5,973 results for 2016

  • Higher education expansion, economic reform and labor productivity

    Yao, Yao (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper studies the impact of higher education expansion, along with economic reform of the state sector, in the late 1990’s in China on its labor productivity. I argue that in an economy such as China, where allocation distortions widely exist, an educational policy affects average labor productivity not only through its effect on human capital stock, but also through its effect on human capital allocation across sectors. Thus, its impact could be very limited if misallocation becomes more severe following the policy. I construct a two-sector general equilibrium model with private enterprises and state-owned enterprises, with policy distortions favoring the latter. Households, heterogeneous in ability, make educational choices and occupational choices in a threeperiod overlapping-generations setting. Counterintuitively, quantitative analysis shows an overall negative effect of higher education expansion on average labor productivity (by 5 percent). Though it did increase China’s skilled human capital stock significantly (by nearly 50 percent), the policy had the effect of reallocating relatively more human capital toward the less-productive state sector. This also directed physical capital allocation toward the state sector and further dampened average labor productivity. It was the economic reform that greatly improved the allocation efficiency and complemented educational policy in enhancing labor productivity (by nearly 50 percent).

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  • Settlement payments in Papua New Guinea - Are they Just or Unjust?

    Sukwianomb, Sheila (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper discusses and analyses settlement payments paid to customary landowners in Papua New Guinea by the State for the acquisition of their customary land prior to Independence. These payments had been introduced after customary landowners had raised their grievances over the low purchase prices that they had been allegedly paid by the early European settlers and the colonial administration over their customary land. They are statutorily fixed payments provided under the National Land Registration Act 197. However, since the introduction of these payments, the State has encountered a number of problems. The main problems are firstly that customary landowners are still dissatisfied with the amounts paid and therefore continuously demanding further payments. Secondly, the National Land Commission which was established to administer the process of facilitating these payments under the National land Registration Act is not performing its functions effectively. Therefore this paper aims to study the historical reasons behind introducing these payments and argues that based on the current problems that the State is experiencing with paying landowners’ settlement payments it should consider whether or not to continue to pay customary landowners.

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  • The Trans-Pacific Partnership - A bane or boon to corporate social responsibility?

    Ariyaratne, Nilupuli (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper examines the possible positive and negative effects that the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) can have on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Accordingly, the thesis will analyse these effects to determine whether the TPP could ultimately serve as a tool for improving or crippling the CSR practices of corporations within TPP States.

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  • Getting the definition of 'consumer' right - Worrying about the smaller ones in Fiji

    Khatri, Bhumika (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper argues that the definition of consumer in Fiji should be broadened to include the micro and small enterprises (MSEs). A survey conducted by the National Centre for Small and Micro Enterprises Development in Fiji provides a deep insight into the operation of MSEs in Fiji. The survey findings reveal that MSEs are vulnerable and could be easily exploited by larger companies in the market. One of the ways in which MSEs could be protected is by providing them with the consumer-level protection. This paper argues that MSEs are eligible for consumer protection because like consumers, they also have poor bargaining power, less expertise in making an informed purchasing decision and significant difficulties in seeking remedies against the large suppliers. The paper further contends that the definition of consumer must not only be widened in the general consumer protection law but in the consumer credit legislation and with respect to unfair contract terms too. The arguments against the proposal to broaden the definition are that all businesses, regardless of their size, should be treated the same, there are other relevant laws for the protection of business-consumers and that it would put extra burden on the suppliers, many of whom are small businesses themselves. The paper ends with a draft definition of consumer which includes domestic consumers, micro businesses, whether purchasing for business use or re-sale and small businesses purchasing for business consumption.

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  • Principles that Should Govern the Right of Employers to Monitor Employee’s Computer Mediated Workplace Communication: Private Sector

    Rodriguez, Laura (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper explores the issues that arise from the surveillance of digital communications at the workplace and how New Zealand has addressed these issues. To achieve that purpose, this paper explores the two prevalent approaches to privacy rights at the workplace: The ownership of the resources (Anglo-American) and the continental Dignity-based (Europe). New Zealand has aligned itself with the Anglo American approach. This approach is less protective of employee’s privacy interests. This paper shall demonstrate that the legal protection of employees from electronic monitoring would be greatly improved by deriving those protections from "human dignity”.

