf of the Nuremberg Bible, printed by Anton Koberger, 1483. The prime purpose of this descriptive list is to raise the awareness of the existence of these books in New Zealand (and at the University of Otago, Dunedin) and encourage scholarly use in them. Like their vellum counter-parts, the medieval manuscripts, these survivors of a bygone age have their own distinct beauty and specific usefulness, be it textual or physical. They stand as very useful resources, especially to Early Modern scholars. Special thanks to Dr Christopher de Hamel (Parker Library, Cambridge); John Goldfinch (British Library); Dr Falk Eisermann (State Library, Berlin); Klaus Graf (University of Freiburg), Michael Laird (Texas), Bettina Wagner (Bavarian State Library, Munich); and Anthony Tedeschi (University of Melbourne Special Collections). No list is without flaws. To this end, feedback is appreciated, either through email, letter, or in person. I welcome comments and suggestions.

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  • No substantial miscarriage of justice : the history and application of the proviso to Section 385(1) of the Crimes Act 1961

    Downs, Mathew David (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 390 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "September 2010. University of Otago department: Law

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  • Effects of ocean acidification on fertilisation and early development in polar and temperate marine invertebrates

    Ericson, Jessica (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    243 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography. University of Otago department: Marine Science.

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  • Tourism policy implementation in the Philippines, 1973-2009

    de la Santa, Edieser (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xv, 362 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes :University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Perception in the rural designing within the rural New Zealand landscape

    Borsos, Chanelle J. (2010)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project explores how perception can be used to facilitate design within the rural landscape of New Zealand. From the earliest days of European settlement, the environmental history of New Zealand's rural landscapes has been a record of confrontation of image and reality. Historically ideas on Landscape have been painted, and through this, societies form landscape taste and values. When European settlers came to New Zealand they used these perceptions when forming their landscapes and this explains how they transformed from wild wilderness to what we see today. The current theory on landscape perception is that it is necessary to gain a better understanding of people's values and landscape tastes when designing in these landscapes . It is not simply a matter of imposing any design on these communities as they will not be embraced. This is the key to sustaining new landscape ideas as scenic perception of landscape is divorced from an understanding of ecological processes. This project reveals that If landscape architects understand what underpins aesthetic preferences in terms of perception and respond with a creative articulation of environmentally sustainable landscape designs, in a way which allows people to maintain a connection with it, the land­ scape will be more resilient. For landscape architecture , it represents a challenge to the popular preferences for the ornamental , groomed and controlled landscapes which reflected the legacy of designers such as Capability Brown and Frederick Law Olmsted. Project site: South Head Kaipara, north of Helensville.

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  • The Burton Brothers studio : commerce in photography and the marketing of New Zealand, 1866-1898

    Whybrew, Christine M. (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The Burton Brothers studio of Dunedin, the most renowned ofNew Zealand's colonial photographers, was among the first to present photographs of colonial New Zealand to international audiences. From 1866 to 1898 this studio produced a stock of photographic images that recorded the industrial, social and political progress of the colony. Burton Brothers photographs were produced in series and included topographical views of locations, such as Milford Sound and the King Country, or were targeted to specific projects or events, such as the eruption of Mount Tarawera and the government survey of the Sutherland Falls. Alfred Henry Burton, the studio's director, accompanied the Union Steam Ship Company's first tourist excursion to Fiji, Samoa and Tonga, and photographs from this series and those of King Country Maori are valued as ethnographic records of indigenous peoples. Now prized as documentary artefacts in institutional collections, the "truth" value of these photographs is compromised by their production as marketable commodities. By examining the intended purpose that informed the creation and distribution of these photographs, this thesis disrupts conventional interpretations of Burton Brothers photographs as historical records. This thesis examines photographs as physical objects, prioritising the material properties of the photograph over image content. This methodology is informed and guided by the close and systematic study of Burton Brothers photographs in their original formats, including albumen prints, cartes de visite, stereographs, lantern slides, albums and the studio's original wet collodion and gelatin dry plate negatives. All prints released by the studio were inscribed with the firm's trademark (brand), negative number and a descriptive caption. Each series of photographs was promoted by a non-illustrated catalogue, containing an excerpt from the photographer's diary or other written narrative that operated as contextual description for the photographs. These textual elements function to direct interpretation in accordance with the studio's commercial agenda and in alignment with contemporary social and political ideologies. The impression of New Zealand circulated by Burton Brothers photographs was derived more from the text accompanying and overlaying these photographic products than the image content. This "textual overlay" allows insight into the studio's purpose m producing, releasing and marketing photographic products. Through this, the context of production is analysed and Burton Brothers photographs are examined as products of commercial endeavour, accessing a greater understanding of the commercial photography trade in nineteenth century New Zealand.

