6,796 results for 2011

  • Akoaga : efficacy, agency, achievement and success in the tertiary sector : focus on students and parents from Pasifika communities

    Marat, Deepa; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Latu, Savae; Aumua, Linda; Talakai, Malia; Sun, Kang (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The term akoaga has a pan-Polynesian origin and meaning. In the Samoan language, the term can be broken into two root words, ako and aga. Ako or ato means basket and aga means measurements associated with weaving.

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  • Mao's cult as an alternative modernity in China.

    Yu, Li (Lydia) (2011)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    As a consequence of the pervasiveness of traditional culture, Mao’s cult originated from the absolutely anti-religious environment during the early period of modern China. As a response to the modernization in today’s China, Mao’s cult has became a new tradition and evolved into a modern mode of Chinese popular religion, as well as non-religious patriotism, the legitimacy of the CCP, and Chinese national cohesion. That is to say, the tradition itself was created in the context of modernity, and both tradition and modernity possess only a kind of relative connotation. Therefore, the revival of Mao’s cult in today’s China, in the religious form or non-religious form, manifests the traditional Chinese culture persisting in the modern development of China, and thereby constructs a unique Chinese model of modern development --- an alternative modernity in other words. Therefore the western model might not the best choice for non-Western societies. It is impossible for non-western countries to either abandon their traditional culture to develop a whole new modernity, or to develop a homogenous modernity in accordance with western standards. Furthermore, there is no point arguing the superiority of the western model of development, by comparing western modernity with non-western modernity. Alternative modernities will become important phenomena in our developing world.

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  • Learner Beliefs and Learner Autonomy : A Case Study of Two Chinese Migrant Learners in New Zealand.

    Zhong, Qunyan (Maggie) (2011)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Learner autonomy has received increasing attention in SLA. However, a literature review indicates that empirical studies focusing on the impact of individual learner factors on learner autonomy are scarce. This study employed a naturalistic inquiry (Lincoln & Guba, 1985) to investigate the relationship between two Chinese migrant learners’ beliefs about language learning and their levels of learner autonomy. A number of instruments (interviews, classroom observations, stimulated recall interviews and learning logs) were used to collect triangulated data over an 18-week period. Following standard procedures of qualitative data analysis, the study identified four categories of learners’ beliefs. The results reveal that the learners varied in the beliefs they held about language learning. Some of them were more conducive to learner autonomy while others were at odds. Their beliefs influenced their levels of autonomy. The study suggests that educators should take into account learners’ beliefs when promoting autonomous learning. The paper concludes with some practical instructional recommendations.

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  • Te Hiima : Reverend A. J. Seamer and his Māori mission

    Cervin, Georgia R (2011)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: vi, 59 leaves : ill., ports. ; 30 cm. Notes: Cover title. "October 2011". University of Otago department: History. Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2011. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Skills and people capability in the future state: Needs, barriers and opportunities

    Plimmer, G (2011)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The initial paper in the Future State Project (IPS Working paper 10/08) describes several powerful new trends beginning to impact on public sector management including limited funding, rising public expectations, and more complex problems. But what are the implications of these trends on human resource management (HRM) within the New Zealand public sector? What ideas are emerging within the HRM literature, and how do these relate to the perspectives of practitioners – human resource managers, CEOs and senior executives, and staff – in New Zealand’s public sector organisations? The formal system in New Zealand, focused on improvement of pre-specified and auditable outputs monitored through detailed agency performance plans, may no longer be sufficient for the public sector environment of the future. Instead, new individual and collective capabilities may be needed. Current state servants have been selected, developed and rewarded in an environment which has emphasised stability, control, linear accountability and outputs. In contrast, we will argue that the emerging environment requires adaptability and the ability to work across public, private and non-profit public sector boundaries, locally and internationally. Bottom line accountability for the efficient operations of a tightly defined functional task is fundamentally different from the messiness of managing public sector responses to shifting social and economic challenges which have no easily defined finish lines. We begin this paper with an overview of the current state of skills and people capability in the New Zealand public sector, including employee commitment and engagement, and the impact of the new wave of reforms over the last decade. We then identify several emerging ideas about the future of public sector HRM, including the need to develop better leaders, encourage innovation and collaboration, and take a longer term, more intense effort in capability development. These ideas were explored with practitioners in a series of focus groups in April and May 2011. In this paper, we discuss the results of the focus groups, in which we found general agreement with many of the ideas tabled for discussion but some key differences in perspective between human resource managers, CEOs and senior executives, and staff. We conclude this paper with a discussion of the future of public sector HRM in New Zealand.