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  • The Origin and Migration of Proportionality

    McManamon, Jane (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper analyses the origin and migration of proportionality covering the history of proportionality, the development into the Basic Law, its migration and current trends including its presence in international and human rights law.

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  • Audiovisual and Chill: An Evaluation of Video Digital Libraries and Catalogues

    Gordon, Timothy Dean (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Research Problem: This research investigates how well video digital libraries and catalogues used in academic libraries meet user expectations. This is in the context of increasing use and demand for online audiovisual content by the wider community, as well as growing use of audiovisual materials for teaching, learning, and research at academic institutions. It also aims to give an understanding of how well libraries are meeting the challenges of delivering audiovisual materials to users in an on-demand world. Methodology: Twelve platforms—developed between 1996 and 2015—are evaluated against 23 user-centred criteria, divided into four core areas: retrieval functionality, user interface, collection qualities, and user support. Results: The study found that not one of the platforms evaluated met all the evaluation criteria, and identified three key areas in the usability of the video digital libraries and catalogues: search and retrieval, technology, and structure, scope, and strategy. Implications: From this we gain an understanding of performance and usability of video digital libraries and catalogues currently in use by academic libraries. We also learn about the difficulties those working with audiovisual materials are facing, and also of the solutions that are being proposed. Findings of this study could help influence decision making, development of future platforms, and influence policies for delivering audiovisual materials to users.

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  • Barriers to uptake and use of data sharing systems at the University of Auckland - Identification of differences in researcher and academic librarian perceptions

    Simons, Joanne Leigh (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Research Problem: To identify the differences in researcher and academic librarian perception of barriers to the uptake of data sharing systems by researchers at the University of Auckland in order to address all possible barriers during implementation and improve researcher use of new systems. Methodology: This study has a cross-sectional research design, using a mixed methods research strategy, in particular a sequential exploratory design where preliminary interviews with researchers and academic librarians informed the construction of an online survey tool distributed more widely to researchers and academic librarians within the University of Auckland. Statistical significance testing was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: 103 survey responses were received from researchers, and 18 from academic librarians. There were observable differences in the relative impact assigned by researchers and librarians to the various factors that influence researcher decisions to share data. There are also significant differences in the perceptions of barriers to data-sharing between research disciplines. Implications: There may be a need to improve communications between the library and researchers with regards to the tools and services that they can offer. Library staff may need additional training in support of University researchers, as a proportion did not feel confident answering questions about researcher data-sharing. The research discipline differences in perceptions of barriers to data-sharing mean that a “one-size fits all” strategy for education in and marketing of these services will not be the most effective strategy to address concerns and increase researcher engagement.

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  • 'It’s just so bloody hard’ : recommendations for improving health interventions and maternity support services for disabled women

    Payne, Deborah; Guerin, Bernadette; McPherson, Kathryn; Roy, Dianne; Giddings, Lynne; Farquhar, Cindy (2016-08)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Paucity of information about Aotearoa/New Zealand disabled women’s experiences of becoming mothers and the enablers and barriers they may face. • Overseas studies show that disabled women do encounter physical, attitudinal barriers. • Studies have also indicated that health professionals lack the knowledge and experience to provide appropriate care. • 2014 Maternity Consumer Survey found that disabled women were less satisfied overall with their maternity care in comparison to non- disabled women. Study aims 1. To investigate the experiences of women with either physical disabilities or sensory impairments in choosing whether to become mothers, including the barriers and facilitators to positive experiences of disabled motherhood; 2. To investigate the perspectives of health care professionals regarding the facilitators and barriers to providing best quality maternity and child care services for disabled women; and 3. To seek consensus on priority actions and strategies towards our overall aim of improving health outcomes for disabled women during pregnancy, childbirth and early childcare.

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  • The Two Towers : appraisal and leadership development for middle leaders

    Bassett, Martin; Robson, Joanne (2016-04)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    "Middle leaders" Two Towers : appraisal and leadership development Crisis in the "middle" - then & now So what? Now what?