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  • Sing No Sad Songs

    Arnold, S. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Towards a social ontology of improvised sound work

    Russell, B. (2010)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Improvised sound work is one of the key areas of inter-generic hybridity in contemporary music. Any attempt to identify a social role and agree on a cultural meaning for such improvisational practice must grapple first with issues of definition. These issues are especially acute for emerging hybrid practices because their practical development outstrips the ability of the available critical/ideological structures to provide useful and generally agreed definitions for them.

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  • What influences practice nurses to participate in post-registration education?

    Richardson, A.; Gage, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Introduction: There is a need for educated primary health nurses to develop their practice, educational and career pathways in response to opportunities emerging from the Primary Health Care Strategy (PHCS). This study aimed to explore the opportunities and constraints encountered by practice nurses when participating in post-registration education. Methods: This study used exploratory qualitative design, incorporating focus group interviews with 16 practice nurses employed by Pegasus Health, Christchurch. Qualitative thematic analysis used a general inductive approach. Findings: Seven key themes emerged, including motivation to learn, enablers for learning and challenges to accessing education. Practice nurses also described their changing roles with clients and their vision for practice nursing in the future. Conclusion: This study considered accessibility of post-registration education for practice nurses and the extent to which they are embracing these opportunities in order to meet their practice needs. The PHCS states that primary health care nursing is crucial to its implementation. Successful expansion of primary health care nursing roles rests on the development of educational qualifications and skills, as well as career frameworks. It is envisaged that, with strong leadership and research skills resulting from professional development, practice nurses will be more able to reduce health inequalities. Study findings indicate that practice nurses are rising to the challenge of expanding their roles and engaging in post-registration education. They are more likely to pursue this if constraints are minimised and support increased. Currently practice nurses make significant contributions to primary health care and have the potential for an even greater contribution in the future.

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  • ICT4D: working with communities for ICT enabled change

    Young, A.; Clear, T.; McCarthy, C.; Muller, L. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Computing student views on sustainability: a snapshot

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    UNESCO launched the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development for 2005-2014 with the aim of integrating Education doe Sustainable Development (ESD) into all aspects of education and learning. The motivation for this study was to inform our decisions on embedding ESD into our teaching. Incoming computing students (n=116) were surveyed to capture their viewd on sustaunability before they engaged in formal learning and these views were compared to those of computing students at another institution. The study explored views on the relevance of sustainability to their study, sustainability [riorities and knowledge, possible actions they could take, their capacity to take these actions and make a difference, and how they would deal with a challenging scenario. Students were pro-ecological but did not believe they had the capability to make a difference. Significant variation was found in attitudes and cvalues across the various ethnicities in our sample, suggesting that careful consideration should be given to this aspect. This study adds to the emerging body of knowledge around sustainability perceptions and values of incoming students and informs curriculum for the embedding of ESD into education and learning.

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  • Narrative strategies regarding Japanese ethnic origins and cultural identities in Japanese middle-school history textbooks

    Nishino, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article examines how middle school history textbooks published between 1951 and 1995 explain the origins of the Japanese as an ethnic group (minzoku). The analysis shows that despite the relatively long period from which the sample of textbooks was taken, these texts continue to emphasize two categories of Japanese identity: a biologically heterogeneous people through prehistoric immigration and a unifi ed language. Building on the latter theme, the textbooks continued to treat the innovation of the kana as a quintessential development underlying the Japanese cultural achievement. The analysis reveals that the narrative tone shifted from being emotive in the early 1950s texts to somewhat muted in later decades.