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  • Legendary Obscurity: the Working Life of Malcolm Ross

    Plummer, Matthew Robert (2011)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Malcolm Ross (1948-2003) was a sculptor, painter, photographer, cartoonist and historian who operated at one remove from the art world for the entirety of his career. As a consequence, almost no analysis, criticism or writing on his work exists, and his place within this country's history of art has subsequently been overlooked. This thesis seeks to give art historical and analytical attention to Ross's oeuvre, arguing for his status as one of New Zealand's key conceptual practitioners. It traces the thematic threads which recur throughout his work and argues that the diverse range of artistic and historic investigations he undertook are ultimately unified within his archive at the E.H. McCormick Research Library, Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tamaki.

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  • The Christchurch quake: Social networking as student support in disaster recovery

    McCarthy, D.; McCarthy, C. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Following the “Greendale Fault” Earthquake of 7.1 on 4 September, 2010 in Christchurch, New Zealand, students at the local Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) were significantly disrupted in their second semester. Occurring at 4.35am on the Saturday morning after only two weeks of courses, the ITP found itself cordoned off and part of an inner city curfew as older less well maintained buildings were reduced to rubble around it. Aftershocks continued but relatively little damage was sustained to the ITP’s buildings. Students and staff were unable to attend study or work, and the situation was rapidly changing from day to day. However, students were affected differently depending on their location at the time of the quake, their access to communication technologies such as cell phones, the Internet, and their personal circumstances. Then the entire situation repeated itself with the 6.3 “Lyttelton Fault” aftershock at 12.51pm on 22 February, 2011 disrupting Semester One on only the second day of the semester. This paper blends two qualitative methods, actor network theory (ANT) and narrative research to show the degree to which computing students accessed an online course to tell their stories, participate in social networking, and relied upon the School of Computing Moodle Student Info site in the recovery period immediately after the first disaster, and comparing this process over the “Greendale Fault” and the “Lyttelton Fault” events.

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  • Self and peer-assessment: a learner perspective

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M.; Fourie, W.; Clarkson, D.; Marais, K. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Self and peer assessment aid learning and build capabilities that support lifelong learning. However, although both involve learner participation and are often discussed together, they are very different in some respects. This study contrasts learners’ experiences of peer assessment with that of self-assessment. It used a non-experimental post-test only design in which students enrolled in courses with both self-assessment and peerassessment components completed a questionnaire on their experiences. Survey questions were formed into four scales: value, learning, contrasting peer with self and concerns. Additional questions captured basic demographics and conceptions of learning. Participants believed that they learned more from peer assessment than from self-assessment. However, some felt it was not right for other students to mark their work and some felt uncomfortable with the responsibility of marking other’s work. Learners endorsed the notion that peer-assessment has a greater learning value than self-assessment and that they should be more involved in assessing other students. However, they also had concerns about the wider use of self and peer assessment and a minority was strongly opposed to their use.

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  • The fate of computing in research performance evaluations: ERA vs PBRF

    Clear, A.; Clear, T. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The prevailing ‘audit culture’ in national governments has seen a global proliferation of research performance evaluation schemes. Most recently the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) results have been published. The results from this bibliometrically based ranking exercise provide an interesting comparison with the earlier results from New Zealand’s Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF) exercise. With a focus on the computing disciplines this paper sets these developments in the global context; compares the outcomes under each scheme; the extent to which the prevailing publication cultures have been supported or undermined; the scope for such schemes to render whole sub-disciplines invisible and the potential impacts for the computing disciplines from such exercises.