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  • Osteopathic attitudes, knowledge and practices in melanoma screening

    Friedlander, Tim; Horgan, Carol; Hilton, Craig (2016-08-13)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Role for Osteopaths?  Osteopaths are Primary Practitioners  Osteopaths often see and examine patients in a state of undress  As health care providers, there is a likelihood that osteopaths can be trained to a good level of skill in melanoma screening  Early Detection Advisory Group (2006) recommends a programme to “increase knowledge about skin cancer, particularly melanoma, among other relevant health workers”

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  • Challenging positional authority : navigating leadership as collaboration

    Wrightson, Helen; Lee-Anne, Turton (2016-08-05)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Challenging positional authority Collective nature of leadership Kaupapa Māori model of leadership Building people’s capabilities Sustainable leadership Distributed leadership is transformational

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  • Professional development for established academic staff : the effectiveness of a writing programme

    Gremillion, Helen (2016-09)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Situate the writing programme in existing literature Describe participants and programme content Present some initial findings Review planned programme evaluation

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  • Encouraging young people into engineering

    Wilson, Hugh (2016-08)

    Conference item
    Unitec

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  • Fads, Façade and Face of Building: A proposal for an urban university campus expansion

    Kuepper, Ann-Kathrin (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    “Transparency means a simultaneous perception of different spatial locations. Space not only recedes but fluctuates in a continuous activity” (Kepes). Universities in New Zealand are increasingly under scrutiny as sites of public investment. This presents a socio-political necessity for academic transparency, and visibility inevitably becomes a matter of architecture through the universities’ physical presence; the façade. Preoccupations with the aesthetics of a building’s envelope, and the pursuit of technological advancement, has led to a singular understanding of the façade as a mechanical boundary. This research challenges the hermetic nature of the contemporary façade and its legitimacy as a subject matter of architectural design within the overall architectural discourse. Drivers for this project include the need to revisit historical precedents, the ambivalence of the label ‘façade’, and a speculative siting as a campus expansion of Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. The design response to the site’s topography via the theory-charged, re-oriented, and as a heterogeneous space, and threshold redefined, façade enables a novel way of projecting a building’s image without depleting the façade’s autonomy. This is achieved through a rigorous iterative modelling methodology. That in turn provokes an ambitious urban campus complex scaling the site between Wellington city and Kelburn Campus. The architectural outcome provides a sophisticated symbolism of the meaning of University when moving through the campus expansion: one transitions from experiencing the visual indication of how learning occurs to the personal experience of it. A constant transparent process of reciprocal visibility, legibility, communication and understanding.

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  • Revitalising the Heart: Addressing the vacant CBD of Rotorua

    Dittmer, Zakary (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The issue of abandoned retail stores is one that is evident throughout the country and at different scales throughout the world. The appearance leaves main streets and central business districts’ looking tired and run down and does little to benefit the local economy. The rise and demand of international retail corporations in provincial cities, has transformed inner city infrastructure. This combined with suburban sprawl has resulted in high building vacancies and poor community moral. Looking to new theories around Urban Interior Architecture, this research explores the boundary between internal and external design methods and pushes for a merger of the design disciplines to create a coherent spatial context. In order to repopulate the city, human focused design methods are explored to encourage social interactions, commercial activity and habitation of the many vacant sites. Through the use of site-specific design, Rotorua will be investigated to understand the reasoning for the abandoned stores and will look to the urban context to identify potential remedies to solve the neglect. The identity of Rotorua its Placemaking and Cultural Heritage of its people will inform the design response to bring the community back into the heart of the central city.

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  • Architecture as a Catalyst for Activity

    Tungatt, Rory (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Many of New Zealand’s smaller town centres struggle to remain viable. A common issue for these declining public realms is the hollowing out of their city centres. Numerous factors may contribute to this problem. Issues such as a lack of access, connectivity and identity within the urban fabric, or instances of privatisation, where forums that were once public have now shifted to a digital interface. One of the challenges facing cities is the diminishing number of “civic” buildings and activity located in the town centre. The Indoor Community Sports Centre (ICSC) offers a partial remedy for this problem. Even with the merging and downsizing of Council’s and their funding, Territorial Authorities continue to invest in ICSCs. This thesis investigates whether these buildings can make a positive contribution to the public domain of town centres. New Zealand ICSC’s, more often than not, are simple shed-like buildings on the periphery of cities or town centres, predominantly occupying or adjacent to large park areas, sports fields or schools. This thesis examines whether the building type can be adapted to become an “urban” building, where it will have the opportunity contribute to a revitalised town centre. A design case study based on Upper Hutt identifies three key design criteria established from initial research of Sports Centres and best-practice Urban Design. These three criteria – breaking up mass, active edges from the outside and creating a dynamic connection – allow the ICSC to become part of the civic realm. The research concludes that an ICSC can be successfully integrated into an “urban” context. In the Upper Hutt case study, success depends on two broader design strategies. First, the ICSC should be located in an area where walkability, functionality and visual and physical connectivity will benefit the public domain. Second, the ICSC should be part of a mixed-use development, which exploits the building type’s inherent flexibility. This is achieved through combining a transport hub, another essential civic amenity, as well as other commercial programmes that provide occupancy during periods of disuse. The thesis shows how a carefully adapted ICSC can turn a somewhat disconnected, hollowed out town into a functional, integrated and walkable one. The redesigned facility does so by linking existing amenities, feeding city-fringe activity back into the city centre and projecting a consciousness of place.