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  • Isotopic signatures (13C/12C; 15N/14N) of blue penguin burrow soil invertebrates: Carbon sources and trophic relationships

    Hawke, D.; Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Seabird burrows provide a soil environment for processing discards such as feathers and guano, hence constituting a primaryinterface between the sea and the land. This studyinvolved collection and culturing of soil invertebrates from three blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) burrows, and examined their 13C/12C and 15N/14N isotopic composition in relation to potential burrow resources (terrestrial plant litter, burrow soil, guano, blue penguin feathers). Two taxa (cerylonid beetles and small tineid moth larvae) had a depleted 13C/12C indicative of a level of dependence on C from terrestrial soil. Tineid moth larvae (Monopis crocicapitella and (or) M. ethelella) substantiallyincreased their 13C/12C enrichment during development, implying increasing dependence on marine C. Remaining taxa, both decomposers and predators, had 13C/12C intermediate between guano and feathers. Larval and emergent fleas had the most enriched 13C/12C, indicative of a greater dependence on feather C and the likelihood of co-processing with guano. Pseudoscorpions and histerid beetles had overlapping isotopic enrichments implying competition for prey, but were spatially separated in burrow soil. With their highly enriched 15N/14N and marine 13C/12C, larvae and protonymphs of the histiostomatid mite Myianoetus antipodus stood alone. Blue penguin burrows therefore support a diverse invertebrate fauna that incorporates terrestrial soil as well as varying proportions of the various blue penguin discards.

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  • Improving capacity for evidence-based practice in South East Asia: evaluating the role of research fellowships in the SEA-ORCHID Project

    Short, J.; McDonald, S.; Turner, T.; Martis, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Fellowships are a component of many professional education programs. They provide opportunities to develop skills and competencies in an environment where time is protected and resources and technical support are more readily available. The SEA-ORCHID fellowships program aimed to increase capacity for evidence-based practice and research synthesis, and to encourage fellows to become leaders in these areas.

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  • A new histiostomatid mite (Acari: Astigmatina: Histiostomatidae) from blue penguin burrows

    Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Histiostoma mantelli new species is described and illustrated from females and males collected from moulting burrows of blue penguin Eudyptula minor at Tongaporutu, North Taranaki, New Zealand.

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  • A new species of Carpoglyphus (Astigmatina: Carpoglyphidae) from the bark of black beech (Nothofagus) honeydew in New Zealand.

    Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Carpoglyphus wardleorum n. sp. (Astigmatina: Carpoglyphidae) is described from males and females collected from sooty mould fungi on the bark of black beech, Nothofagus solandri, at Ashley Gorge, Canterbury, New Zealand.

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  • Stability of plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH): Influence of hemolysis, rapid chilling time, and the addition of maleimide

    Livesey, J. H.; Dolamore, B. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of hemolysis, rapid chilling, time, and the addition of a maleimide on the stability of human plasma ACTH measurements. Design and methods: Partially hemolyzed EDTA blood (n = 10), initially at 37 °C, was centrifuged at 4 °C either immediately or after rapid chilling in ice/water. Plasma ACTH was then measured either immediately, or after 1 h at 22 °C with or without the addition of 2 mM N-phenyl maleimide (NPM). Results: For 0.2% hemolysis compared to no hemolysis, the mean (±SEM) loss with immediate centrifugation and immediate ACTH measurement was 11 ± 1%. This loss was significantly (p < 0.002) reduced to 6 ± 1% by an initial rapid chilling of the samples. For analysis after 1 h at 22 °C, the addition of NPM decreased the loss of ACTH from 15 ± 2% to 2 ± 2% (p < 0.002). Conclusion: Rapid chilling, prompt analysis, and addition of NPM can each reduce the interference of hemolysis in the measurement of plasma ACTH concentrations.

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  • Process and strategy influences on product development performance in New Zealand

    de Waal, A.; Knott, P. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This study is the first to evaluate the outcomes of alternative new product development (NPD) strategies among New Zealand firms. For each of six distinct NPD strategies, we assess performance by selecting the most applicable of 12 measures. We find that new product strategies produce better results than product improvement strategies, although managers rated profit margins unsatisfactory for all six NPD strategies. Our sample firms seldom reported using formalised NPD process or strategy, but when they did, this correlated positively with improved performance in all 12 measures. Firms generally recognised their NPD process performance as poorer than their product performance.

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