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  • Web-assisted learning: A review of planning and theory

    Clear, A.; Asgarkhani, M. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the outcome of the phase I of a research project (planning and theory of e-learning) that looks at theory of benefits and value of e-learning, planning to achieve perceived benefits and values. Phase II will compare the reality of the outcomes after implementation of e-Learning solutions versus planned outcomes. The paper covers some of the key issues web-assisted or e-learning through discussing the various stages (technologies) of e-learning solutions, potential benefits; the state of the e-learning industry; the barriers to introducing e-learning and building a model to assess strategic value of e-learning through web technologies. It concentrates on literature review, planning and theory mostly related to early 2000 when the e-learning phenomenon really emerged.

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  • Managing operational continuity in disaster recovery: A case in academic delivery

    Clear, A.; Asgarkhani, M. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the experience related to planning approaches that were undertaken to continue delivery of Information and Communication Technologies qualifications at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) after the 22 February earthquake. It reflects on challenges, phases of planning for commencing delivery and key success factors.

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  • Impact of increasing capacity for generating and using research on maternal and perinatal health practices in South East Asia (SEA-ORCHID Project)

    The SEA-ORCHID Study Group; Martis, R. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity remain unacceptably high in many low and middle income countries. SEA-ORCHID was a five year international collaborative project in South East Asia which aimed to determine whether health care and health outcomes for mothers and babies could be improved by developing capacity for research generation, synthesis and use. Methods: Nine hospitals in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand participated in SEA-ORCHID. These hospitals were supported by researchers from three Australian centres. Health care practices and outcomes were assessed for 1000 women at each hospital both before and after the intervention. The capacity development intervention was tailored to the needs and context of each hospital and delivered over an 18 month period. Main outcomes included adherence to forms of care likely to be beneficial and avoidance of forms of care likely to be ineffective or harmful. Results: We observed substantial variation in clinical practice change between sites. The capacity development intervention had a positive impact on some care practices across all countries, including increased family support during labour and decreased perineal shaving before birth, but in some areas there was no significant change in practice and a few beneficial practices were followed less often. Conclusion: The results of SEA-ORCHID demonstrate that investing in developing capacity for research use, synthesis and generation can lead to improvements in maternal and neonatal health practice and highlight the difficulty of implementing evidence-based practice change.

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  • Crafting communities: Promoting inclusion, empowerment and learning between older women

    Maidment, J.; Macfarlane, S. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    While social policy and planning documents are replete with ominous warnings about the cost of an ageing population, this article tells a different story about the productive and self-sustaining networks that exist among older women in the community who do craftwork. From our research conducted in Victoria, Australia during 20072008 we discovered a resilient and committed group of older women quietly and steadily contributing to community fundraising, building social networks, and providing learning opportunities to each other in diverse ways. Through our conversations with nine craftswomen we have been able to articulate clear links between the theory and models commonly espoused in the community development literature and the life-enriching practices used in organising informal community craft group activities. From our interviews with the older women we provide evidence of sustained participation, the generation of social capital, and the fostering of life-long learning. While none of the women we spoke to were trained in community development and did not use language commonly associated with feminist ideology, the relationship between the informal group work with principles of empowerment and self-efficacy were unmistakeable. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our findings for critical social work practice.

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  • Neurovascular assessment in the critically ill patient