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  • Retrofitting Memory: Retrofitting a Non-Physical Architecture

    Low, Soon Yie (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This project looks at how destroyed architecture, although physically lost, fundamentally continues to exist within human memories as a non-physical entity. The site chosen is Avonside Girls’ High School in Christchurch, New Zealand, a school heavily damaged during the February 22nd earthquake in 2011. The project focuses on the Main Block, a 1930s masonry building which had always been a symbol for the school and its alumni. The key theories relevant to this are studies on non-material architecture and memory as these subjects investigate the relationship between conceptual idea and the triggering of it. This research aims to study how to fortify a thought-based architecture against neglect, similar to the retrofitting of physical structures. In doing so, the importance of the emotive realm of architecture and the idea behind a building (as opposed to the built component itself) is further validated, promoting more broadminded stances regarding the significance of the idea over the object. A new method for disaster recovery and addressing trauma from lost architecture is also acquired. Factors regarding advanced structural systems and programmes are not covered within the scope of this research because the project instead explores issues regarding the boundaries between the immaterial and material. The project methodology involves communicating a narrative derived from the memories alumni and staff members have of the old school block. The approach for portraying the narrative is based on a list of strategies obtained from case studies. The final product of the research is a new design for the high school, conveyed through a set of atmospheric drawings that cross-examines the boundaries between the physical and non-physical realms by representing the version of the school that exists solely within memories.

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  • The Three Pathways to Happiness: How Orientations to Pleasure, Engagement, and Meaning Relate to Grit and Well-Being in a Longitudinal, International Sample

    Ross, Catherine (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Orientations to happiness (OTH)--to what extent people endorse pleasure, engagement, and meaning--and Grit--perseverance and passion for long term goals--have not been studied together longitudinally before. Further, grit and OTH have not been investigated together along with a measure of psychological well-being before. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the links between and among OTH, grit, and well-being through a number of longitudinal mediation analyses. Data from the International Well-Being Study was used, in which 755 participants completed surveys at five time points over one year. The results illustrated that all of the variables were positively related to each other over time, except for a negative relationship found between grit and pleasure OTH. Pleasure, meaning and engagement were all found to be significant predictors and outcomes of the longitudinal mediations of grit to well-being and of well-being to grit. Additionally, engagement was found to be the only OTH pathway that was a marginally significant mediator of the relationship between grit and well-being. Future research should further investigate the relationships between OTH, grit and well-being. This research also has implications for devising and implementing interventions that increase grit and OTH, which also in turn are likely to improve well-being, decrease mental illness, and improve levels of success.

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  • How does a music therapy student work to facilitate reminiscence and memory in dementia patients

    Sun, I-Chen (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study was prompted in response to increased interest in, and demand for, music therapy provision in improving quality of care for dementia patients. It is an exploration of the strategies to facilitate memory and reminiscence in persons with dementia, and considers the need for those preparing for end of life to recall identities, connect with family and others, and express feelings. This research is a qualitative study involving secondary analysis of clinical data from my clinical practice and identifies the strategies, techniques and procedures that I applied in my clinical work to stimulate preserved memory ‘islands’. The findings show that familiarity is central in enabling a remembering process, and music can have unique ways of accessing memory in people with limited cognitive and social abilities. Eight core categories of music therapy strategies were found to be helpful in enabling memory and reminiscence. This study includes examples of both individual and group music therapy. The objective of this study was to examine my music therapy practice, and potentially provide some beneficial ideas and insights to other music therapists working on memory and reminiscence with dementia patients.

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