    Johnston-Walker, E.; Hardcastle, J. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Aim: To outline the pathophysiological processes involved in neurovascular impairment and compartment syndrome and examine common contributory factors within the development and clinical presentation of neurovascular impairment in critical care patients with musculoskeletal trauma. Background: Thorough and systematic assessment of neurovascular status in critically ill patients with musculoskeletal trauma is crucial to detect secondary ischaemic injury and implement appropriate and timely treatment of any neurovascular deficits. Method: Current literature relating to neurovascular assessment and associated patient care was reviewed and utilised to outline distinct assessment components, indicators of neurovascular impairment and highlight the important issues for critical care nursing practice. Results: Diminished limb perfusion secondary to vascular impairment and compartment syndrome are well documented. Complications associated with musculoskeletal trauma and surgical intervention can have wide-ranging effects on the patient's functional ability and overall outcome. It is crucial that appropriate neurovascular assessment is undertaken for patients admitted to the critical care unit following musculoskeletal trauma, crush injury, orthopaedic surgery (involving internal or external fixation of fractures) and those who may have experienced prolonged external pressure from casts or tight-fitting bandages. Several elements of neurovascular assessment are, however, more complex to undertake in the context of the unconscious or sedated critically ill patient. Conclusions: Effective practice requires that the critical care nurse has a comprehensive understanding of the aetiology, pathophysiology, physiological responses and clinical presentation associated with neurovascular impairment, secondary ischaemia and compartment syndrome. Relevance to clinical practice: Undertaking an effective neurovascular assessment for patients at risk of neurovascular impairment or acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in the critical care setting can be problematic when patients are unable to communicate with the nurse. The risk of long-term functional impairment or limb loss can be significant in this group of patients, particularly following musculoskeletal trauma. This article reviews the aetiology and pathophysiology of neurovascular impairment in the critical care context and provides guidance for nurses undertaking this important element of nursing assessment with non-verbal, critically unwell patients. Informed practice in neurovascular assessment has the potential to enable early detection and timely management for these patients, which is crucial to optimise patient outcomes.

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  • Behind the news headlines of the Christchurch earthquakes: how communities have been coping

    Gawith, L.; Atkinson, M. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Natural disasters such as the earthquakes in Christchurch have a profound impact, as people “struggle to take in what has happened and deal with their own feelings of distress and powerlessness” (NZ Psychological Society, 2011, para 2). Everyone’s story of the first 7.1 magnitude earthquake in Christchurch on Saturday Sept 4, 2010 is similar. Most people were asleep. Everyone, however, has a story of the 6.3 earthquake on February 22, 2011 meaning that there are over 440,000 stories of people struggling to process the event and their responses. This brief article includes observations of communities coping after the February 22, 2011 earthquake from two community psychologists living in Christchurch.

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  • The development of technology enhanced learning: findings from a 2008 survey of UK higher education institutions

    Jenkins, M.; Browne, T.; Hewitt, R. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article summarises the key findings from a UK survey of higher education institutions, focusing on the development of technology enhanced learning (TEL). TEL is defined as any online facility or system that directly supports learning and teaching. The 2008 survey builds upon previous UCISA surveys conducted in 2001, 2003 and 2005 and for which at each stage after 2001, a longitudinal analysis was undertaken [see Browne, T., Jenkins, M., & Walker, R. (2006). A longitudinal perspective regarding the use of VLEs by higher education institutions in the United Kingdom. Interactive Learning Environments, 14(2), 177–192]. The findings, confirmed by other studies published since 2005, reveal that ensuring the quality of learning and teaching activities is consolidated as the primary driver for using TEL with a committed local champion representing the highest ranked factor in supporting TEL development within an institution. External strategies have been influential, contributing to the rise to prominence of institutional e-learning strategies. The delivery of course content continues to be the most common way in which TEL is used to support teaching and learning. The tools that have increased in prominence are those for podcasting, eportfolios, e-assessment, blogs and wikis. Regarding new activities, streaming media, mobile computing, podcasting and Web 2.0 are discernibly the greatest. Upgrading staff skills were overwhelmingly noted as the greatest challenge that these new activities would create, with staff development and supportive strategies being seen as the primary remedies. However, the perception of lack of time was identified as the main barrier that needed to be surmounted. Though much of the data remain subtle, clear identifiable differences continue to be discernible between Pre-92 and Post-92 universities.

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  • "Making democracy a living, breathing thing: YouTube videos and democratic practice in the 2008 ONE News YouTube election debate

    Beatty, B. E. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The 2008 ONE News YouTube Election Debate in New Zealand was promoted by TVNZ and YouTube executives as innovative public service broadcasting that enabled unprecedented access to the country’s two leading politicians. But according to TVNZ’s Digital Media division the primary purpose of the broadcaster’s partnership with the popular social media company for the debate was to extend its brand and reach. This article examines the live televised debate, arguing that the commercial imperatives were of more interest to TVNZ as it seeks to reorient itself as a digital media company alongside its public service broadcasting mandate.

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  • Strength and conditioning practices in rowing

    Gee, T.; Olsen, P.; Berger, N.; Golby, J.; Thompson, K.G. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    There is limited published research on the practices of strength and conditioning (S &C) coaches in Great Britain. Information about training program design would be useful in developing models of good practice and ecologically valid intervention studies. The aim of this research was to quantify the training practices of coaches responsible for the S&C of rowing athletes. A questionnaire was developed that consisted of 6 sections: (a) personal details, (b) physical testing, (c) strength and power development, (d) flexibility development, (e) unique aspects of the program, and (f) any further relevant comments regarding the athletes prescribed training program. Twenty-two rowing and 10 S&C coaches with an average of 10.5 ± 7.2 years' experience agreed to complete the questionnaire. Approximately, 34% coached rowers of Olympic standard, 34% coached national standard, 3% coached regional standard, 19% coached club standard, and 10% coached university standard rowers. All coaches agreed that strength training enhanced rowing performance and the majority (74%) indicated that athletes' strength trained 2-3 times a week. Almost all coaches (94%) reported their rowers performed strength training, with 81% using Olympic lifting, and 91% employing a periodized training model. The clean (63%) and squat (27%) were rated the most important prescribed exercises. Approximately 50% of coaches used plyometrics such as depth jumps, box drills, and standing jumps. Ninety-four percent indicated they conducted physical testing on their rowers, typically assessing cardiovascular endurance (80%), muscular power (70%), muscular strength (70%), and anaerobic capacity (57%). This research represents the only published survey to date on the S&C practices in rowing within Great Britain.

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  • Identification of an optimal sampling position for stable isotopic analysis of bone collagen of extinct moa (Aves: Emeidae)

    Holdaway, R.; Hawke, D.J.; Bunce, M.; Allentoft, M. E. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Stable isotopic (δ13C; δ15N) analysis of bone collagen and other refractory biological materials is a mainstay of palaeoecological research, but comparability between individuals depends on homogeneity within the sample specimens. Long bones of extinct New Zealand moa display lines of arrested growth that reflect prolonged development over several years, leading to potential systematic inhomogeneity in stable isotopic enrichment within the bone. We tested whether the isotopic content within a Euryapteryx curtus tibiotarsus is homogeneous by measuring δ15N and δ13C values in 6 adjacent 1cm-diameter cortical bone cores arranged along the bone axis from each of the proximal and distal ends. We then measured isotopic ratios in 5 radial slices of a core from the mid-shaft of a Pachyornis elephantopus tibiotarsus to see if there was any depth (ontogenetic) effect at a single sampling point. The δ13C value increased with distance from the proximal bone end, but neither δ13C nor δ15N values in samples from the distal end of the bone were correlated with position. Within mid-shaft cortical bone, the δ13C value decreased with depth but δ15N values were constant. Sampling the entire depth of cortical bone from the caudal surface at the distal end of the tibiotarsus, if feasible, therefore provides a spatially homogenous material, free of maturation effects on stable isotopic composition. If for any reason that position cannot be sampled, the outer (radial) layer at the mid-shaft can be substituted.

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  • Reporting climbing grades and grouping categories for rock climbing

    Draper, N.; Canalejo, J.; Shearman, J. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Rock climbing is an increasingly popular adventure sport with a growing research base. To date the growth of research and reporting styles has been somewhat haphazard and as a consequence comparison between studies can be problematic. The aim of this paper was to make suggestions about a number of changes that could be made to improve the consistency in reporting between studies. Included with this paper are two new tables, one each for male and female climbers. These provide comparative grading scales for use in reporting for future studies. These tables also provide a suggested framework for grouping climbers according to their ability. Using the tables researchers could group the climbers in their study by a category name (lower grade, intermediate, advanced, elite or higher elite climber) or by a number (level 1–5). In addition, the authors make recommendations about climber characteristics that could usefully be reported in future to assist comparison between studies. It would be helpful to readers if the self-reported, highest lead climbs (on-sight and redpoint) could be reported for a climbing group, along with the types of climbing regularly undertaken.

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